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2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine

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Title: 2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine  
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Language: English
Subject: 2,4,5-Trimethoxyphenethylamine, 2C-D, 2C-G, PiHKAL, 2C-E
Collection: Amphetamines, Designer Drugs, Phenol Ethers, Substituted Amphetamines, Taar1 Agonists
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2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine

2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-(4-ethyl-2,5-dimethoxy-phenyl)propan-2-amine
Clinical data
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number  N
PubChem CID:
DrugBank  Y
ChemSpider  Y
ChEMBL  Y
Synonyms 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine
Chemical data
Formula C13H21NO2
Molecular mass 223.31 g/mol
 N   

2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine (DOET, DOE, Hecate) is a synthesized by Alexander Shulgin, and was described in his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved).[1]

Contents

  • Chemistry 1
  • Pharmacology 2
  • Effects 3
  • Legality 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Chemistry

DOET is in a class of compounds commonly known as substituted amphetamines; its full chemical name is 4-ethyl-2,5-dimethoxy-alpha-methylbenzeneethanamine, or 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylphenyl)propan-2-amine. It has an active stereocenter and (R)-DOET is the more active enantiomer. DOET is an extremely rare compound and reports of its effects and toxicology in humans are sparse. However, like the more common 2,5-dimethoxy-amphetamine analogues DOB, DOI and DOM, it is a potent and long-acting psychedelic. Removal of the alpha-methyl moiety yields the 2-carbon analogue, commonly known as 2C-E, another psychedelic compound first synthesized by Dr. Alexander Shulgin.

Pharmacology

Similarly to related drugs like DOM, DOET likely acts as a 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT2C receptor partial agonist. It is an agonist of human TAAR1.[2][3]

Effects

DOET produces psychedelic effects that last up 14-20 hours. In PiHKAL, Shulgin lists the dosage of DOET as being 2-7 mg orally, with 6-7 mg being the dosage for full, desired effects.[1]

Legality

DOET is classified as a Schedule 1 substance in the United States, and is similarly controlled in other parts of the world. Internationally, DOET is a Schedule I drug under the Convention on Psychotropic Substances [2].

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Shulgin, Alexander; Shulgin, Ann (September 1991). PiHKAL: A Chemical Love Story. United States: Transform Press. p. 978.  
  2. ^ "Articleid 50034244". Binding Database. Retrieved 29 April 2014. 
  3. ^ "Compound ID: CHEMBL2360469". ChEMBL. Retrieved 29 April 2014. 

External links

  • DOET Entry in PiHKAL
  • DOET Entry in PiHKAL • info
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