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Aaron Ciechanover

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Title: Aaron Ciechanover  
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Subject: Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Avram Hershko, Proteasome, 2004 in Israel, History of the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology
Collection: 1947 Births, Foreign Members of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Foreign Members of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Alumni, Israel Prize in Biology Recipients, Israeli Jews, Israeli Nobel Laureates, Israeli People of Polish Descent, Israeli People of Polish-Jewish Descent, Israeli Physicians, Jews in Mandatory Palestine, Living People, Members of the European Molecular Biology Organization, Members of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Members of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Nobel Laureates in Chemistry, People from Haifa, Recipients of the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology Faculty
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Aaron Ciechanover

Aaron Ciechanover
Born (1947-10-01) October 1, 1947
Haifa, British Mandate of Palestine (now Israel)
Nationality Israeli
Fields Biology
Known for Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation
Notable awards Nobel Prize in Chemistry (2004)
Spouse Menucha Ciechanover

Aaron Ciechanover ( pronunction   ; אהרן צ'חנובר; born October 1, 1947) is an Israeli biologist, who won the Nobel prize in Chemistry for characterizing the method that cells use to degrade and recycle proteins using ubiquitin.

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Publications 2
  • Industry involvement 3
  • Awards 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Biography

Ciechanover was born in Haifa, a year before the establishment of Israel. He is the son of Bluma (Lubashevsky), a teacher of English, and Yitzhak Ciechanover, an office worker.[1] His family were Jewish immigrants from Poland before World War II.

He earned a master's degree in science in 1971 and graduated from Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem in 1974. He received his doctorate in biochemistry in 1981 from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa before conducting postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Harvey Lodish at the Whitehead Institute at MIT from 1981-1984. He is currently a Technion Distinguished Research Professor in the Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute at the Technion.

Ciechanover is a member of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and is a foreign associate of the United States National Academy of Sciences.

As one of Israel's first Nobel Laureates in Science, he is honored in playing a central role in the history of Israel and in the history of the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology.

Publications

  • Ciechanover, A., Hod, Y. and Hershko, A. (1978). A Heat-stable Polypeptide Component of an ATP-dependent Proteolytic System from Reticulocytes. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 81, 1100–1105.
  • Ciechanover, A., Heller, H., Elias, S., Haas, A.L. and Hershko, A. (1980). ATP-dependent Conjugation of Reticulocyte Proteins with the Polypeptide Required for Protein Degradation. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 1365–1368.
  • Hershko, A. and Ciechanover, A. (1982). Mechanisms of intracellular protein breakdown. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 51, 335–364.

Industry involvement

Ciechanover has served on the Scientific Advisory Boards of the following companies: Rosetta Genomics (Chairman), BioLineRx, Ltd, StemRad, Ltd, Allosterix Ltd, Proteologics, Inc, MultiGene Vascular Systems, Ltd, Protalix BioTherapeutics and BioTheryX, Inc.

Ciechanover is a member of the Advisory Board of Patient Innovation, a nonprofit, international, multilingual, free venue for patients and caregivers of any disease to share their innovations.

Awards

See also

References

  1. ^ http://encyclopedia.jrank.org/articles/pages/5635/Ciechanover-Aaron-1947.html
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ Nobel citation
  5. ^ Aaron Ciechanover and Avram Hershko 2004 Nobel in Chemistry – A web article
  6. ^

External links

  • Nobel Prize Lecture
  • Website at the Technion
  • [1]
  • A video interview with Aaron Ciechanover
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