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50th Primetime Emmy Awards

 

50th Primetime Emmy Awards

50th Primetime Emmy Awards
Date
  • September 13, 1998 (Ceremony)
  • August 29, 1998 (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, California
Host Trey Parker & Matt Stone (Creative Arts Awards)
Television/Radio coverage
Network NBC
Producer Don Mischer

The 50th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards were held Sunday, September 13, 1998. It was broadcast on NBC. Nominees and winners are listed below, winners are in bold.

When Frasier was announced as the winner of Outstanding Comedy Series, Emmy history was made. the NBC sitcom became the first show to win one of the two main series prizes five consecutive years. This record has since been passed by The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, whose current winning streak is ten years, but for the main two genres, it was not matched until 2014, when the ABC sitcom Modern Family won its fifth consecutive award in the Outstanding Comedy Series category.

The Practice won Outstanding Drama Series and tied for the most major wins overall with three. For the second straight year, medical drama ER came into the night as the most nominated program, but once again walked away empty handed, going 0/9 in major categories.

Ally McBeal became the first hour-long series to be nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series since Love, American Style in 1971.

This year saw the Emmys move to a new venue, the Shrine Auditorium, marking the return of the award ceremony to Los Angeles for the first time since the 1976 Emmy Awards, following a 20-year residency at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium outside L.A. in Pasadena.

Contents

  • Winners and Nominees 1
    • Programs 1.1
    • Acting 1.2
      • Lead performances 1.2.1
      • Supporting performances 1.2.2
      • Guest performances 1.2.3
    • Directing 1.3
    • Writing 1.4
  • Most major nominations 2
  • Most major awards 3
  • In Memoriam 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Winners and Nominees

[1]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Special
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie
  • George C. Scott as Juror #3 on 12 Angry Men, (Showtime)

Guest performances

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Mel Brooks as Uncle Phil on Mad About You, (Episode: "Uncle Phil And The Coupons"), (NBC)
    • Hank Azaria as Nat on Mad About You, (Episode: "Nat and Arly"), (NBC)
    • Lloyd Bridges as Izzy Mandelbaum on Seinfeld, (Episode: "The Blood"), (NBC)
    • John Cleese as Dr. Neesam on 3rd Rock from the Sun, (Episode: "Dick and the Other Guy"), (NBC)
    • Nathan Lane as Professor Twilley on Mad About You, (Episode: "Good Old Reliable Nathan"), (NBC)
  • Emma Thompson as Herself on Ellen, (Episode: "Emma"), (ABC)
    • Carol Burnett as Teresa on Mad About You, (Episode: "Coming Home"), (NBC)
    • Jan Hooks as Vicki Dubcek on 3rd Rock from the Sun, (Episode: "Eat, Drink, Dick, Mary"), (NBC)
    • Patti LuPone as Zora on Frasier, (Episode: "Beware of Greeks"), (NBC)
    • Bette Midler as Caprice Feldman on Murphy Brown, (Episode: "Never Can Say Goodbye"), (CBS)
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series

Directing

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
  • Todd Holland, for The Larry Sanders Show, (Episode: "Flip"), (HBO)
    • Allan Arkush for Ally McBeal, (Episode: "Cro-Magnon"), (Fox)
    • James Burrows for Dharma & Greg, (Episode: "Pilot"), (ABC)
    • James Frawley for Ally McBeal, (Episode: "Pilot"), (Fox)
    • Terry Hughes, for 3rd Rock from the Sun, (Episode: "Dick and the Other Guy"), (NBC)
Outstanding Directing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries or Movie

Writing

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Writing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries or Movie

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
  • NBC – 49
  • HBO – 29
  • ABC – 25
  • CBS – 19
  • Fox – 13
By program
  • ER (NBC) – 9
  • NYPD Blue (ABC) – 8
  • The Larry Sanders Show (HBO) / The X-Files (Fox) – 7
  • 3rd Rock from the Sun (NBC) / Frasier (NBC) / Mad About You (NBC) / Merlin (NBC) – 6

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
  • ABC – 9
  • NBC – 7
  • HBO – 7
  • CBS – 5
  • TNT – 2
By program
  • Frasier (NBC) / George Wallace (HBO) / NYPD Blue (ABC) / The Practice (ABC) – 3
  • Don King: Only in America (HBO) / The Larry Sanders Show (HBO) / Mad About You (NBC) – 2
Notes
  1. ^ a b "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

In Memoriam

Patrick Stewart presented a clip tribute to the TV actors who had died: Red Skelton, Shari Lewis, Lloyd Bridges, Roy Rogers, singer John Denver, Robert Young, dancer Jerome Robbins, sports narrator Harry Caray, Frank Sinatra, singer Buffalo Bob, E. G. Marshall, J. T. Walsh, Sonny Bono, Phil Hartman and Chris Farley.

References

  1. ^

External links

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