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Applied science

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Title: Applied science  
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Applied science

Applied science is a discipline of science that applies existing scientific knowledge to develop more practical applications, like technology or inventions.

Within natural science, disciplines that are basic science, also called pure science, develop information to predict and perhaps explain—thus somehow understand—phenomena in the natural world. Engineering which includes Applied science develops technology, although there might be feedback between basic science and applied science: research and development (R&D). Engineering sciences include for example: thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, statics, dynamics, mechanics of materials, kinematics, electromagnetism, materials science, earth sciences, engineering physics, and many others.

Medical sciences, for instance medical microbiology and its clinical virology, are applied sciences that apply biology toward medical knowledge and inventions, but not necessarily medical technology, whose development is more specifically biomedicine or biomedical engineering. Applied science can also apply formal science, such as statistics and probability theory, as in epidemiology. Genetic epidemiology is an applied science applying both biological and statistical methods.

Contents

  • Fields of applied sciences 1
  • In education 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Fields of applied sciences

In education

In the United Kingdom's educational system, Applied Science refers to a suite of "vocational" science qualifications that run alongside "traditional" GCSE or A-Level Sciences .[1] Level 2 Courses (GCSE Equivalent): BTEC Applied Science, OCR Nationals, GCSE Applied Science, GCSE Additional Applied Science. Level 3 Courses (A Level Equivalent): GCE Applied Science, BTEC Applied Science, OCR Nationals. Applied Science courses generally contain more coursework (also known as portfolio or internally assessed work) compared to their traditional counterparts. These are an evolution of the GNVQ qualifications that were offered up to 2005 These courses regularly come under scrutiny and are due for review following the Wolf Report 2011 [2] however their merits are argued elsewhere [3]

In the United States, The College of William & Mary offers an undergraduate minor as well as Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in "applied science." Courses and research cover varied fields including neuroscience, optics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive testing, and nuclear magnetic resonance.[4] In New York City, the Bloomberg administration awarded the consortium of Cornell-Technion $100 million in City capital to construct the universities' proposed Applied Sciences campus on Roosevelt Island.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ Applied Science - an invisible revolution? | Nuffield Foundation
  2. ^ Review of Vocational Education - The Wolf Report : The Department for Education
  3. ^ http://www.education.leeds.ac.uk/research/files/78.pdf
  4. ^ William & Mary - Applied Science
  5. ^ Applied Sciences NYC | NYCEDC
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