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Antimony tetroxide

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Title: Antimony tetroxide  
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Subject: Antimony, Antimony trioxide, Oxides, Carbon trioxide, Suboxide
Collection: Antimony Compounds, Mixed Valence Compounds, Oxides
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Antimony tetroxide

Antimony tetroxide

     An      O
Names
IUPAC name
antimony(III,V) oxide
Identifiers
 N
PubChem
Properties
SbO2; Sb2O4
Molar mass 153.7588; 307.5176 g/mol
Appearance white solid
Density 6.64 g/cm3 (orthorhombic form) [1]
Melting point > 930 °C (1,710 °F; 1,200 K) (decomposes)
Boiling point decomposes
insoluble
2.0
Structure
orthorhombic
Hazards
NFPA 704
1
2
0
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
TWA 0.5 mg/m3 (as Sb)[2]
REL (Recommended)
TWA 0.5 mg/m3 (as Sb)[2]
Related compounds
Related compounds
Antimony trioxide
Antimony pentoxide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
 N  (: YesY/N?)

Antimony tetroxide is an

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^ a b
  3. ^
  4. ^ Holleman, A. F.; Wiberg, E. "Inorganic Chemistry" Academic Press: San Diego, 2001. ISBN 0-12-352651-5.

References

The material is mixed valence, containing both Sb(V) and Sb(III) centers. Two polymorphs are known, one orthorhombic (shown in the infobox) and one monoclinic.[1] Both forms feature octahedral Sb(V) centers arranged in sheets with distorted Sb(III) centers bound to four oxides.

Sb2O5 → Sb2O4 + 0.5 O2 ΔH = −64 kJ/mol

At 800 °C, antimony(V) oxide loses oxygen to give the same material:

Sb2O3 + 0.5 O2 → Sb2O4 ΔH = −187 kJ/mol

The material forms when Sb2O3 is heated in air:[4]

Formation and structure

, is called antimony tetroxide to signify the presence of two kinds of Sb centers. 2 is white but reversibly yellows upon heating. The material, with empirical formula SbO[3]

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