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4th Space Control Squadron

4th Space Control Squadron
4th Space Control Squadron emblem
Active 1986–Present
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
Type Space Control
Role Offensive Counterspace[1]
Part of 21st Space Wing/AFSPC
Garrison/HQ Holloman AFB, New Mexico[2]
Nickname "Space Pirates"[3]
Engagements Operation Iraqi Freedom[4][5][6]
Decorations

Meritorious Unit Award

AFOUA

The United States Air Force's 4th Space Control Squadron (4 SPCS) is an offensive space control unit[1] located at Holloman AFB, New Mexico.[2]

Contents

  • Mission 1
  • History 2
    • Emblem 2.1
  • Previous designations 3
  • Assignments 4
  • Locations 5
    • Detachments 5.1
  • Commanders 6
  • Systems Operated 7
  • Decorations 8
  • Photo gallery 9
  • See also 10
  • References 11
  • External links 12

Mission

The 4th SPCS is an Air Force Space Command unit responsible for delivering defensive and offensive counterspace and space situational awareness, as appropriate, to rapidly achieve flexible and versatile effects in support of global and theater campaigns.[7]

The 4 SPCS provides combat space superiority effects to the Commander, Joint Functional Component Command for Space, and theater Combatant Commanders through operation of the Counter Communications System.

History[8]

The unit initially activated in September 1986 as Det. 2, 6960th Electronic Security Wing and provided training for Electronic Security Command. It was reassigned to Headquarters, Continental Electronic Security Division in October 1986 and was reassigned again, this time to Headquarters, Space Electronic Security Division in May 1988. In May 1989, it was reorganized under the 694th Electronic Security Wing.

The Low Altitude Space Surveillance system (LASS) was activated by Air Force Space Command in October 1990. The unit was named the 4th Surveillance Squadron. One year later, it was redesignated as the 4th Space Surveillance Squadron. During this time, the unit continued to perform a research and development mission and a mission to train newly assigned LASS operators until April 1993. The 4th SPSS also performed mobile space surveillance communications and space data relay.[9]

The squadron was assigned to the 73d Space Surveillance Group and in April 1995 merged with the 21st Space Wing. In April 1996, the unit moved operations from its home at Lackland AFB, Texas, to Holloman AFB, New Mexico, its present location. The unit was redesignated as the 4th Space Control Squadron in February 2003. The 4th SPCS transitioned to a counterspace mission in July 2005, and activated its first Counter Communications System on 11 April 2006.

Emblem

Azure (Dark Blue) a demi-globe issuant from base Celeste, gridlined Azure below an eagle volant proper above in dexter base three mullet of four in bend sinister Or, all within a diminished border of the third. Approved on 5 June 1995.

Previous designations

Assignments

Locations

Detachments

Commanders

  • Lt Col Scott D. Brodeur (2012–Present)
  • Lt Col E. Marcus Caughey (2010- 2012)
  • Lt Col Carl M. Jones (2008-2010)[7]
  • Lt Col Daniel A. Dant (2006-2008)[15]
  • Lt Col Fred W. Gaudlip (2004–2006)
  • Lt Col James Wolf (circa 2002–2004)[16]
  • Lt Col Stephen M. Tanous (2000–2002)[17]
  • Lt Col Jonathan Watkins (1998–2000)
  • Lt Col Cameron Bowser (1996–1998)
  • Lt Col James G. Lee (circa 1996)[18]

Systems Operated

  • Counter Communications System (2006–Present)[7][19]
  • Low Altitude Space Surveillance System (1986–2006)[13]

Decorations

Photo gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ a b This story was written by Lt. Col. Daniel Dant (14 September 2006). """Holloman AFB: "Commentary: Commanding with a vision key to good leadership. Holloman.af.mil. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Peterson AFB: 21st Space Wing Units
  3. ^ 21st Space Wing Public Affairs: "Space Observer Commander's Corner, 18 Oct 2007"
  4. ^ 379th AEW Public Affairs: "Silent Sentry contributes to ops throughout the AOR"
  5. ^ 21st Space Wing Public Affairs: "4th SPCS honored during welcome home parade"
  6. ^ "Temple University Center For The Study Of Force And Diplomacy: Major Grant Weller Bio". Temple.edu. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  7. ^ a b c "Peterson AFB: 4th Space Control Squadron Factsheet". Peterson.af.mil. 11 April 2006. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  8. ^ "Ibid". Peterson.af.mil. 11 April 2006. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  9. ^ John Pike. "21st Space Wing". Globalsecurity.org. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  10. ^ "Air Force Space Command Public Affairs: Space Almanac 2007" (PDF). Archived from the original on 29 July 2010. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  11. ^ "Department of Defense News Release No. 365-95 (June 30, 1995)". Defenselink.mil. 12 March 2009. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  12. ^ 2006 Varay Systems - www.varay.com. "El Paso Regional Economic Development Corporation". Elpasoredco.org. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  13. ^ a b "Air University: 21st Space Wing Overview". Au.af.mil. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  14. ^ Government Publishing Office: Air Force Directory
  15. ^ This story was written by Lt. Col. Daniel Dant (14 September 2006). "Ibid". Holloman.af.mil. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  16. ^ "Space Observer 22 May 2003" (PDF). Archived from the original on 21 September 2010. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  17. ^ "Official Biography (Mar 2007)". Vandenberg.af.mil. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  18. ^ AFHRA FOIA Req 09-0061: 21st Space Wing Roster of Key Personnel (as of 31 Dec 1996)
  19. ^ Pentagon's Plans for "Space Control", 26 Jan 2007""". DefenseTech.org. 26 January 2007. Retrieved 6 September 2010. 
  20. ^ AFSPC Special Order GA-10, 2001
  21. ^ AFSPC Special Order GA-97, 2000
  22. ^ AFSPC Special Order GA-62, 6 Dec 1999
  23. ^ AFSPC Special Order GA-58, 6 Dec 1999
  24. ^ AFSPC Special Order GA-09, 1 Nov 1997

External links

  • 49th Fighter Wing Public Affairs: Holloman AFB Homepage
  • USAF Engineers.com: 4th Space Control Squadron
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