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Agriculture in Nigeria

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Title: Agriculture in Nigeria  
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Subject: Nigeria, Economy of Nigeria, Agriculture in Nigeria, Yam production in Nigeria, Unity Bank (Nigeria)
Collection: Agriculture in Nigeria
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Agriculture in Nigeria

A farmers market in Nigeria.

Agriculture in Nigeria is a major branch of the economy in Nigeria, providing employment for 70% of the population. The sector is being transformed by commercialization at the small, medium and large-scale enterprise levels.[1]

Contents

  • Dynamics 1
  • Agricultural products 2
    • Food crops 2.1
    • Cocoa 2.2
    • Rubber 2.3
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Dynamics

In 1990, 82 million hectares out of Nigeria's total land area of about 91 million hectares were found to be arable. 42 percent of the cultivable area was farmed. Much of this land was farmed under the bush fallow system, whereby land is left idle for a period of time to allow natural regeneration of soil fertility. 18 million hectares were classified as permanent pasture, but had the potential to support crops. Most of the 20 million hectares covered by forests and woodlands are believed to have agricultural potential.[2]

Agricultural holdings are small and scattered, and farming is carried out with simple tools. Large-scale agriculture is not common. Agriculture contributed 32% to GDP in 2001.[3]

Agricultural products

A map of Nigeria's main agricultural products.

Major crops include soybeans and yams.

The country's agricultural products fall into two main groups: food crops produced for home consumption, and exports. Prior to the Nigerian civil war, the country was self-sufficient in food, but increased steeply after 1973. Bread made from American wheat replaced domestic crops as the cheapest staple food.[3]

Food crops

The most important food crops are

  • Agriculture & Animals Motherland Nigeria
  • AgroNigeria: Nigeria's Agricultural Mouthpiece
  • West African Agricultural Market Observer/Observatoire du Marché Agricole (RESIMAO)
  • Major Farming Problems in Nigeria-Crop Farmers and Livestock Rearers

External links

  1. ^ Olomola Ade S. (2007) “Strategies for Managing the Opportunities and Challenges of the Current Agricultural Commodity Booms in SSA” in Seminar Papers on Managing Commodity Booms in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Publication of the AERC Senior Policy Seminar IX. African Economic Research Consortium (AERC), Nairobi, Kenya
  2. ^ Countries studies, Nigeria
  3. ^ a b c d e Nigeria agriculture

References

See also

Rubber is the second-largest non-oil foreign exchange earner.[3]

Rubber

Cocoa is the leading non-oil foreign exchange earner but the dominance of smallholders and lack of farm labor due to urbanization hold back production. In 1999, Nigeria produced 145,000 tons of cocoa beans, but has the potential for over 300,000 per year.[3]

Cocoa

[3]

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