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Alderwasley

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Alderwasley

Alderwasley

Alderwasley parish highlighted within Derbyshire
OS grid reference
Shire county Derbyshire
Region East Midlands
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Police Derbyshire
Fire Derbyshire
Ambulance East Midlands
EU Parliament East Midlands
List of places
UK
England
Derbyshire

Alderwasley ( )[1] is a village and civil parish in the Amber Valley district of Derbyshire, England. Alderwasley Hall is the home to one of the sites of Alderwasley Hall School which is a special school for children and young people with Aspergers and/or Speech and Language Difficulties. It is about six miles north of Belper.

The village's name derives from the Old English for clearing near alluvial land growing with alders.[2] In the Middle Ages, it was a manor within Duffield Frith and contained the Royal Park of Shining Cliff Woods and a later park was formed to the south called Bradley Laund. In 1284 the Shining Cliff was given to William Foun by Edmund Crouchback, Earl of Lancaster. Foun was given the job of maintaining the boundaries between the Pendleton and Peatpits Brooks.

Alderwasley Hall – home of the Hurt family – now a school

This passed to Thomas Lowe by marriage in 1471. His son Anthony Lowe, as gentleman of the bedchamber for Henry VIII, was made a hereditary forester of Duffield Frith in 1523, and awarded the Manor of Alderwasley, with Ashleyhay, in 1528. In 1670 the whole estate passed, again by marriage, to Nicholas Hurt of Casterne in Staffordshire, a direct ancestor or William Foun, and in 1715 he formed a new park. In 1905 this contained a herd of eighty fallow deer and what was considered to be the finest timber, especially oak, to be found. However the estate was sold and broken up in the 1920s.[3]

References

  1. ^ G.M. Miller, BBC Pronouncing Dictionary of British Names (Oxford UP, 1971), p. 3.
  2. ^
  3. ^ Turbutt, G., (1999) A History of Derbyshire. Volume 2: Medieval Derbyshire, Cardiff: Merton Priory Press

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