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42nd Street – Bryant Park (IND Sixth Avenue Line)

 

42nd Street – Bryant Park (IND Sixth Avenue Line)

42nd Street / Fifth Avenue – Bryant Park
Template:NYCS Flushing south NYCS B NYCS D NYCS F NYCS M
New York City Subway rapid transit station complex
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An entrance to the IND station.
Station statistics
Address West 42nd Street between Fifth Avenue & Sixth Avenue
New York, NY 10036
Borough Manhattan
Locale Midtown Manhattan
Coordinates

40°45′17″N 73°59′03″W / 40.754799°N 73.984208°W / 40.754799; -73.984208Coordinates: 40°45′17″N 73°59′03″W / 40.754799°N 73.984208°W / 40.754799; -73.984208

Division A (IRT), B (IND)
Line       IND Sixth Avenue Line
      IRT Flushing Line
Services Template:NYCS Flushing south
      B weekdays until 11:00 p.m. (weekdays until 11:00 p.m.)
      D all times (all times)
      F all times (all times)
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m. (weekdays until 11:00 p.m.)
Connection

  • New York City Bus: BxM2, M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M7, M42, Q32, X17, X22, X30, X31
  • MTA Bus: QM1, QM2, QM3, QM4, QM5, QM6, QM20
Structure Underground
Levels 2
Traffic
Passengers (2012)14,917,245 (station complex)[1] Increase 1.1%
Rank 18 out of 421

42nd Street / Fifth Avenue – Bryant Park is an underground New York City Subway station complex, consisting of stations on the IRT Flushing Line and IND Sixth Avenue Line, formerly without direct connection, now connected by a pedestrian tunnel. Located at 42nd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues in Manhattan, it is served by the:

  • 7, D, and F trains at all times
  • B and M trains on weekdays
  • <7> train on weekdays in the peak direction

Free transfers between the two stations were in effect from December 16, 1967, until 1968, by providing paper tickets to passengers, who would exit one station and follow the sidewalk in order to enter the other. The tunnel now permits leaving a train in one station and walking underground to one in the other, and takes away the need for transfer tickets. The entire station complex was fully renovated in 1998.


IND Sixth Avenue Line platforms

42nd Street – Bryant Park
NYCS B NYCS D NYCS F NYCS M
New York City Subway rapid transit station
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Station statistics
Division B (IND)
Line       IND Sixth Avenue Line
Services       B weekdays until 11:00 p.m. (weekdays until 11:00 p.m.)
      D all times (all times)
      F all times (all times)
      M weekdays until 11:00 p.m. (weekdays until 11:00 p.m.)
Platforms 2 island platforms
cross-platform interchange
Tracks 4
Other information
Opened December 15, 1940; 73 years ago (1940-12-15)
Station succession
Next north 47th–50th Streets – Rockefeller Center: B weekdays until 11:00 p.m. D all times F all times M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
Next south 34th Street – Herald Square: B weekdays until 11:00 p.m. D all times F all times M weekdays until 11:00 p.m.

42nd Street – Bryant Park, opened on December 15, 1940, on the IND Sixth Avenue Line is an express station, with four tracks and two island platforms. B and D trains stop at the inner express tracks while F and M trains stop at the outer local tracks.

Both outer track walls have a scarlet red trim line with a chocolate brown border and small white "42" signs on a black background below them at regular intervals. Red i-beam columns run along both sides of both platforms at regular intervals with alternating ones having the standard black station name plate in white lettering. Some of the columns between the express tracks have black "42" signs on a white background.

This station has a full length mezzanine above the platforms and tracks. It originally extended south from 42nd Street to the 34th Street – Herald Square station, with additional entrances at 38th Street. The passageway was long, dim, and lightly traveled, and it was finally closed in 1991 after a series of rapes took place there.[2] It is now used for storage. The mezzanine has a florist, and orange I-beam columns and lit-up ads and space rentals along the walls.

On either ends of the mezzanine is a fare control area. The full-time side is at the north end. This is where the passageway to the IRT Flushing Line is. Two staircases from each platform go up to a turnstile bank, where outside there is a token booth, one staircase going up to the southwest corner of 42nd Street and Sixth Avenue, and a passageway through some abandoned ticket counters under 1095 Avenue of the Americas that lead to a staircase that goes up to the building's pedestrian plaza.

On the south end of the mezzanine, two staircases from each platform go up to an unstaffed bank of regular and HEET turnstiles. Outside fare control, there are four staircases going up to all corners of 40th Street and Sixth Avenue with the northwest one being built inside a building.

