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8-Carboxamidocyclazocine

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8-Carboxamidocyclazocine

8-Carboxamidocyclazocine
Clinical data
Legal status
?
Identifiers
CAS number  YesY
ATC code ?
PubChem
Chemical data
Formula C19H26N2O 
Mol. mass 298.205 g/mol
 YesY   

8-Carboxamidocyclazocine (8-CAC) is an opioid analgesic drug related to cyclazocine, invented by medicinal chemist Mark P. Wentland and co-workers in Cogswell Laboratory at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.[1] Similarly to cyclazocine, 8-CAC acts as an agonist at both the μ and κ opioid receptors, but has a much longer duration of action than cyclazocine, and does not have μ antagonist activity. Unexpectedly it was discovered that the phenolic hydroxyl group of cyclazocine could be replaced by a carboxamido group with only slight loss of potency at opioid receptors, and this discovery has subsequently been used to develop a large number of novel opioid derivatives where the phenolic hydroxy group has been replaced by either carboxamide or a variety of larger groups. Due to their strong κ-opioid agonist activity, these drugs are not suited for use as analgesics in humans, but have instead been researched as potential drugs for the treatment of cocaine addiction.[2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10]

See also

References

  1. ^ US Patent 6784187 8-carboxamido-2,6-methano-3-benzazocines
  2. ^ Wentland, M. P.; Lou, R.; Ye, Y.; Cohen, D. J.; Richardson, G. P.; Bidlack, J. M. (March 2001). "8-Carboxamidocyclazocine analogues: Redefining the structure-activity relationships of 2,6-methano-3-benzazocines". Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 11 (5): 623–626.  
  3. ^ Bidlack, J. M.; Cohen, D. J.; McLaughlin, J. P.; Lou, R.; Ye, Y.; Wentland, M. P. (July 2002). "8-Carboxamidocyclazocine: A Long-Acting, Novel Benzomorphan" (pdf). The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 302 (1): 374–380.  
  4. ^ Stevenson, G. W.; Wentland, M. P.; Bidlack, J. M.; Mello, N. K.; Negus, S. S. (December 2004). "Effects of the Mixed-Action κ/μ Opioid Agonist 8-Carboxamidocyclazocine on Cocaine- and Food-Maintained Responding in Rhesus Monkeys". European Journal of Pharmacology 506 (2): 133–141.  
  5. ^ Wentland, M. P.; VanAlstine, M.; Kucejko, R.; Lou, R.; Cohen, D. J.; Parkhill, A. L.; Bidlack, J. M. (September 2006). "Redefining the structure-activity relationships of 2,6-methano-3-benzazocines. 4. Opioid receptor binding properties of 8-[N-((4'-phenyl)-phenethyl)carboxamido] analogues of cyclazocine and ethylketocyclazocine". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 49 (18): 5635–5639.  
  6. ^ VanAlstine, M. A.; Wentland, M. P.; Cohen, D. J.; Bidlack, J. M. (December 2007). "Redefining the structure-activity relationships of 2,6-methano-3-benzazocines. 5. Opioid receptor binding properties of N-((4'-phenyl)-phenethyl) analogues of 8-CAC". Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 17 (23): 6516–6520.  
  7. ^ Wentland, M. P.; Sun, X.; Cohen, D. J.; Bidlack, J. M. (May 2008). "Redefining the structure-activity relationships of 2,6-methano-3-benzazocines. Part 6: Opioid receptor binding properties of cyclic variants of 8-carboxamidocyclazocine". Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry 16 (10): 5653–5664.  
  8. ^ Wentland, M. P.; Lu, Q.; Ganorkar, R.; Zhang, S. Z.; Jo, S.; Cohen, D. J.; Bidlack, J. M. (January 2009). "Redefining the structure-activity relationships of 2,6-methano-3-benzazocines. Part 7: Syntheses and opioid receptor properties of cyclic variants of cyclazocine". Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 19 (2): 365–368.  
  9. ^ Wentland, M. P.; Lou, R.; Lu, Q.; Bu, Y.; Denhardt, C.; Jin, J.; Ganorkar, R.; VanAlstine, M. A.; Guo, C.; Cohen, D. J.; Bidlack, J. M. (April 2009). "Syntheses of novel high affinity ligands for opioid receptors". Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 19 (8): 2289–2294.  
  10. ^ Prisinzano, T. E.; Tidgewell, K.; Harding, W. W. (2005). "k Opioids as Potential Treatments for Stimulant Dependence" (pdf). The AAPS Journal 7 (3): E592–E599.  


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