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Anticaking agent

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Title: Anticaking agent  
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Subject: Caking, Celery salt, Soil2O, Packaging gas, Onion powder
Collection: Food Additives
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Anticaking agent

An anticaking agent is an additive placed in powdered or granulated materials, such as table salt, to prevent the formation of lumps (caking) and for easing packaging, transport, and consumption.

An anticaking agent in salt is denoted in the ingredients, for example, as "anti-caking agent (554)", which is sodium aluminosilicate, a man-made product. This product is present in many commercial table salts as well as dried milk, egg mixes, sugar products, and flours. In Europe, sodium ferrocyanide (535) and potassium ferrocyanide (536) are more common anticaking agents in table salt. "Natural" anticaking agents used in more expensive table salt include calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate.

Some anticaking agents are absorbing excess moisture or by coating particles and making them water-repellent. Calcium silicate (CaSiO3), a commonly used anti-caking agent, added to e.g. table salt, absorbs both water and oil.

Anticaking agents are also used in non-food items such as road salt,[1] fertilisers,[2] cosmetics,[3] synthetic detergents,[4] and in manufacturing applications.

List of anticaking agents

The following anticaking agents are listed in order by their number in the Codex Alimentarius.

References

  1. ^ "Anticaking Admixtures to Road Salt". Transportation.org. Retrieved 2010-06-17. 
  2. ^ "Fertilizer compositions containing alkylene oxide adduct anticaking agents". Google.com. Retrieved 2010-06-17. 
  3. ^ "Talc Information". Cosmeticsinfo.org. Retrieved 2010-06-17. 
  4. ^ "Synthetic Detergents: Introduction to Detergent Chemistry". Chemistry.co.nz. 2006-12-15. Archived from the original on 26 May 2010. Retrieved 2010-06-17. 
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