This station has another fare control area at its extreme north end. A staircase from each platform go up to a mezzanine, where a bank of regular and HEET turnstiles provide access to/from the station. Outside fare control, there is a Customer Assistance Booth and a staircase built inside 1100 Avenue of the Americas (HBO headquarters) that goes up to the northeast corner of 42nd Street and Sixth Avenue. Two modern, glass-enclosed staircases, and one elevator go up to the northwest corner of this intersection outside of the Bank of America building. However, because there are no elevators from the mezzanine to the platforms, the platforms themselves are not ADA-accessible.

South of this station, there are three sets of crossovers, allowing trains to switch between all four tracks. Those switches are not currently used in revenue service and are only used during train reroutes.

Platform layout (Sixth Avenue line)

L1 Street Level Exit/ Entrance
B1 Mezzanine Fare control, station agents
to Exits
Southbound platform Southbound local NYCS F towards Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue, NYCS M towards Middle Village – Metropolitan Avenue (34th Street – Herald Square)
Island platform, Doors will open on the left, right
Southbound express NYCS B towards Brighton Beach, NYCS D towards Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue (34th Street – Herald Square)
Northbound platform Northbound express NYCS B towards Bedford Park Boulevard or 145th Street, NYCS D towards Norwood – 205th Street (47th–50th Streets – Rockefeller Center)
Island platform, Doors will open on the left, right
Northbound local NYCS F towards Jamaica – 179th Street, NYCS M towards Forest Hills – 71st Avenue (47th-50th Streets - Rockefeller Center)


IRT Flushing Line platform

Fifth Avenue
Template:NYCS Flushing south
New York City Subway rapid transit station
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Entrance to the IRT section of the complex
Station statistics
Division A (IRT)
Line       IRT Flushing Line
Services Template:NYCS Flushing south
Platforms 1 island platform
Tracks 2
Other information
Opened March 22, 1926; 88 years ago (1926-03-22)
Former/other names Fifth Avenue – Bryant Park
Station succession
Next north Grand Central: Template:NYCS Flushing south
Next south Times Square: Template:NYCS Flushing south

Fifth Avenue (formerly Fifth Avenue – Bryant Park) on the IRT Flushing Line, opened on March 22, 1926, has two tracks and one island platform. The platform walls have a mosaic golden trimline with "5" tablets at regular intervals along it.

The station has a full length mezzanine directly above the platform and tracks. The full-time fare control is at the east end. A single stair on the southwest corner of Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street in front of the New York Public Library goes down to an area that has a full-time token booth and turnstile bank that leads to several staircases down to the platform. Towards the west end, the mezzanine splits in two with one portion becoming a down hill ramp where there is another staircases up from the platform before leading to the passageway to the IND Sixth Avenue Line. The portion of the mezzanine that curves up leads to some HEET turnstiles and a small fare control area. The two adjacent street stairs here have elaborate ironwork and go up to the south side 42nd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenue on the northern edge of Bryant Park.

The 2002 artwork here is called Under Byrant Park by Samm Kuce. It is located in the transfer passageway and consists of glass mosiac and etched granite depicting roots of trees with various literacy quotes.


Platform layout

G
Street level
B1 Mezzanine Entrance/Exit, station agent, passageway to Sixth Avenue line
B2
Platforms
Southbound NYCS 7 NYCS 7d toward Times Square – 42nd Street (Terminus)
Island platform, Doors will open on the left
Northbound NYCS 7 NYCS 7d toward Flushing – Main Street (Grand Central – 42nd Street)


References

External links

Template:Sister-inline

  • nycsubway.org—IRT Flushing Line: 5th Avenue
  • nycsubway.org—IND Sixth Avenue: 42nd Street/Bryant Park
  • nycsubway.org — Early Color Artwork by Saul Leiter (2007)
  • nycsubway.org — The Sixth Avenue Elevated, 1878 Artwork by W. P. Snyder (unknown date)
  • nycsubway.org — 42nd Street Nocturne Artwork by Lynn Saville (2006)
  • nycsubway.org — Under Bryant Park Artwork by Samm Kunce (unknown date)
  • nycsubway.org — Underground Exposure Artwork by Travis Ruse (2009)
  • Station Reporter — 42nd Street/Bryant Park Complex
  • MTA's Arts For Transit — 42nd Street – Bryant Park/5th Avenue
  • 42nd Street entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • park entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • 40th Street entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • Fifth Avenue entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • Sixth Avenue (west) entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • Sixth Avenue (east) entrance from Google Maps Street Viewes:Calle 42/Quinta Avenida–Bryant Park (estación)
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