Archbishop of Tours

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Tours (Lat:Archidioecesis Turonensis) is an Archdiocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic church in France. The archdiocese encompasses the historical Gallo-Roman province of Civitas Turonum and the French province of Touraine. Since 1790 it has corresponded with the département of Indre et Loire. Erected in the 3rd century, the diocese was elevated in the 5th century.

The ecclesiastical province of Tours corresponded with the late Roman province of Tertia Lugdunensis. During Breton independence the see of Dol briefly exercised metropolitical functions (mainly tenth century). In 1859 the Breton dioceses except that of Nantes were constituted into a province of Rennes. Tours kept its historic suffragans of Le Mans, Angers (a hostile bishop of Angers appears to have been present at the episcopal consecration of St. Martin) together with Nantes and a newly constituted diocese of Laval. In 2002 Tours lost all connection with its historic province, all its previous suffragans depending henceforth on an expanded province of Rennes (corresponding to the Brittany and Pays de la Loire administrative regions). Tours since 2002 has become the ecclesiastical metropolis of the Centre administrative region, i.e. including the dioceses of Bourges, which has lost its metropolitical function to Clermont Ferrand, Orleans, Chartres and Blois, which depended historically on Sens (Lugdunensis Quarta) and more recently on Paris (and briefly Bourges).

The current bishop is Bernard-Nicolas Jean-Marie Aubertin, who was appointed in 2005.

Pilgrimages

The main pilgrimage sites in the diocese besides the grottos of Marmoutier, are: Notre-Dame-la-Riche, a sanctuary erected on the site of a church dating from the third century, and where the founder St. Gatianus is venerated; Notre-Dame-de-Loches; St. Christopher and St. Giles at St-Christophe, a pilgrimage dating from the ninth century; the pilgrimage to the Oratory of the Holy Face in Tours, managed by Priests of the Holy Face canonically erected on 8 December 1876.[1]

Ordinaries

  1. St. Gatianus ca 249-301
  2. St. Litorius 338-370
  3. St. Martin 371-397
  4. St. Bricius 397-443
  5. St. Eustochius 443-460
  6. St. Perpetuus 460-490
  7. St. Volusianus 491-498
  8. Verus 498-508
  9. St. Licinius 508-520
  10. Theodorus & Proculus (jointly) 520-521?
  11. Dinfius 521?
  12. Ommatius 521-525
  13. Leo 526
  14. Francilio 527-529
  15. Injuriosus 529-546
  16. Baudinus 546-552
  17. Gunthar 552-554
  18. St. Eufronius 555-573
  19. Gregory 573-594
  20. Pélage I 595-602
  21. Lupare 602-614
  22. Agiric 614-617
  23. Ginaldus 617-618
  24. Valatus 618-619
  25. Sigélaicus 619-622
  26. Léobald 622-625
  27. Modégisile 625-638
  28. Latinus 638-650
  29. Carégisile 650-652
  30. Rigobert 652-654
  31. Papolene 654-660
  32. Chrotbert 660-695
  33. Pélage II 695-700
  34. Evartius 700-709
  35. Ibbon 709-724
  36. Gontran II 724-732
  37. Didon 732-733
  38. Rimbert 733-752
  39. Aubert 752-754
  40. Ostald 754-760
  41. Gravien 760-765
  42. Eusebe 765-771
  43. Herling 771-792
  44. Joseph I 792-815

To 1000

  • Landran I 815-836
  • Ursmarus 836-846
  • Landran II 846-52
  • Amaury 852-856
  • Hérard 856-871
  • Actard 872-875
  • Adalardus 875-890
  • Héberne 890-916
  • Robert II of Tours 916-932
  • Théotolon 932-945
  • Joseph II 946-957
  • Frotaire 957-960
  • Hardouin 960-980
  • Archambault de Sully 981-1008

1000-1300

  • Hugues de Chateaudun 1008-1023
  • Arnoul 1023-1052
  • Barthelemy de Faye 1053-1068
  • Raoul I 1072-1085
  • Raoul II 1086-1117
  • Gilbert de Maillé 1118-1125
  • Hildebert de Lavardin 1125-1134
  • Hugues d'Etampes 1134-1146
  • Engebault de Preuilly[2] 1146-1157
  • Joscion 1157-1174
  • Barthelemy de Vendôme 1174-1206
  • Géoffroy de la Lande 1207-1208
  • Jean de la Faye 1208-1228
  • François Cassard 1228-1229
  • Juhel de Manthefelon 1229-1244
  • Géoffroy Marcel 1245-1250
  • Pierre de Lamballe 1251-1256
  • Philippe 1256-1257
  • Vincent de Pirmil 1257-1270
  • Jean de Montsoreau 1271-1284
  • Olivier de Craon 1284-1285
  • Bouchard Dain 1285-1290
  • Philippe de Candé 1290-1291
  • Renaud de Montbazon 1291-1313

1300-1500

  • Géoffroy de la Haye 1314-1323
  • Etienne de Bourgueil 1324-1334
  • Pierre Frétaud 1336-1357
  • Philippe Blanche 1357-1363
  • Simon de Renoul 1363-1379
  • Seguin d'Auton 1379-
  • Aléaume Boistel 1380-1383
  • Guy de Roye 1383-1384
  • Seguin d'Auton 1384-1394
  • Ameil du Breuil 1393-1414
  • Jacques Gélu 1414-1426
  • Philippe de Coëtquis 1427-1441
  • Jean Bernard 1441-1466
  • Bastet de Crussol 1466-1468
  • Hélie de Bourdeilles 1468-1484
  • Robert de Lenoncourt 1484-1509

1500-1700

  • Dominique Caretto 1509-1513
  • Christophe de Brillac 1514-1519
  • Martin of Beaune 1519-1527
  • Antoine of the Bar 1528-1547
  • Georges d'Armagnac 1547-1551
  • Etienne Poncher 1551-1552
  • Alessandro Farnese 1553-1554
  • Simon de Maillé 1554-1597
  • François de la Guesle 1597-1614
  • Sebastien d'Ori Galagai 1617-
  • Bertrand d'Eschaud 1617-1641
  • Victor Bouthillier 1641-1670
  • Charles de Rosmadec 1671-1672
  • Michel Amelot de Gournay 1673-1687
  • Claude de Saint George 1687-
  • Mathieu Isoré d'Hervault 1693-1716

1700-1900

From 1900

  • Albert Negre 1913-1931
  • Ludovico Gaillard 1931-1956
  • Louis Ferrand 1956-1980
  • Jean Marcel Honoré 1981-1997
  • Michel Moutel 1997-1998
  • André Vingt-Trois 1999-2005
  • Bernard-Nicolas Jean-Marie Aubertin 2005-

Notes

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