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Acetamiprid

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Title: Acetamiprid  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Neonicotinoid, Insecticides, Attractive toxic sugar baits, Benzoylurea, Empenthrin
Collection: Amidines, Chloropyridines, Nitriles, Organochlorides, Pyridines
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Acetamiprid

Acetamiprid
Identifiers
CAS number  YesY
ChemSpider  YesY
KEGG  YesY
MeSH
ChEBI  YesY
ChEMBL  YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C10H11ClN4
Appearance white powder
Density 1.17 g/cm3
Melting point 98.9 °C (210.0 °F; 372.0 K)
Hazards
Flash point 166.9 °C (332.4 °F; 440.0 K)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 YesY   YesY/N?)

Acetamiprid is an organic compound with the chemical formula C10H11ClN4. It is an odorless neonicotinoid insecticide produced under the trade names Assail, and Chipco by Aventis CropSciences. It is systemic and intended to control sucking insects on crops such as leafy vegetables, citrus fruits, pome fruits, grapes, cotton, cole crops, and ornamental plants. It is also a key pesticide in commercial cherry farming due to its effectiveness against the larvae of the cherry fruit fly.

Safety

Acetamiprid is classified as unlikely to be a human carcinogen. Acetamiprid has a low acute and chronic toxicity in mammals with no evidence of carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity or mutagenicity. It is classified as toxicity category rating II in acute oral studies with rats, toxicity category III in acute dermal and inhalation studies with rats, and toxicity category IV in primary eye and skin irritation studies with rabbits. It is mobile in soil, but degrades rapidly via aerobic soil metabolism, with studies showing its half life between <1 and 8.2 days. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does not consider it to be environmentally persistent. The EPA considers it "only moderately toxic" to bees; however, some media sources and the recent documentary Vanishing of the Bees have blamed neonicotinoids like acetamiprid for colony collapse disorder.

External links

  • PEA Fact sheet
  • Pesticide Properties Database record for Acetamiprid
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