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2004 Oklahoma Sooners football team

2004 Oklahoma Sooners football
Big 12 Champions
Big 12 South Division Champions
Conference Big 12 Conference South
Ranking
Coaches #3
AP #3
2004 record 12–1 (9–0 Big 12)
Head coach Bob Stoops (6th year)
Co-offensive coordinator Chuck Long (3rd year)
Co-offensive coordinator Kevin Wilson (3rd year)
Co-defensive coordinator Brent Venables (6th year)
Co-defensive coordinator Bo Pelini (1st year)
Home stadium Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium
(Capacity: 82,112)
2004 Big 12 football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
North
Colorado xy   4 4         8 5  
Iowa State x   4 4         7 5  
Missouri   3 5         5 6  
Nebraska   3 5         5 6  
Kansas   2 6         4 7  
Kansas State   2 6         4 7  
South
#3 Oklahoma xy   8 0         12 1  
#5 Texas   7 1         11 1  
#18 Texas Tech   5 3         8 4  
Texas A&M   5 3         7 5  
Oklahoma State   4 4         7 5  
Baylor   1 7         3 8  
Championship: Oklahoma 42, Colorado 3
† – BCS representative as conference champion
‡ – BCS at-large representative
x – Division champion/co-champions
y – Championship game participant
Rankings from AP Poll

The 2004 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma during the 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season season, the 110th season of Sooner football. The team was led by two-time Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award winner, Bob Stoops, in his 6th season as the OU head coach. They played their home games at Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman, Oklahoma. They were a charter member of the Big 12 conference.

Conference play began with a win over Texas Tech in Norman on October 2nd, and ended with a win over Colorado in the 2004 Big 12 Championship Game on December 4th. The Sooners finished the season 12–1 (9–0 in Big 12) while winning their third Big 12 title and their 39th conference title overall. They were invited to the 2005 Orange Bowl, which served as the BCS National Championship Game that year, where they lost to USC, 19-55. USC was later forced to vacate this win because of the ineligibility of Reggie Bush, but Oklahoma still counts it as a loss.

Following the season, Jammal Brown was selected 13th overall and Mark Clayton 22nd in the 2005 NFL Draft, along with Brodney Pool, Mark Bradley and Dan Cody in the 2nd round, Brandon Jones in the 3rd, Antonio Perkins in the 4th, Donte Nicholson, Mike Hawkins and Lance Mitchell in the 5th, and Wes Sims in the 6th. This total number of 11 stands as the most Sooners taken in the NFL Draft in the 15 years of the Stoops era.

Contents

  • Schedule 1
  • Coaching Staff 2
  • Game notes 3
    • Bowling Green 3.1
    • Oregon 3.2
  • Statistics 4
    • Team 4.1
    • Scores by quarter 4.2
  • 2005 NFL Draft 5
  • References 6

Schedule

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 4 11:00 AM Bowling Green* #2 Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial StadiumNorman, OK ABC W 40–24   84,319[1]
September 11 6:00 PM Houston* #2 Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK TBS W 63–13   84,280[1]
September 18 2:30 PM Oregon* #2 Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK ABC W 31–7   84,574[1]
October 2 11:30 AM Texas Tech #2 Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK FSN W 28–13   84,580[1]
October 9 2:30 PM vs. #5 Texas #2 Cotton BowlDallas, TX (Red River Shootout) ABC W 12–0   79,587[1]
October 16 11:00 AM at Kansas State #2 KSU StadiumManhattan, KS ABC W 31–21   52,310[1]
October 23 6:00 PM Kansasdagger #2 Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK FSN W 41–10   84,520[1]
October 30 11:00 AM at #20 Oklahoma State #2 Boone Pickens StadiumStillwater, OK (Bedlam Series) ABC W 38–35   48,837[1]
November 6 2:30 PM at #22 Texas A&M #2 Kyle FieldCollege Station, TX ABC W 42–35   81,125[1]
November 13 6:00 PM Nebraska #2 Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK (OU-Nebraska) FSN W 30–3   84,916[1]
November 15 11:00 AM at Baylor #2 Floyd Casey StadiumWaco, TX FSN W 35–0   32,182[1]
December 4 7:00 PM vs. Colorado #2 Arrowhead StadiumKansas City, MO ABC W 42–3   62,130[1]
January 4 7:00 PM vs. #1 USC #2 Dolphins StadiumMiami Gardens, FL (Orange Bowl) ABC L 19–55   77,912[1]
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Central Time.

