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43rd Primetime Emmy Awards

43rd Primetime Emmy Awards
Date August 24, 1991
Location Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California
Host Dennis Miller
Television/Radio coverage
Network Fox
42nd Primetime Emmy Awards 44th >

The 43rd Primetime Emmy Awards were held on August 25, 1991. The ceremony was broadcast on Fox, from the Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California. The network TNT received its first major nomination at this ceremony.

In its ninth season Cheers won Outstanding Comedy Series for the fourth time, tying All in the Family's record. Cheers' spinoff Frasier would later break this record. Cheers also received the most major nominations (10) and major awards (4) during the ceremony. The Drama field also saw a four time winner crowned as L.A. Law won Outstanding Drama Series for the fourth time in five years, this tied the record set by Hill Street Blues whose four wins came consecutively. James Earl Jones joined an exclusive club, as he won two acting Emmy's for his work on two different series.

Contents

  • Winners and Nominees 1
    • Programs 1.1
    • Acting 1.2
      • Lead performances 1.2.1
      • Supporting performances 1.2.2
      • Guest performances 1.2.3
    • Directing 1.3
    • Writing 1.4
  • Most major nominations 2
  • Most major awards 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Winners and Nominees

[1][2][3]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Program Outstanding Drama/Comedy Special and Miniseries[note 1][4]

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
  • Timothy Busfield as Elliot Weston on thirtysomething, (Episode: "Second Look"), (ABC)
    • David Clennon as Miles Drentell on thirtysomething, (Episode: "Out the Door"), (ABC)
    • Richard Dysart as Leland McKenzie, Jr. on L.A. Law, (Episode: "The Beverly Hills Hangers"), (NBC)
    • Jimmy Smits as Victor Sifuentes on L.A. Law, (Episode: "God Rest Ye Murray Gentleman"), (NBC)
    • Dean Stockwell as Al Calavicci on Quantum Leap, (Episode: "The Leap Home: April 7, 1970: Part 2"), (NBC)
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Guest performances

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Jay Thomas as Jerry Gold on Murphy Brown, (Episode: "Gold Rush"), (CBS)
    • Sheldon Leonard as Sid Nelson on Cheers, (Episode: "Grease"), (NBC)
    • Alan Oppenheimer as Eugene Kinsella on Murphy Brown, (Episode: "Strike Two"), (CBS)
    • Tom Poston as Art Hibke on Coach, (Episode: "Diamond's Are A Dentist's Best Friend"), (ABC)
    • Danny Thomas as Dr. Leo Brewster on Empty Nest, (Episode: "The Mentor"), (NBC)
  • Colleen Dewhurst as Avery Brown on Murphy Brown, (Episode: "Bob And Murphy And Ted And Avery"), (CBS)
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series
  • David Opatoshu as Max Goldstein on Gabriel's Fire, (Episode: "A Prayer For The Goldsteins"), (ABC)
    • Dabney Coleman as Hugh Creighton on Columbo, (Episode: "Columbo and the Murder of a Rock Star"), (ABC)
    • Peter Coyote as Romney Penhallow on Road to Avonlea, (Episode: "Old Quarrels, Old Love"), (Disney)
    • John Glover as Dr. Paul Kohler on L.A. Law, (Episode: "God Rest Ye Murray Gentleman"), (NBC)
  • Peggy McCay as Irene Hayes on The Trials of Rosie O'Neill, (Episode: "State of Mind"), (CBS)
    • Eileen Brennan as Margaret Weston on thirtysomething, (Episode: "Sifting The Ashes"), (ABC)
    • Colleen Dewhurst as Marilla Cuthbert on Road to Avonlea, (Episode: "The Materializing Of Duncan McTavish"), (Disney)
    • Penny Fuller as Mary Margaret McMurphy on China Beach, (Episode: "Fever"), (ABC)

Directing

Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series
Outstanding Directing in a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Directing in a Miniseries or a Special
  • Hal Gurnee for Late Night with David Letterman, (NBC)
    • Dwight Hemion for The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts, (CBS)
    • Jeff Margolis for The 63rd Annual Academy Awards, (ABC)

Writing

Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series
  • Gary Dontzig, Steven Peterman for Murphy Brown, (Episode: "Jingle Hell, Jingle Hell, Jingle All The Way"), (CBS)
    • Larry David for Seinfeld, (Episode: "The Deal"), (NBC)
    • Larry David, Jerry Seinfeld for Seinfeld, (Episode: "The Pony Remark"), (NBC)
    • Diane English for Murphy Brown, (Episode: "On Another Plane"), (CBS)
    • Jay Tarses for The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd, (Episode: "Here's A Little Touch Of Harry In The Night"), (Lifetime)
Outstanding Writing in a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Writing in a Miniseries or a Special
  • The 63rd Annual Academy Awards, (ABC)
    • In Living Color, (Fox)
    • Saturday Night Live, (NBC)
    • The Muppets Celebrate Jim Henson, (CBS)
    • Late Night with David Letterman, (NBC)

Most major nominations

By network [note 2]
  • NBC – 46
  • ABC – 36
  • CBS – 31
By program
  • Cheers (NBC) – 10
  • L.A. Law (NBC) / Murphy Brown (CBS) – 9
  • thirtysomething (ABC) – 7

Most major awards

By network [note 2]
  • ABC – 10
  • NBC – 8
  • CBS – 5
  • HBO / PBS – 2
By program
  • Cheers (NBC) – 4
  • Gabriel's Fire (ABC) / Murphy Brown (CBS) – 3
Notes
  1. ^ For this year only, the Outstanding Drama/Comedy Special and Outstanding Miniseries were combined so that TV Movies and Miniseries competed in the same category.
  2. ^ a b "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

References

  1. ^ "Primetime Emmy Awards (1991)". imdb.com. Retrieved 2013-04-19. 
  2. ^ "Primetime Emmy Awards nominations for 1991". Emmys.com. Retrieved 2013-05-09. 
  3. ^ "1990–1991 Emmy Awards". infoplease.com. Retrieved 2013-05-09. 
  4. ^ "43rd Primetime Emmys Nominees and Winners".  

External links

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