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Arts Council of Great Britain

The Arts Council of Great Britain was a non-departmental public body dedicated to the promotion of the fine arts in Great Britain. The Arts Council of Great Britain was divided in 1994 to form the Arts Council of England (now Arts Council England), the Scottish Arts Council, and the Arts Council of Wales. At the same time the National Lottery was established and these three arts councils, plus the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, became distribution bodies.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Chairmen of the Arts Council 2
  • Further reading 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

History

Dancers from the Ballet Rambert, under the auspices of CEMA perform Peter and The Wolf at an aircraft factory in the Midlands during World War II

In 1940, during the Second World War, a Council for the Encouragement of Music and the Arts (CEMA), was appointed to help promote and maintain British culture. Chaired by Lord De La Warr, President of the Board of Education, the Council was government-funded and after the war was renamed the Arts Council of Great Britain.

A Royal Charter was granted on 9 August 1946,[1] followed by another in 1967. The latter provided for functions in Scotland and Wales to be conducted by two almost autonomous committees known as the Scottish and Welsh Arts Councils – the basis for today’s Scottish Arts Council and Arts Council of Wales.

The Council's first Chairman was Royal Opera House and was restricted to Central London. Keynes used his political influence to ensure that the Arts Council reported directly to the Treasury rather than an Arts Minister or the Education Department as had been the case with CEMA, establishing the principle of an 'arms length' relationship between UK Arts policy and the government of the day.

After Keynes' death Government funding was reduced but the Arts Council received wide recognition for its contribution to the Festival of Britain thanks to the new Chairman Kenneth Clark. Artworks commissioned by the Council for the Festival were retained to form the basis of the Arts Council Collection. The Arts Council commissioned 12 sculptors and 60 painters, who made large paintings, 114 by 152 centimetres (45 by 60 in) or more, to be displayed at the festival. Ultimately the works were to be given to new hospitals, libraries, schools, and health titi that emerged after the war. There were five cash prizes awarded: Robert Adams's Apocalyptic Figure, Elinor Bellingham-Smith's The Island, Lucian Freud's Interior near Paddington, William Gear's Autumn Landscape, and Robert MacBryde's Figure and Still Life.[2]

Under the Hayward Gallery on London's South Bank in 1968 as a home for its major exhibitions and the base for the Arts Council Collection. Since 1987, the gallery has been independently managed by the South Bank Centre. In 2003 sculpture in the Collection was moved to a base in Yorkshire.

During the 1970s and 1980s the Arts Council came under attack for being elitist and politically biased, in particular from the prominent William Rees-Mogg was a political appointment as Chairman and proposed slimming down the Council's responsibilities. This led to a series of clashes with prominent figures from the Arts such as Peter Hall who resigned from the Council in protest. In 1987 the restructure inspired by Rees-Mogg cut by half the number of organisations receiving Arts Council funding. During the same period the Arts Council began encouraging a greater level of corporate sponsorship for the arts.

The Arts Council of Great Britain was divided in 1994 to form the Arts Council of England, Scottish Arts Council and Arts Council of Wales. At the same time the National Lottery was established and the Arts Council of England became one of the distribution bodies.

Kit Wright was one of the winners.

Chairmen of the Arts Council

Chairman Served
The Lord Keynes 1946
Sir Ernest Pooley 1946–1953
Sir Kenneth Clark 1953–1960
The Lord Cottesloe 1960–1965
The Lord Goodman 1965–1972
Patrick Gibson 1972–1977
Sir Kenneth Robinson 1977–1982
Sir William Rees-Mogg 1982–1989
Peter Palumbo 1989–1993
The Earl of Gowrie 1993–1997

Further reading

  • Andrew Sinclair (1995) Arts and Cultures, The History of the 50 Years of the Arts Council of Great Britain, Sinclair-Stevenson ISBN 1-85619-342-X

References

  1. ^ Who's Who in Music and Musicians' International Directory. Burke's Peerage Edition, London 1962
  2. ^ Becky Conekin (28 June 2003). The Autobiography of a Nation: The 1951 Exhibition of Britain, Representing Britain in the Post-War World. Manchester University Press. p. 36.  

External links

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