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2006 Primetime Emmy Awards

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2006 Primetime Emmy Awards

58th Primetime Emmy Awards
File:58th Primetime Emmy Awards intertitle.jpg
Date
  • August 27, 2006 (Ceremony)
  • August 19, 2006 (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, California
Host Conan O'Brien
Television coverage
Network NBC
Producer Ken Ehrlich and Jeff Ross

57th Primetime Emmy Awards 59th >

The 58th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards were held at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California on Sunday, August 27, 2006 on NBC at 8:00pm ET (00:00 UTC) with Conan O'Brien hosting the show. The ceremony attracted 16.2 million viewers, 2½ million fewer than the previous year's ceremony, but still the ratings winner for the week.[1] The Discovery Channel received its first major nomination this year.

This awards show was the first in 14 years to be held in August because of NBC's request; because of NBC Sunday Night Football, the show moved to accommodate NFL Kickoff Weekend.

A new voting system determined nominees in particular categories (mostly lead acting and outstanding series categories) by a "blue ribbon" panel of judges, which resulted in the exclusion of popular shows such as Desperate Housewives and Lost, and actors like Hugh Laurie from House. Lost's exclusion was mocked during the opening sequence (see below), when O'Brien, accompanied by Hugo "Hurley" Reyes, heads down a hatch to get to the Emmys. O'Brien asked Reyes if he wanted to come; Reyes says coyly, "Well, we weren't exactly invited", to which O'Brien replies "But you won last year!"

For its second season, The Office won Outstanding Comedy Series, this was its only major award. No comedy series won more than two major awards. In the drama field 24 won Outstanding Drama Series after being nominated and losing the previous four years. It's three major awards topped all drama series. Ellen Burstyn was nominated for the Emmy for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Special for her role in Mrs. Harris, even though she was onscreen for only 14 seconds.

The show that received the most major nominations was Grey's Anatomy, with eight. The top-nominated show had not received so few nominations since 1970, when Marcus Welby, M.D. received six. However, there were far fewer nominations back then, with most categories having three slots. This made this ceremony even more unique.

The pilot episode of My Name is Earl joined a select group of TV episodes to win Emmys for both writing and directing.


Winners and Nominees

[2]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Special
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries
Outstanding Reality/Competition Program

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie


Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie


Guest performances

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Cloris Leachman as Grandma Ida on Malcolm in the Middle, (Episode: "Bride of Ida"), (Fox)
    • Blythe Danner as Marilyn Truman on Will & Grace, (NBC)
    • Shirley Knight as Phyllis Van De Kamp on Desperate Housewives, (Episode: "You'll Never Get Away from Me"), (ABC)
    • Laurie Metcalf as Cora Little on Monk, (Episode: "Mr. Monk Bumps His Head"), (USA)
    • Kate Winslet as Herself on Extras, (Episode: "Kate Winslet"), (HBO)
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series

Directing

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Directing for a Variety, Music or Comedy Program Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special


Writing

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Writing for a Variety, Music or Comedy Program Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special
  • The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, (Comedy Central)
    • The Colbert Report, (Comedy Central)
    • Late Night with Conan O'Brien, (NBC)
    • Late Show with David Letterman, (CBS)
    • Real Time with Bill Maher, (HBO)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
  • HBO – 48
  • NBC – 27
  • CBS – 22
  • ABC – 15
  • Fox – 10
By program
  • Grey's Anatomy (ABC) – 8
  • Mrs. Harris (HBO) – 7
  • Bleak House (PBS) / Elizabeth I (HBO) / Six Feet Under (HBO) / Will & Grace (NBC) – 6

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
  • HBO – 10
  • NBC – 9
  • Fox – 4
  • ABC / Comedy Central – 2
By program
  • Elizabeth I (HBO) – 4
  • 24 (Fox) / The Girl in the Café (HBO) – 3
Notes

Opening sequence and subsequent controversy

The plane crash Lost parody

The opening sequence of the 58th Primetime Emmy Awards show depicted the The Office.

The intention of this opening sequence was to parody the premise of the ABC television series Lost; however, the sequence reportedly disturbed some viewers because of the Comair Flight 5191 aircraft disaster that had occurred earlier in the day.[3]

[2].

Other parodies

The skit also parodied shows such as The Office, 24, House, South Park, and Dateline NBC (specifically, the "To Catch a Predator" segments). An animated Tom Cruise from the South Park episode "Trapped in the Closet" appears in a skit where an animated O'Brien hides in Stan Marsh's closet, only to run away when he discovers Cruise has already occupied the closet.

Tributes

The show featured tributes to two TV legends : Dick Clark ("America's Oldest Teenager"), and Aaron Spelling, producer of such classic TV shows as Dynasty and Beverly Hills, 90210. The former tribute was presented by Simon Cowell, American Idol judge, with a performance by Barry Manilow, who won an Emmy later that evening. Joan Collins, Heather Locklear, and Stephen Collins, along with the original three Charlie's Angels, gave the tribute for Spelling.

In Memoriam

Dennis Weaver, Barnard Hughes, Philo T. Farnsworth, Don Adams, Dan Curtis, Lew Anderson, Ralph Edwards, Curt Gowdy, Robert Sterling, Michael Piller, Red Buttons, Mike Douglas, Scott Brazil, Anthony Franciosa, Phyllis Huffman, Darren McGavin, Gloria Monty, Jan Murray, Pat Morita, Al Lewis, Maureen Stapleton, Buck Owens, Jack Warden, Don Knotts, Robert Wise, John Spencer, Louis Nye, Shelley Winters and Richard Pryor.

References

External links

  • Official list of all nominees
  • Nikki Finke Asks: "What Was NBC/Conan Thinking?"
  • Video of the Plane Crash Sequence from the 58th Primetime Emmy Broadcast

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