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Armistice of Villa Giusti

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Title: Armistice of Villa Giusti  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Military history of Italy during World War I, Italian Front (World War I), Battle of Vittorio Veneto, Gino Polli, Infobox former subdivision/testcases
Collection: 1918 in Austria, 1918 in Austria-Hungary, 1918 in Italy, 1918 in Military History, Armistices, Austria-Hungary in World War I, Austria–italy Relations, Italy in World War I, Military History of Italy During World War I, Peace Treaties of Austria, Peace Treaties of Italy, Treaties Concluded in 1918, Treaties Entered Into Force in 1918, Treaties of Austria-Hungary, Treaties of the Kingdom of Italy (1861–1946), World War I Treaties
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Armistice of Villa Giusti

The Armistice of Villa Giusti ended warfare between Italy and Austria-Hungary on the Italian Front during World War I. The armistice was signed on 3 November 1918 in the Villa Giusti, outside of Padua in the Veneto, northern Italy, and was to take effect 24 hours later.

Background

By the end of October 1918, while its definitive defeat was being perpetrated at the Battle of Vittorio Veneto, the Austro-Hungarian Army found itself in such a state that its commanders were forced to seek a ceasefire at any cost.

During the Battle of Vittorio Veneto, the troops of Austria-Hungary were defeated, ceasing to exist as a combat force and starting a chaotic withdrawal. From 28 October onwards, Austria-Hungary sought to negotiate a truce but hesitated to sign the text of armistice. The Italians, in the meantime, advanced reaching Trento, Udine, and landing in Trieste. After the threat to break off the negotiations, on 3 November the Austro-Hungarians accepted the peace terms. The cease-fire would be started at 3.00 pm on 4 November, but due to a unilateral order of the Austro-Hungarian high command, the empire's forces stopped fighting on 3 November. After the war, the Kingdom of Italy annexed the

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