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Alex Kuznetsov


Alex Kuznetsov
Country  United States
Residence Tampa, Florida, United States
Born (1987-02-05) February 5, 1987
Kiev, USSR (now Ukraine)
Height 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Turned pro 2004
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money $773,374
Singles
Career record 8–23
Career titles 0
4 Challengers
Highest ranking No. 120 (September 30, 2013)
Current ranking No. 148 (June 23, 2014)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 2R (2007)
French Open 1R (2013)
Wimbledon 1R (2013, 2014)
US Open 1R (2006, 2007)
Doubles
Career record 9–13
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 78 (September 24, 2007)
Current ranking No. 481 (June 23, 2014)
Last updated on: June 23, 2014.

Alex Kuznetsov (born February 5, 1987) is an American professional tennis player.

Contents

  • Personal life 1
  • Tennis career 2
    • Juniors 2.1
    • 2006 2.2
    • 2007 2.3
    • Singles performance timeline 2.4
    • Doubles performance timeline 2.5
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Personal life

Though born in Ukraine, his family moved to the United States when he was 3 years old, settling just outside of Philadelphia. He resides in Tampa, Florida where he trains at Saddlebrook Resort Club. He trains with John Isner and Tim Smyczek.

Kuznetsov is not related to Russian tennis player Svetlana Kuznetsova or Andrey Kuznetsov[1]

Tennis career

Kuznetsov is part of a group of players including Sam Querrey, John Isner, Ryan Harrison, Denis Kudla, are Ryan Sweeting that are hoped by some to provide a boost to American tennis, with Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi long-since retired and "aging" American tennis player Mardy Fish nearing the end of his career.

Juniors

Excelling as a junior, Kuznetsov was coached by Robert Fisher at Germantown Cricket Club during youth. Considered by Brad Gilbert at one time the "next big thing in American Tennis" after Andy Roddick. Passing on then top American Junior, Jarrett Chirico who now coaches at Germantown Cricket Club. Alex was given this title because at the time the USTA thought big body with hard serve would turn out the best players, like Roddick.

As a junior Kuznetsov compiled a singles win/loss record of 67-27 (50-21 in doubles), reaching a combined junior world ranking of No. 4 in July 2004.

Junior Slam results – Singles:

Australian Open: -
French Open: F (2004)
Wimbledon: 2R (2004)
US Open: 3R (2005)

Nike offered Alex a 1 million dollar sponsorship contract as soon as he turned pro which he accepted.

He was involved in a serious car accident soon after.

2006

In July 2006 Alex played in the Comerica Challenger in Aptos, defeating Go Soeda for the 2006 singles title. At the 2006 US Open, he lost to 14th seed Tommy Haas.

2006 also saw Kuznetsov appear in the video game Top Spin 2 as an up-and-coming star.

2007

Kuznetsov reached the second round of the 2007 Australian Open, defeating Australian Peter Luczak before losing to fellow American James Blake, 6–4, 6–1, 6–2. Kuznetsov gave Blake an early scare by breaking Blake's first two service games.

In April 2007, he reached his career-high singles ranking of World No. 158.

In the 2007 US Open he played doubles with American Jesse Levine. They won their first round match over Dominik Hrbatý of Slovakia and Harel Levy of Israel, 6–1, 6–4, and their second round match, upsetting 7th-seeded Frenchmen Arnaud Clément and Michaël Llodra 7–6(5), 6–4, before losing in the third round to 9th-seeded Czechs Lukáš Dlouhý and Pavel Vízner, 6–4, 7–5.

The Tennis Australia. The other players selected based on age (22 and under) and ranking (top 200) to compete in Boca Raton, Florida, were Levine and Wayne Odesnik. They played in a round-robin format.[2] Levine won the wild card.[3]

Singles performance timeline

Key
W  F  SF QF R# RR LQ (Q#) A P Z# PO SF-B F-S G NMS NH

Won tournament; or reached Final; Semifinal; Quarter-final; Round 4, 3, 2, 1; competed at a Round Robin stage; lost in Qualification Round; absent from tournament event; played in a Davis Cup Zonal Group (with its number indication) or Play-off; won a bronze, silver (F or S) or gold medal at the Olympics; a downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament (Not a Masters Series); or a tournament that was Not Held in a given year.

To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated either at the conclusion of a tournament, or when the player's participation in the tournament has ended.

Current till US Open.
Tournament 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 W–L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A 2R Q2 A Q1 Q3 1R Q1 Q3 1-2
French Open A Q2 Q1 A A Q1 Q2 1R Q1 0–1
Wimbledon A Q2 Q1 A Q2 Q2 Q1 1R 1R 0–2
US Open 1R 1R Q3 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q3 2-3
Win–Loss 0–1 1–2 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 2–3 0–1 3–8
Career statistics
Titles–Finals 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0-0 0–0
Year End Ranking 223 180 344 198 250 169 224 142

Doubles performance timeline

Key
W  F  SF QF R# RR LQ (Q#) A P Z# PO SF-B F-S G NMS NH

Won tournament; or reached Final; Semifinal; Quarter-final; Round 4, 3, 2, 1; competed at a Round Robin stage; lost in Qualification Round; absent from tournament event; played in a Davis Cup Zonal Group (with its number indication) or Play-off; won a bronze, silver (F or S) or gold medal at the Olympics; a downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament (Not a Masters Series); or a tournament that was Not Held in a given year.

To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated either at the conclusion of a tournament, or when the player's participation in the tournament has ended.

Current till US Open.
Tournament 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2013 W–L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open 0-0
French Open 0–0
Wimbledon 1R 0–1
US Open 1R 2R 1R 3R 1R 1R 1R 3-7
Win–Loss 0–1 1–1 0–1 2–2 0–1 0–1 0–1 3–8
Career statistics
Titles–Finals 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0

References

  1. ^ http://challengertennis.wordpress.com/2011/04/06/know-your-kuznetsovs-%E2%80%93-a-field-guide/
  2. ^ "Isner on outside looking in at Australian Open ... for now" ESPN, 12/11/07, accessed 12/13/07
  3. ^ "Boca's Levine earns Aussie wild card with win over Odesnik", South Florida Sun-Sentinel, 12/20/07, accessed 12/20/07]

External links

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