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2015 ATP World Tour Finals

 

2015 ATP World Tour Finals

2015 ATP World Tour Finals
Date 15–22 November
Edition 46th (singles) / 41st (doubles)
Category ATP World Tour Finals
Draw 8S/8D
Prize money $7,000,000
Surface Hard / indoor
Location London, United Kingdom
Venue O2 arena
2014 Champions
Singles
 Novak Djokovic (SRB)
Doubles
 Bob Bryan (USA) /  Mike Bryan (USA)

The 2015 ATP World Tour Finals (also known as the 2015 Barclays ATP World Tour Finals for sponsorship reasons) is a men's tennis tournament played at the O2 Arena in London, United Kingdom, between 15 and 22 November 2015. It is the season-ending event for the best singles players and doubles teams on the 2015 ATP World Tour.

Contents

  • Tournament 1
    • Format 1.1
  • Points and prize money 2
  • Qualification 3
    • Singles 3.1
    • Doubles 3.2
  • Contenders points breakdown 4
    • Singles 4.1
    • Doubles 4.2
  • Qualified players 5
    • Singles 5.1
    • Doubles 5.2
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Tournament

The 2015 ATP World Tour Finals will take place from 16 to 22 November at the O2 Arena in London, United Kingdom. It is the 46th edition of the tournament (41st in doubles). The tournament is run by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) and is part of the 2015 ATP World Tour. The event takes place on indoor hard courts. It serves as the season-ending championships for players on the ATP Tour. The eight players who qualify for the event are split into two groups of four. During this stage, players compete in a round-robin format (meaning players play against all the other players in their group). The two players with the best results in each group progress to the semifinals, where the winners of a group face the runners-up of the other group. This stage, however, is a knock-out stage. The doubles competition uses the same format.[1]

Format

The ATP World Tour Finals has a round-robin format, with eight players/teams divided into two groups of four. The eight seeds are determined by the ATP Rankings and ATP Doubles Team Rankings on the Monday after the last ATP World Tour tournament of the calendar year. All singles matches are the best of three tie-break sets, including the final. All doubles matches are two sets (no ad) and a Match Tie-break.[2]

Points and prize money

Stage Singles Doubles1 Points
Champion RR + $1,750,000 RR + $226,000 RR + 900
Runner-up RR + $590,000 RR + $76,000 RR + 400
Round Robin win per match $155,000 $30,000 200
Participation fee $155,000 $76,000 N/A
Alternates $85,000 $30,000 N/A
  • RR is points or prize money won in the Round Robin Stage.
  • 1 Prize money for doubles is per team.

Qualification

Singles

Eight players compete at the tournament, with two named alternates. Players receive places in the following order of precedence:[3]

  1. First, the top 7 players in the ATP rankings on the Monday after the final tournament of the ATP World Tour, that is, after the 2015 Paris Masters.
  2. Second, up to two 2015 Grand Slam tournament winners ranked anywhere 8th-20th, in ranking order
  3. Third, the eighth ranked player in the ATP rankings

In the event of this totaling more than 8 players, those lower down in the selection order become the alternates. If further alternates are needed, these players are selected by the ATP. [3]

Provisional rankings are published weekly as the ATP Race to the World Tour Finals, coinciding with the 52-week rolling ATP rankings on the date of selection. Points are accumulated in Grand Slam, ATP World Tour, Davis Cup, ATP Challenger Tour and ITF Futures tournaments from the 52 weeks prior to the selection date, with points from the previous years Tour Finals excluded. Players accrue points across 18 tournaments, usually made up of:

  • The 4 Grand Slam tournaments
  • The 8 mandatory ATP Masters tournaments
  • The best results from any 6 other tournaments that carry ranking points

All players must include the ranking points for mandatory Masters tournaments for which they are on the original acceptance list and for all Grand Slams for which they would be eligible, even if they do not compete (in which case they receive zero points). Furthermore, players who finished 2014 in the world's top 30 are commitment players who must (if not injured) include points for the 8 mandatory Masters tournament regardless of whether they enter, and who must compete in at least 4 ATP 500 tournaments (though the Monte Carlo Masters may count to this total), of which one must take place after the US Open. Zero point scores may also be taken from withdrawls by non-injured players from ATP 500 tournaments according to certain other conditions outlined by the ATP. [3] Beyond these rules, however, a player may substitute his next best tournament result for missed Masters and Grand Slam tournaments.

