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300 Win Club

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300 Win Club

A black-and-white photograph of a man from the chest up looking to his right, wearing a baseball uniform with the letters
Cy Young is the all-time leader in wins.

In Major League Baseball, the 300 win club is the group of pitchers who have won 300 or more games. Twenty-four pitchers have reached this milestone. Early in the history of professional baseball, many of the rules favored the pitcher over the batter; the distance pitchers threw to home plate was shorter than today, and pitchers were able to use foreign substances to alter the direction of the ball.[1] The first player to win 300 games was Pud Galvin in 1888. Seven pitchers recorded all or the majority of their career wins in the 19th century: Galvin, Cy Young, Kid Nichols, Tim Keefe, John Clarkson, Charley Radbourn, and Mickey Welch.[2] Four more pitchers joined the club in the first quarter of the 20th century: Christy Mathewson, Walter Johnson, Eddie Plank, and Grover Cleveland Alexander.[1] Young is the all-time leader in wins with 511, a mark that is considered unbreakable.[3] If a modern-day pitcher won 20 games per season for 25 seasons, he would still be 11 games short of Young's mark.

Only three pitchers, Lefty Grove, Warren Spahn, and Early Wynn, joined the 300 win club between 1924 and 1982, which may be explained by a number of factors: the abolition of the spitball,[1][1] World War II military service, such as Bob Feller's,[5] and the growing importance of the home run in the game.[1] As the home run became commonplace, the physical and mental demands on pitchers dramatically increased, which led to the use of a four-man starting rotation.[1][2] Between 1982 and 1990, the 300 win club gained six members: Gaylord Perry, Phil Niekro, Steve Carlton, Nolan Ryan, Don Sutton and Tom Seaver.[2] These pitchers benefited from the increased use of specialized relief pitchers, an expanded strike zone, and new stadiums, including Shea Stadium, Dodger Stadium and the Astrodome, that were pitcher's parks, which suppressed offensive production.[2] Also, the increasing sophistication of training methods and sports medicine, such as Tommy John surgery, allowed players to maintain a high competitive level for a longer time.[6] Randy Johnson, for example, won more games in his 40s than he did in his 20s.[7]

Since 1990, only four pitchers have joined the 300 win club: Roger Clemens, Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, and Johnson. Changes in the game in the last decade of the 20th century have made attaining 300 career wins difficult, perhaps more so than during the mid 20th century.[8] The four-man starting rotation has given way to a five-man rotation, which gives starting pitchers fewer chances to pick up wins.[2] No pitcher reached 20 wins in a non strike-shortened year for the first time in 2006; this was repeated in 2009.[9]

Recording 300 career wins has been seen as a guaranteed admission to the Baseball Hall of Fame.[10][11][12] All pitchers with 300 wins have been elected to the Hall of Fame[13] except for Clemens, who received only half of the vote total needed for induction in his first appearance on the Hall of Fame ballot in 2013[14] and lost votes from that total in 2014.[15] Clemens' future election is seen as uncertain because of his alleged links to use of performance-enhancing drugs.[16] To be eligible for the Hall of Fame, a player must have "been retired five seasons" or deceased for at least six months,[17] Many observers expect the club to gain few, if any, members in the foreseeable future.[13][18][19] Ten members of the 300 win club are also members of the 3,000 strikeout club.[20]

Contents

  • Members 1
  • See also 2
  • Notes 3
  • References 4

Members

A black-and-white photograph of a man in a white baseball uniform with the letter
Kid Nichols was the youngest pitcher to win 300 games, achieving the feat at age 30.[21]

A man in a white baseball uniform with the word
Randy Johnson is the most recent member of the 300 win club.

