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542d Combat Sustainment Wing

542d Combat Sustainment Wing
A member of a Navy SEAL team climbs aboard a 1550th Combat Crew Training Wing MH-53J Pave Low III helicopter at Elephant Butte Lake
Active 1943–1945, 1971–1994, 2005–2010
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Role Logistics Support
Part of Air Force Materiel Command
Engagements European Theater of World War II
Decorations Air Force Outstanding Unit Award
Commanders
Notable
commanders
General Hunter Harris, Jr.
Insignia
542d Combat Sustainment Wing emblem (approved 9 June 2005)[1]

The 542d Combat Sustainment Wing is an inactive wing of the United States Air Force last stationed at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia. It was inactivated in June 2010.

The wing was first organized in England as the 92d Bombardment Wing, a heavy bombardment headquarters of VIII Bomber Command during World War II and took part in the air offensive against Germany until the surrender of Germany in 1945.

In 1973 Military Airlift Command (MAC) activated the 1550th Aircrew Test and Training Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The wing trained aircrews for MAC, Air Mobility Command and Air Education and Training Command from 1971 to 1994 for search and rescue and special operations missions. In 1991 the wing was renumbered and consolidated with the 92d Bombardment Wing as the 542d Crew Training Wing. It was inactivated in 1994 and its mission, personnel and equipment transferred to the 58th Special Operations Wing, which was simultaneously activated.

The wing was redesignated the 542d Combat Sustainment Wing in 2005 and activated as a logistics support organization s part of the Air Force Materiel Command Transformation project.

Contents

  • History 1
    • World War II 1.1
    • Crew Training 1.2
    • Logistics Operations 1.3
  • Lineage 2
    • Assignments 2.1
    • Stations 2.2
    • Components 2.3
      • Groups 2.3.1
      • Squadrons 2.3.2
    • Aircraft 2.4
    • Awards 2.5
  • References 3
    • Notes 3.1
    • Bibliography 3.2
  • External links 4

History

World War II

The wing was originally organized in 1943 as the 92d Bombardment Wing,[2] an operational command wing for Eighth Air Force. The wing entered combat on 11 December 1943, but its groups were withdrawn and it was not operational again until May 1944, although it conducted flying training operations in April.[1] The wing flew in combat in the European Theater until November 1944 when its assigned bombardment groups were attached to another wing.[1] In February 1945 the groups were reassigned.[3] The wing returned to the United States in July 1945 and was disbanded the following month.[3]

Crew Training

emblem approved 30 Aug 1972 for the 1550th Wing, retained by the 542d Crew Training Wing

The 1550th Aircrew Test and Training Wing was activated in 1973 at Hill AFB, Utah, where it trained all USAF helicopter aircrews and trained HC-130 crews for search and rescue missions. It also provided pararescue training and, operational test and evaluation of materiel, and performed local search and rescue missions.[1] It moved to Kirtland AFB, New Mexico. in 1976 and expanded its mission to include special operations training. By 1990, the wing's primary focus would be on special operations training.[4] In 1983, the wing deployed three aircraft to support Operation Urgent Fury, the invasion of Grenada in the Windward Islands.[5]

From 1984 it focused on the training mission and was redesignated the 1550th Combat Crew Training Wing. In 1991, as the Air Force abolished the MAJCON (four-digit) unit system, the wing was merged with the 92d Bombardment Wing and renamed the 542d Crew Training Wing. Along with the new name, the wing acquired three Desert Storm. Wing aircrews were responsible for the rescue of seven aircrew during the operation.[6] It also deployed personnel to support Operation Provide Hope in Somalia. At the start of 1993, Kirtland AFB transferred to Air Force Materiel Command, and the wing lost its responsibility to act as host together with two of its groups.[7]

With General Merrill McPeak's call to retain historic United States Air Force units on the active list, the 542d was inactivated on 1 April 1994, while the newly redesignated 58th Special Operations Wing took over its training mission.[8]

Logistics Operations

The wing was again activated in 2005 as the 542d Combat Sustainment Wing as part of the Air Force Materiel Command Transformation project, which replaced the staff agencies at Air Logistics Centers with wings, groups, and squadrons. Its mission was to design, acquire, install, and sustain electronic warfare, avionics, support equipment, vehicles, missiles, automatic test systems and weapons. It was responsible for supply chain management for F-15, C-130 and C-5 aircraft and provided calibration standards and certification of Precision Measurement Laboratories worldwide. It was responsible for life-cycle management of over 800 systems valued at over $56 Billion. Its 542d Combat Sustainment Group supported assugned electronic warfare systems, the 642d Combat Sustainment Group supported assigned support equipment systems, the 752d Combat Sustainment Group supported assigned electronics systems, the 762d Combat Sustainment Group managed logistics support for all assigned systems, and its 782d Combat Sustainment Group supported assigned armament systems. the 742d Combat Sustainment Group supported precision measurement equipment worldwide.[9]

Lineage

92d Bombardment Wing

  • Constituted as 92d Bombardment Wing (Heavy) on 25 October 1943
Activated on 1 November 1943
Redesignated 92d Combat Bombardment Wing, Heavy on 24 August 1944
Redesignated 92d Bombardment Wing, Heavy on 22 November 1944
Disbanded on 28 August 1945.[10]
  • Reconstituted on 31 July 1985 and redesignated 542d Combat Crew Training Wing
Consolidated with 1550th Combat Crew Training Wing on 1 October 1991[1]

1550th Combat Crew Training Wing

  • Designated as the 1550th Aircrew Test and Training Wing and activated on 1 April 1971
Redesignated 1550th Combat Crew Training Wing on 15 May 1984
Consolidated with the 542d Combat Crew Training Wing on 1 October 1991[1]