Players may have their ATP World Tour Masters 1000 commitment be reduced by one tournament, by reaching each of the following milestones:

  1. 600 tour level matches (as of January 1 2015), including matches from Challengers and Futures played before year 2010;
  2. 12 years of service;
  3. 31 years of age (as of January 1 2015).

Players must be defined by the ATP as in good standing to avail of the reduced commitment.[3]

Doubles

Eight teams compete at the tournament, with one named alternates. The eight competing teams receive places according to the same order of precedence as in Singles.[3] The named alternate will be offered first to any unaccepted teams in the selection order, then to the highest ranked unaccepted team, and then to a team selected by the ATP. [3] Points are accumulated in the same competitions as for the Singles tournament. However for Doubles teams there are no commitment tournaments, so teams are ranked according to their 18 highest points scoring results from any tournaments.

Contenders points breakdown

Singles

Rankings as of 2 November 2015. [4]

  • Players with a gold number have qualified.
  • Players in blue are active in Paris.
  • Italicized rounds and points indicate that points from another tournament have been substituted into the rankings, following competition regulations.
Rank Player Grand Slam ATP World Tour Masters 1000[1] Best Other Total points Tourn
AO RG WIM USO IW MIA MAD ROM CAN CIN SHA PAR 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 Novak Djokovic W
2000
F
1200
W
2000
W
2000
W
1000
W
1000
A
0
W
1000
F
600
F
600
W
1000
R32
10
W
1000
W
500
F
300
QF
45
DC
40
14,295 16
2 Andy Murray F
1200
SF
720
SF
720
R16
180
SF
360
F
600
W
1000
R16
90
W
1000
SF
360
SF
360
R32
10
W
500
DC
350
W
250
QF
90
QF
90
R32
0
7,880 19
3 Roger Federer R32
90
QF
360
F
1200
F
1200
F
600
A
0
R32
10
F
600
A
0
W
1000
R32
10
R32
10
W
500
W
500
W
500
W
250
W
250
R16
90
7,170 16
4 Stan Wawrinka SF
720
W
2000
QF
360
SF
720
R64
10
R32
45
R16
90
SF
360
R32
10
QF
180
QF
180
R32
10
W
500
W
500
W
250
R16
90
DC
80
R16
45
6,150 22
5 Rafael Nadal QF
360
QF
360
R64
45
R32
90
QF
180
R32
45
F
600
QF
180
QF
180
R16
90
SF
360
R32
10
W
500
SF
360
F
300
F
300
W
250
W
250
4,460 22
6 Tomáš Berdych SF
720
R16
180
R16
180
R16
180
QF
180
SF
360
SF
360
QF
180
R32
10
QF
180
QF
180
R32
10
F
600
F
300
W
250
W
250
SF
180
F
150
4,450 20
7 David Ferrer R16
180
QF
360
A
0
R32
90
R32
45
QF
180
QF
180
SF
360
SF
180
SF
180
R32
10
R32
10
W
500
W
500
W
500
W
250
W
250
QF
180
3,955 18
7 Kei Nishikori QF
360
QF
360
R64
45
R128
10
R16
90
QF
180
SF
360
QF
180
SF
360
A
0
R16
90
R32
10
W
500
W
500
F
300
W
250
SF
180
SF
180
3,955 20
9 Richard Gasquet R32
90
R16
180
SF
720
QF
360
R64
10
R16
45
R32
45
R32
45
A
0
QF
180
R16
90
R32
10
W
250
W
250
SF
180
QF
90
SF
90
R16
45
2,680 18
10 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga A
0
SF
720
R32
90
QF
360
R32
0
R32
45
R16
90
R32
45
QF
180
R64
10
F
600
R32
10
W
250
R16
90
R16
45
R16
20
R32
0
DC
0
2,555 17
11 Marin Cilic A
0
R16
180
QF
360
SF
720
R64
10
A
0
R32
45
R64
10
R32
10
R16
90
R16
90
R32
10
W
250
QF
180
SF
180
QF
90
SF
90
SF
90
2,405 21
12 Kevin Anderson R16
180
R32
90
R16
180
QF
360
R32
45
R16
90
R64
10
R16
90
R64
10
R16
90
QF
180
R32
10
F
300
W
250
SF
180
F
150
SF
90
SF
90
2,395 24
13 John Isner R32
90
R64
45
R32
90
R16
180
R16
90
SF
360
QF
180
R16
90
QF
180
R64
10
R16
90
R32
10
F
300
W
250
R16
90
SF
90
QF
90
QF
90
2,325 24
  1. ^ 2015 Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters is not a mandatory tournament, and is counted in the Best Other column instead.