Key
Pitcher Name of the pitcher
Wins Career wins
Date Date of the player's 300th win
Team The pitcher's team for his 300th win
Seasons The seasons this player played in the major leagues
Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
Members of the 300 win club
Pitcher Wins Date Team Seasons Ref
Young, CyCy Young 511 July 12, 1901 Boston Americans 1890–1911 [22]
Johnson, WalterWalter Johnson 417 May 14, 1920 Washington Senators 1907–1927 [23]
Alexander, Grover ClevelandGrover Cleveland Alexander 373 September 20, 1924 Chicago Cubs 1911–1930 [24]
Mathewson, ChristyChristy Mathewson 373 June 13, 1912 New York Giants 1900–1916 [25]
Galvin, PudPud Galvin 365 September 4, 1888 Pittsburgh Alleghenys 1875–1892 [26]
Spahn, WarrenWarren Spahn 363 August 11, 1961 Milwaukee Braves 1942–1965 [27]
Nichols, KidKid Nichols 361 July 7, 1900 Boston Beaneaters 1890–1906 [28]
Maddux, GregGreg Maddux 355 August 7, 2004 Chicago Cubs 1986–2008 [29]
Clemens, RogerRoger Clemens 354 June 13, 2003 New York Yankees 1984–2007 [30]
Keefe, TimTim Keefe 342 June 4, 1890 New York Giants (PL) 1880–1893 [31]
Carlton, SteveSteve Carlton 329 September 23, 1983 Philadelphia Phillies 1965–1988 [32]
Clarkson, JohnJohn Clarkson 328 September 21, 1892 Cleveland Spiders 1882–1894 [33]
Plank, EddieEddie Plank 326 September 11, 1915 St. Louis Terriers 1901–1917 [34]
Ryan, NolanNolan Ryan 324 July 31, 1990 Texas Rangers 1966, 1968–1993 [35]
Sutton, DonDon Sutton 324 June 18, 1986 California Angels 1966–1988 [36]
Niekro, PhilPhil Niekro 318 October 6, 1985 New York Yankees 1964–1987 [37]
Perry, GaylordGaylord Perry 314 May 6, 1982 Seattle Mariners 1962–1983 [38]
Seaver, TomTom Seaver 311 August 4, 1985 Chicago White Sox 1967–1986 [39]
Radbourn, CharlesCharles Radbourn 309 June 2, 1891 Cincinnati Reds 1880–1891 [40]
Welch, MickeyMickey Welch 307 July 28, 1890 New York Giants 1880–1892 [41]
Glavine, TomTom Glavine 305 August 5, 2007 New York Mets 1987–2008 [42]
Johnson, RandyRandy Johnson 303 June 4, 2009 San Francisco Giants 1988–2009 [43]
Wynn, EarlyEarly Wynn 300 July 13, 1963 Cleveland Indians 1939–1963 [44]
Grove, LeftyLefty Grove 300 July 25, 1941 Boston Red Sox 1925–1941 [45]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Though it is illegal to doctor the baseball, Don Sutton and Gaylord Perry, members of the 300 win club and Hall of Fame, were widely suspected of this behavior.[4]

References

General

  • "Career Leaders & Records for Wins". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 6, 2010. 
  • "300 Wins Club". Baseball-Almanac.com. Baseball Almanac. Archived from the original on 26 July 2010. Retrieved August 6, 2010. 

Specific

  1. ^ a b c d e Amore, Don (June 16, 2003). "Breaking Down The 300 Club".  
  2. ^ a b c d e Barra, Allen (May 26, 2003). "Baseball; 300-Victory Club Becomes Tougher to Join".  
  3. ^ Harkins, Bob (September 27, 2011). "Not all records are made to be broken". NBC Sports.com. Retrieved September 20, 2012. 
  4. ^  
  5. ^  
  6. ^ Remington, Alex (April 9, 2010). "Presenting the Tommy John All-Stars". Yahoo! Sports ( 
  7. ^ McCauley, Janie. "Big Unit Approaches Big Number: Next Up, No. 300". Yahoo! Sports. June 1, 2009.
  8. ^ Singer, Tom (June 5, 2009). "Johnson could close out the 300 club". MLB.com. Retrieved September 8, 2012. 
  9. ^ Newman, Mark (October 3, 2009). "MLB denied 20-game winner in '09". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved August 3, 2012. 
  10. ^ Sessa, Danielle (March 30, 2007). "Mets' Glavine Nears 300 Wins, With Only Johnson, Mussina Close".  
  11. ^ "Yankees, Henderson continuing talks". Record-Journal.  
  12. ^ Weir, Tom (January 2, 1998). "3,000 hits, 500 HRs, 300 wins just about guarantee Hall entry".   (subscription required)
  13. ^ a b  
  14. ^ "2013 Hall of Fame Vote a Shutout" (Press release). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. January 9, 2013. Retrieved January 9, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Maddux, Glavine, Thomas to HOF". ESPN.com. January 8, 2014. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  16. ^ Kurkjian, Tim (January 9, 2012). "Whopper of a list of names await in 2013".  
  17. ^ "Rules for Election". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on 30 May 2010. Retrieved June 21, 2010. 
  18. ^ Bierman, Fred (May 9, 2009). "Johnson Is Next, and Possibly Last, in Line to Win 300". The New York Times. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  19. ^ Bishop, Greg (June 2, 2009). "Johnson Quietly Nears a Defining Moment". The New York Times. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  20. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Strikeouts".  
  21. ^ O'Malley, John J. "Nichols Youngest to Win 300: "Kid" in More Ways than Won".  
  22. ^ "Cy Young Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  23. ^ "Walter Johnson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  24. ^ "Pete Alexander Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on September 6, 2010. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  25. ^ "Christy Mathewson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  26. ^ "Pud Galvin Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  27. ^ "Warren Spahn Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  28. ^ "Kid Nichols Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  29. ^ "Greg Maddux Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  30. ^ "Roger Clemens Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  31. ^ "Tim Keefe Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  32. ^ "Steve Carlton Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  33. ^ "John Clarkson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  34. ^ "Eddie Plank Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  35. ^ "Nolan Ryan Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  36. ^ "Don Sutton Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  37. ^ "Phil Niekro Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  38. ^ "Gaylord Perry Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  39. ^ "Tom Seaver Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  40. ^ "Old Hoss Radbourn Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  41. ^ "Mickey Welch Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  42. ^ "Tom Glavine Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  43. ^ "Randy Johnson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  44. ^ "Early Wynn Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
  45. ^ "Lefty Grove Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2010. 
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