Consolidated Wing

  • Redesignated 542d Crew Training Wing on 1 October 1991
Inactivated on 1 April 1994
  • Redesignated 542d Combat Sustainment Wing on 31 January 2005
Activated on 4 March 2005.[1]
Inactivated on 30 June 2010

Assignments

Stations

  • Polebrook, England (Station 110),[12] 1 November 1943
  • Camp Blainey, England (Station 116), ca. 12 December 1943
  • Sudbury, England (Station 174), ca, 2 March 1944
  • Bury St Edmunds (Station 468), England, ca. 18 November 1944
  • Elveden Hall (Station 116), England, 12 February 1945 – ca. 13 July 1945
  • Sioux Falls Army Air Field, South Dakota, 23 July 1945 – 28 August 1945[10]
  • Hill AFB, Utah, 1 April 1971
  • Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 15 March 1976 – 1 April 1994
  • Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, 4 March 2005 – 30 Jun 2010[11]

Components

Groups

World War II

Crew Training

  • 542d Medical Group, 1 October 1991 – 1 January 1993
  • 542d Operations Group, 1 October 1991 – 1 October 1994
  • 542d Support Group, 1 October 1991 – 1 January 1993

Crew Training and Logistics Operations

  • 542d Logistics Group (later 542d Electronic Warfare Systems Sustainment Group, 542d Combat Sustainment Group), 1 October 1991 – 1 October 1994, 4 March 2005 – 30 June 2010
Logistics Operations

Squadrons

Aircraft

Awards

Award streamer Award Dates Notes
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 April 1974–31 March 1976 1550th Aircrew Test and Training Wing[1]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 April 1976–31 March 1978 1550th Aircrew Test and Training Wing[1]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 July 1985–30 June 1987 1550th Combat Crew Training Wing[1]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 July 1987–30 June 1989 1550th Combat Crew Training Wing[1]
Campaign Streamer Campaign Dates Notes
Air Offensive, Europe 2 November 1943-5 June 1944 92d Bombardment Wing[10]
Normandy 6 June 1944-24 July 1944 92d Bombardment Wing[10]
Northern France 25 July 1944-14 September 1944 92d Combat Bombardment Wing[10]
Rhineland 15 September 1944-21 March 1945 92d Combat Bombardment Wing (later 92d Bombardment Wing)[10]
Ardennes-Alsace 16 December 1944-25 January 1945 92d Bombardment Wing[10]

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n AFHRA Factsheet, 542d Combat Sustainment Wing 3/2/2009 (retrieved 31 December 2012)
  2. ^ This wing is not related to the  
  3. ^ a b Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1983) [1961]. Air Force Combat Units of World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. p. 411.  
  4. ^ Abstract, History of 1550th CCTW, Jan–Jun 1990 (retrieved 1 January 2013)
  5. ^ Abstract, History of 1550th ATTW Jul–Dec 1983 (retrieved 1 January 2013)
  6. ^ Abstract,, History of 542d CTW, Jan–Jun 1991 (retrieved 1 January 2013)
  7. ^ Abstract, History of 542d CTW Jul 1991 – Dec 1992 (retrieved 1 January 2013)
  8. ^ Blyth, Lance R. (2006). A Brief History of the 58th Special Operations Wing. Kirtland AFB, NM: History Office. 58th Special Operations Wing. p. vii. 
  9. ^ Briefing 542d Combat Sustainment Wing Requirement Symposium 2006 (retrieved 1 January 2013)
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h Lineage, Station, and Campaign information through 1945 are in Maurer, Combat Units, p. 411
  11. ^ a b c Lineage, Station, Aircraft, Assignment information not included in Maurer, Combat Units is from the AFHRA Factsheet through 2009
  12. ^ United Kingdom AAF station numbers are in Anderson, Capt. Barry (1985). Army Air Forces Stations: A Guide to the Stations Where U.S. Army Air Forces Personnel Served in the United Kingdom During World War II. Maxwell AFB, AL: Research Division, USAF Historical Research Center. Retrieved 7 July 2012. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f See Mueller, Robert (1989). Air Force Bases, Vol. I, Active Air Force Bases Within the United States of America on 17 September 1982. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. p. 244.  
  14. ^ a b c d Mueller, Air Force Bases, p. 293

Bibliography

  • Anderson, Capt. Barry (1985). Army Air Forces Stations: A Guide to the Stations Where U.S. Army Air Forces Personnel Served in the United Kingdom During World War II. Maxwell AFB, AL: Research Division, USAF Historical Research Center. Retrieved 7 July 2012. 
  • Blyth, Lance R. (2006). A Brief History of the 58th Special Operations Wing. Kirtland AFB, NM: History Office. 58th Special Operations Wing. 
  • Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1983) [1961]. Air Force Combat Units of World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History.  
  • Mueller, Robert (1989). Air Force Bases, Vol. I, Active Air Force Bases Within the United States of America on 17 September 1982. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History.  
  • Ravenstein, Charles A. (1984). Air Force Combat Wings, Lineage & Honors Histories 1947–1977. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History.  

Further reading

  • Rogers, Brian. (2005). United States Air Force Unit Designations Since 1978. Hinkley, UK: Midland Publications.  
  • World Airpower Journal. (1992). US Air Force Air Power Directory. Aerospace Publishing: London, UK. ISBN 1-880588-01-3

External links

  • , October 1989The MAC Flyer1550th Combat Crew Training Wing, (retrieved 1 Jan 2013)
  • Helis.com 1550th Aircew Training & Test Wing (retrieved 1 Jan 2013)
  • USAF Engineers: 542 CSW (link requires registration)
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