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Allison Legacy Series

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Allison Legacy Series

The Allison Legacy Series is a stock car racing series in the United States. It is based on 3/4 size scaled down NASCAR Sprint Cup Series chassis utilizing a Mazda B-2200 truck engine. The lower-tier series has been used as a stepping stone into higher divisions. The cars were designed in 1996 by NASCAR driver Donnie Allison's sons Donald, Kenny, and Ronald Allison.

History

An Allison Legacy Series car at Columbus 151 Speedway in 2012

The series was conceived in 1996 by Donald, Kenny, and Ronald Allison, the sons of former NASCAR driver Donnie Allison.[1] The vehicles were designed to be 3/4 size stock cars.[1] Kenny Allison said that the cars were designed to be decently affordable and have decent maintenance costs yet be a class that fans can relate to.[1] The cars began to compete regularly in 1998 with the formation of a national series.[1] The national touring series is run out of the Allison Brothers shop at Salisbury, North Carolina.[1] By 2004, eight regional touring series had formed in the United States, including the Maine Legacy Series which had Canadian dates in Quebec and Nova Scotia.[1]

The cars are typically raced on road courses and 0.5 miles (0.80 km) or less short tracks.[2] Feature events are typically 50 laps or less.[2]

Vehicle

The series uses a tubular chassis with a fiberglass body.[2] Body styles include a Ford Thunderbird and Chevrolet Monte Carlo.[2] The vehicle is 60 inches (150 cm) wide, 12.5 feet (3.8 m) long, 42 inches (110 cm) high, with a 80 inches (200 cm) wheelbase.[2] The chassis is powered by a Mazda B2200 2.2 liter engine.The chassis must weigh 1,425 pounds (646 kg) (without the driver) and it utilizes 7 inches (18 cm) wide Goodyear tires.[2] As of August 2004, the vehicles were estimated to cost around $16,800 by Stock Car Racing Magazine.[1]

Racing enhancements including an aluminum radiator, adjustable front suspension, aluminum front hubs, a quick change rear end, steel racing wheels, and coil over shocks and springs. An aluminum racing seat, 5-point harness, and window nets are required for safety.[2]

Drivers

Drivers in the series are part-time, including children who are old enough to have jobs.[1] The series is often used as a development series by Late Model drivers.[3] Drivers who have used the Allison Legacy Series on their way to NASCAR include: Trevor Bayne, Kelly Bires, Erik Darnell, Joey Logano, David Ragan, Regan Smith, and Brian Vickers.[3] Chad McCumbee won the 2001 national championship and rookie of the year; he repeated as champion in the following season.[4] Timmy Hill won the 2009 U.S. national championship after winning ten races.[5]

National championship drivers

References

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External links

  • Official website
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