Note: The NCAA forced USC to vacate their Orange Bowl victory due to an eligibility issue, however, Oklahoma still counts it as a loss.

Coaching Staff

Name Position
Bob Stoops Head Coach
Brent Venables Associate Head Coach
Co-Defensive Coordinator
Linebackers
Bobby Jack Wright Assistant Head Coach
Defensive Ends
Special Teams
Recruiting Coordinator
Chuck Long Offensive Coordinator
Quarterbacks
Bo Pelini Co-Defensive Coordinator
Secondary
Kevin Wilson Co-Offensive Coordinator
Offensive Line
Run Game Coordinator
Cale Gundy Running Backs
Jackie Shipp Defensive Line
Kevin Sumlin Tight Ends
Darrell Wyatt Wide Receivers

Source: [2]

Game notes

Bowling Green

Bowling Green Falcons at #2 Oklahoma Sooners
1 2 3 4 Total
Bowling Green 7 3 0 14 24
#2 Oklahoma 7 17 13 3 40
[3]


Oregon

Oregon Ducks at #2 Oklahoma Sooners
1 2 3 4 Total
Oregon 0 0 7 0 7
#2 Oklahoma 0 10 14 7 31
  • Source: [4]

Statistics


Statistics

Team

OU Opp
Points per Game 34.8 16.8
First Downs 310 203
  Rushing 147 75
  Passing 144 110
  Penalty 19 18
Rushing Yardage 2709 1230
  Rushing Attempts 565 402
  Avg per Rush 4.8 3.1
  Avg per Game 208.4 94.6
Passing Yardage 3298 2657
  Avg per Game 253.7 204.4
  Completions-Attempts 268-406 (66%) 223-410 (54.4%)
Total Offense 6007 3887
  Total Plays 971 812
  Avg per Play 6.2 4.8
  Avg per Game 462.1 299
Fumbles-Lost 20-9 18-14
OU Opp
Punts-Yards 53-2184 (41.2 avg) 84-3493 (41.6 avg)
Punt Returns-Total Yards 35-316 (9 avg) 22-95 (4.3 avg)
Kick Returns-Total Yards 28-534 (19.1 avg) 35-553 (15.8 avg)
Avg Time of Possession per Game 33:11 26:49
Penalties-Yards 85-733 83-652
  Avg per Game 56.4 50.2
3rd Down Conversions 108/200 (54%) 66/182 (36.3%)
4th Down Conversions 12/17 (70.6%) 8/17 (47.1%)
Sacks By-Yards 39-258 9-73
Total TDs 61 28
  Rushing 22 10
  Passing 36 15
Fields Goals-Attempts 9-17 (52.9%%) 8-11 (72.3%)
PAT-Attempts 57-60 (95%) 27-28 (96.4%)
Total Attendance 507,189 214,454
  Games-Avg per Game 6-84,532 4-53,614

Scores by quarter

1 2 3 4 Total
Opponents 49 75 44 51 219
Oklahoma 87 161 121 83 452

2005 NFL Draft

The 2005 NFL Draft was held on April 23-24, 2005, at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City. The following Oklahoma players were either selected or signed as undrafted free agents following the draft.
Player Position Round Pick NFL Team
Jammal Brown OT 1st 13 New Orleans Saints
Mark Clayton WR 1st 22 Baltimore Ravens
Brodney Pool DB 2nd 34 Cleveland Browns
Mark Bradley WR 2nd 39 Chicago Bears
Dan Cody DE 2nd 53 Baltimore Ravens
Brandon Jones WR 3rd 96 Tennessee Titans
Antonio Perkins DB 4th 103 Cleveland Browns
Donte Nicholson DB 5th 141 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Mike Hawkins CB 5th 167 Green Bay Packers
Lance Mitchell LB 5th 168 Arizona Cardinals
Wes Sims G 6th 177 San Diego Chargers
Jonathan Jackson DE Undrafted Chicago Bears
Lynn McGruder DT Undrafted Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Jason White QB Undrafted Tennessee Titans
[5]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "2004 Season". Sooner Stats. Retrieved September 27, 2011. 
  2. ^ "2004 Oklahoma Football Media Guide". University of Oklahoma Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved October 29, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Sooners Cruise Behind Two 100-Yard Rushers".  
  4. ^ "Peterson's Third 100-Yard Day Drives Oklahoma".  
  5. ^ "2005 NFL Draft". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 13, 2014. 
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