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1996 Washington Redskins season

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Title: 1996 Washington Redskins season  
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1996 Washington Redskins season

1996 Washington Redskins season
Head coach Norv Turner
Home field RFK Stadium
Results
Record 9–7
Division place 3rd NFC East
Playoff finish did not qualify
Timeline
Previous season Next season
< 1995 1997 >

The 1996 Washington Redskins season began with the team trying to improve on their 6–10 record from 1995. This was the Redskins' last season playing at RFK Stadium, where they had played since 1961. The Redskins are one of only two teams in NFL history to start the season 7–1 and not make the playoffs, the 2012 Chicago Bears being the other.[1]

Although they were eighth in the league in scoring, the Redskins surrendered 2,275 rushing yards, the most in the NFL in 1996.[2] Statistics site Football Outsiders calculates that the 1996 Redskins had, play-for-play, the worst run defense they had ever tracked.[3]

Offseason

NFL Draft

1996 Washington Redskins draft
Round Pick Player Position College Notes
1 30 Andre Johnson  Offensive tackle Penn State
4 102 Stephen Davis *  Running back Auburn
5 138 Leomont Evans  Defensive back Clemson
6 174 Kelvin Kinney  Defensive end Virginia State
7 215 Jeremy Asher  Linebacker Oregon
7 250 DeAndre Maxwell  Wide receiver San Diego State
      Made roster    *   Made at least one Pro Bowl during career

[4]

Personnel

Staff

Regular season

Schedule

Week Date Opponent Result Attendance Notes
1 September 1, 1996 Philadelphia Eagles L 17–14
53,415
Redskins put up 220 yards of offense to the Eagles' 402
2 September 8, 1996 Chicago Bears W 10–3
52,711
Redskins managed only 249 yards of offense
3 September 15, 1996 at New York Giants W 31–10
71,693
Dave Brown was intercepted four times
4 September 22, 1996 at St. Louis Rams W 17–10
62,303
Gus Frerotte and Steve Walsh combined for five interceptions
5 September 29, 1996 New York Jets W 31–16
52,068
Both teams combined for 295 rushing yards
6 Bye
7 October 13, 1996 at New England Patriots W 27–22
59,638
Redskins stopped late 2-point conversion run
8 October 20, 1996 New York Giants W 31–21
52,684
Redskins scored 21 points in second quarter
9 October 27, 1996 Indianapolis Colts W 31–16
54,254
Two teams combined for 315 rushing yards
10 November 3, 1996 at Buffalo Bills L 38–13
78,002
Redskins gashed for 266 rushing yards
11 November 10, 1996 Arizona Cardinals L 37–34 OT
51,929
Boomer Esiason threw for 522 yards despite four interceptions
12 November 17, 1996 at Philadelphia Eagles W 26–21
66,834
Jamie Asher caught two touchdowns
13 November 24, 1996 San Francisco 49ers L 19–16
54,235
Redskins forced six fumbles but recovered only one of them
14 November 28, 1996 at Dallas Cowboys L 21–10
64,955
Emmitt Smith's 155 rushing yards nearly eclipsed Gus Frerotte's 175 passing yards
15 December 8, 1996 at Tampa Bay Buccaneers L 24–10
44,733
Gus Frerotte and Trent Dilfer combined for only 331 passing yards
16 December 15, 1996 at Arizona Cardinals L 27–26
34,260
Redskins swept by Cardinals for third time in four seasons
17 December 22, 1996 Dallas Cowboys W 37–10
56,454
Final game for RFK Stadium

Standings

NFC East
W L T PCT PF PA
Dallas Cowboys 10 6 0 .625 286 250
Philadelphia Eagles 10 6 0 .625 363 341
Washington Redskins 9 7 0 .563 364 312
Arizona Cardinals 7 9 0 .438 300 397
New York Giants 6 10 0 .375 242 297

Awards and records

References

  1. ^ Trister, Noah (2012-12-30). "Bears miss playoffs despite 26–24 win over Lions".  
  2. ^ Pro-Football-Reference.com: 1996 NFL Opposition & Defensive Statistics
  3. ^ Football Outsiders – DVOA 7.0: Worst Teams Ever, 1991–2011.
  4. ^ "1996 Washington Redskins Draftees". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 28, 2014. 


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