Doubles

Rankings as of 30th October.

  • Teams in gold have qualified. Players in blue are active in Paris.
Rank Team Points Total Points Tourn
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
1  Bob Bryan (USA)
 Mike Bryan (USA)
F
1200
W
1000
W
1000
W
1000
W
500
QF
360
W
250
W
250
R16
180
QF
180
QF
180
QF
90
R16
90
DC
50
QF
45
R16
0
R16
0
R16
0
6,375 21
2  Jean-Julien Rojer (NED)
 Horia Tecău (ROU)
W
2000
SF
720
SF
720
QF
360
W
500
QF
180
QF
180
QF
180
QF
180
SF
180
SF
180
SF
180
SF
180
F
150
F
150
R16
90
SF
90
QF
90
6,310 21
3  Jamie Murray (GBR)
 John Peers (AUS)
F
1200
F
1200
W
500
F
325
F
300
F
300
F
300
W
250
R16
180
R16
180
QF
180
QF
180
QF
180
QF
135
R16
90
SF
90
QF
45
R32
0
5,635 25
4  Ivan Dodig (CRO)
 Marcelo Melo (BRA)
W
2000
SF
720
W
500
QF
360
SF
360
SF
360
SF
360
F
300
QF
180
R16
0
R16
0
R64
0
R16
0
5,140 13
5  Simone Bolelli (ITA)
 Fabio Fognini (ITA)
W
2000
SF
720
F
600
F
600
F
600
SF
180
R16
90
DC
60
QF
45
R32
0
R16
0
R64
0
R16
0
R64
0
R16
0
R16
0
4,895 16
6  Pierre-Hugues Herbert (FRA)
 Nicolas Mahut (FRA)
W
2000
F
1200
W
500
R16
180
R16
180
QF
180
F
150
F
150
R16
90
QF
90
QF
45
R16
0
R16
0
R16
0
4,765 14
7  Marcin Matkowski (POL)
 Nenad Zimonjić (SRB)
F
600
F
600
QF
360
QF
360
QF
360
SF
360
SF
360
F
300
QF
180
QF
180
SF
180
SF
180
QF
90
QF
90
SF
90
R32
0
R16
0
R32
0
4,290 19
8  Rohan Bopanna (IND)
 Florin Mergea (ROU)
W
1000
SF
720
QF
360
F
300
W
250
R16
180
QF
180
SF
180
F
150
R16
90
QF
45
R32
0
R16
0
R16
0
R16
0
R16
0
3,455 16
9  Alexander Peya (AUT)
 Bruno Soares (BRA)
W
500
QF
360
QF
360
SF
360
W
250
QF
180
SF
180
SF
180
SF
180
SF
180
F
150
R32
90
R16
90
QF
90
QF
90
SF
90
R32
0
R16
0
3,330 25
10  Vasek Pospisil (CAN)
 Jack Sock (USA)
W
1000
F
600
W
500
QF
360
R16
180
QF
180
R16
0
R16
0
R16
0
R64
0
R32
0
R32
0
2,820 12
11  Juan Sebastian Cabal (COL)
 Robert Farah (COL)
F
300
F
300
W
250
W
250
QF
180
QF
180
SF
180
SF
180
F
150
R32
90
R32
90
R32
90
R16
90
R16
90
R16
90
QF
90
QF
90
QF
45
2,735 24
12  Daniel Nestor (CAN)
 Edouard Roger-Vasselin (FRA)
W
1000
F
600
SF
360
F
300
R16
180
R16
90
QF
90
2,620 7

Qualified players

Singles

# Players Points Tours Date Qualified
1  Novak Djokovic (SRB) 11,985 13 4 June[5]
2  Andy Murray (GBR) 7,370 16 15 August[6]
3  Roger Federer (SUI) 5,885 14 8 September[7]
4  Stan Wawrinka (SUI) 5,500 17 9 September[8]
5  Rafael Nadal (ESP) 4,330 20 18 October[9]
6  Tomáš Berdych (CZE) 4,280 19 18 October[9]
7  David Ferrer (ESP) 3,945 17 31 October[10]
8  Kei Nishikori (JPN) 3,945 19 31 October[10]


On June 4, 2015, Novak Djokovic was announced as the tournament's first qualifier upon reaching the semifinals of the 2015 French Open. [5]

Novak Djokovic began his season in Doha, where he reached the quarterfinals before losing to Ivo Karlovic in a tight three set match. He then went on to reach the final of every subsequent tournament he played, beginning with reclaiming the Australian Open title, defeating Andy Murray in four sets to become the first man in the Open Era to win five titles in Melbourne. After losing the final in Dubai to Roger Federer, Djokovic went on a 28-match winning streak, first leading Serbia to the quarterfinals of the Davis Cup before winning the first three Masters 1000 titles of the year in Indian Wells, Miami and Monte-Carlo, beating Federer, Murray and Tomáš Berdych respectively in the finals. After skipping Madrid, he successfully defended his title at the Rome Masters, defeating Federer in the final once again. At the French Open, Djokovic once again made it to the final, defeating Murray en route in a gruelling 5-set thriller in the semifinals. Ultimately he lost the final to Stan Wawrinka, denying the Serb a first title in Paris and a Career Grand Slam. He rebounded quickly to win his third Wimbledon title, defeating Federer in the final for the second year in a row to successfully defend his title. In the first tournament of the US Open Series, Djokovic made it to the final of the Canada Masters for only the fourth time, making it to the final before losing to Murray in what was his first loss in nine encounters with the Scot. Djokovic is set to make his ninth consecutive appearance at the season finale.

Andy Murray became the second player to qualify on August 15, during his victorious campaign at the Rogers Cup. [6]

Andy Murray opened his campaign at the Hopman Cup, where he was partnered by Heather Watson. The Brits finished their group second behind Poland, despite being level on ties and matches won, however Murray won each of his singles matches against Benoît Paire, Jerzy Janowicz and Marinko Matosevic respectively. Murray's first competitive tournament of the year was the Australian Open, where he made it to the final for the fourth time, however lost to Novak Djokovic, becoming the first man in the Open Era to lose four Australian Open finals. After quarterfinal losses in both Rotterdam and Dubai to Gilles Simon and Borna Coric respectively, Murray made it to the semifinals in Indian Wells, and his fourth final in Miami, losing to Djokovic in both instances. He then went on to have his most successful clay court season to date, reaching his first ever final on clay at the BMW Open in Munich. He defeated home favourite Philipp Kohlschreiber in the final to claim the first clay title of his career. This was followed up by reaching his first Masters 1000 final on clay, defeating three top 10 opponents in succession for the first time on clay, including a first clay court victory over Rafael Nadal, to win the title in Madrid for the first time since 2008. Murray withdrew prior to his third round match against David Goffin in Rome, citing fatigue, before reaching his third semifinal at the French Open, losing again to Djokovic in a thrilling 5-set encounter. Murray began his grass court season by winning his fourth title at the Queen's Club, joining John McEnroe, Lleyton Hewitt and Andy Roddick for the most titles at the tournament in the Open Era. He made it to the semifinals at Wimbledon, losing to a dominant Roger Federer in straight sets. He then returned to the Queen's Club for the Davis Cup Quarterfinals, where he won both his singles and the doubles rubber against France to lead Great Britain to the semifinals of the Davis Cup for the first time since 1981. Murray began the US Open Series by winning the Rogers Cup for the third time, defeating Djokovic for the first time since his historic triumph at the 2013 Wimbledon final. This is the eighth time Murray has qualified for the year-end championships, set to make his seventh appearance.

Following his run to the US Open final, Roger Federer became the third man to qualify.

Roger Federer made a winning start to his 2015 season, winning the title at the Brisbane International, defeating Milos Raonic in three tight sets the final. He couldn't carry the momentum into the Australian Open however, losing in the third round against Andreas Seppi, bringing to an end his record streak of 11 consecutive semifinal appearances in Melbourne. Federer rebounded well in Dubai, reaching his second final of the season, and subsequently defeating Novak Djokovic to win the title in Dubai for the unprecedented seventh time. After skipping the first round of the Davis Cup, Federer reached the final in Indian Wells for a record sixth time, however lost to Djokovic in three sets. After an early exit in Monte-Carlo against Gaël Monfils, Federer won the third title of his season, at the inaugural Istanbul Open, defeating Pablo Cuevas in the final. An opening round loss to Nick Kyrgios in Madrid was followed by reaching another final in Rome, losing again to Djokovic, this time in straight sets. At the French Open he made the quarterfinals, losing to eventual champion Stan Wawrinka in straight sets. During the grass court season, Federer won a record eighth title in Halle, defeating Seppi in the final.

Doubles

# Players Points Tours Date qualified
1  Bob Bryan (USA)
 Mike Bryan (USA)
6,105 16 17 August[11]
2  Jean-Julien Rojer (NED)
 Horia Tecau (ROM)
5,770 17 2 October [12]
3  Ivan Dodig (CRO)
 Marcelo Melo (BRA)
5,140 12 18 October[13]
4  Jamie Murray (GBR)
 John Peers (AUS)
5,125 23 18 October[13]
5  Simone Bolelli (ITA)
 Fabio Fognini (ITA)
4,895 15 18 October[13]
6  Pierre-Hugues Herbert (FRA)
 Nicolas Mahut (FRA)
4,765 13 18 October[13]
7  Marcin Matkowski (POL)
 Nenad Zimonjić (SRB)
4,200 18 26 October[14]

On the 17 August, Bob and Mike Bryan became the first doubles team to qualify, following their triumph at the Rogers Cup.[11]

Bob and Mike Bryan had a difficult start to their 2015 season, losing their opening match in Auckland to Andre Begemann and Robin Haase, despite being match point up at one point, a dubious line call costing them said point and the match.[15] This was followed by a shock third round loss at the Australian Open to Dominic Inglot and Florin Mergea, the first time since 2001 that the Bryans had made consecutive pre-quarterfinal exits at a Major. They won their first title of the year by successfully defending their title at Delray Beach, defeating Raven Klaasen and Leander Paes in the final, however lost in the quarterfinals in Dubai, losing once again to Inglot and Mergea. The Bryans won their doubles rubber in the Davis Cup first round, however the USA ended up losing the tie to Great Britain. After a semifinal loss in Indian Wells to Vasek Pospisil and Jack Sock, the Bryans successfully defended their title in Miami, getting revenge on Pospisil and Sock en route.[16] After a quarterfinal loss in Houston, the earliest at an ATP 250 series tournament since 2006, Bob and Mike successfully defended their title in Monte-Carlo, defeating Australian Open champions Simone Bolelli and Fabio Fognini in the final. The Bryans lost their opening match in both Madrid and Rome, however they then went on to reach their sixth French Open final, losing to Ivan Dodig and Marcelo Melo in a tight three-set battle despite leading by a set and a break midway through the second set. After losing in the quarterfinals at Wimbledon to Rohan Bopanna and Mergea, the Bryans went on a run of 12 matches unbeaten at the start of the North American hard court season, winning three titles including the Rogers Cup, defeating Daniel Nestor and Édouard Roger-Vasselin in the final. Bob and Mike Bryan have qualified for the thirteenth time as a team, an all-time record.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Home | Barclays ATP World Tour Finals". Atpworldtour.com. 2013-10-27. Retrieved 2013-10-31. 
  2. ^ "Andy Murray avoids the world No1 Novak Djokovic in ATP finals draw". Guardian. 3 November 2014. Retrieved 11 November 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "2015 ATP World Tour Rulebook". ATP World Tour. 
  4. ^ "Live ATP Race". Live Tennis Rankings. Retrieved 26 October 2015. 
  5. ^ a b "Djokovic First to Qualify". ATP. Retrieved 4 June 2015. 
  6. ^ a b "Murray Qualifies for Final Showdown". ATP. Retrieved 15 August 2015. 
  7. ^ "Federer Qualifies For 2015 Barclays ATP World Tour Finals". ATP. Retrieved 8 September 2015. 
  8. ^ "Wawrinka Qualifies For Barclays ATP World Tour Finals". ATP World Tour. Retrieved 10 September 2015. 
  9. ^ a b "Nadal And Berdych Qualify For Barclays ATP World Tour Finals". ATP. Retrieved 19 October 2015. 
  10. ^ a b "Ferrer , Nishikori Complete Barclays ATP World Tour Finals Field". ATP. Retrieved 31 October 2015. 
  11. ^ a b "Bryans Qualify For Final Showdown". Retrieved 17 August 2015. 
  12. ^ "Rojer/Tecau Qualify For Barclays ATP World Tour Finals". ATP. Retrieved 14 October 2015. 
  13. ^ a b c d "Doubles Teams Qualify For Barclays ATP World Tour Finals". ATP. 18 October 2015. Retrieved 22 October 2015. 
  14. ^ "Matkowski/Zimonjic London-Bound". ATP World Tour. Retrieved 27 October 2015. 
  15. ^ "Bryan Brothers out of Heineken Open after dubious line call". Retrieved January 14, 2015. 
  16. ^ "BRYAN BROTHERS CLAIM FOURTH MIAMI CROWN". ATP Tennis. Retrieved April 4, 2015. 

External links

  • Official website
  • ATP tournament profile
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