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Askern

Askern

Askern Spa Pool
Askern is located in South Yorkshire
Askern
 Askern shown within South Yorkshire
Population 5,434 (2001)
OS grid reference
Civil parish Askern
Metropolitan borough Doncaster
Metropolitan county South Yorkshire
Region Yorkshire and the Humber
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town DONCASTER
Postcode district DN6
Dialling code 01302
Police South Yorkshire
Fire South Yorkshire
Ambulance Yorkshire
EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament Doncaster North
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire

Askern is a town and civil parish within the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster, in South Yorkshire, England. It is on the A19 road between Doncaster and Selby. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it became a spa town in the late 19th century, but this stopped once coal mines opened in the town. The last mine closed in the 1990s. It has a population of 5,434.[1]

Askern is also well known in South Yorkshire for its greyhound racing stadium.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Askern Spa 1.1
    • Coal mining 1.2
  • Railway 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

History

The history of Askern can be traced back to the reign of Edward III. The people of Norton complained to the Sheriff of Osgodcross that the people of Askern had failed to keep part of Askern Pool in a clean state. As a result the King's highway had been "overflowed and drowned so that neither horse nor foot passengers could use it".

Askern Spa

The area of the lake and the surrounding wetland area have dominated much of the town's history, starting from the settlements at Sutton Common and continuing through to the spa of the Victorian era.

Askern, a small farming village, became known locally for its waters in the 18th century when Dr Short, in his book Mineral Waters of Yorkshire, refers to the waters as having a most unpleasant odour and taste.

During the 19th century Askern started to gain a reputation as having water with healing properties. At this time the lords of the manor built the first bathhouse called Manor Baths. After this other baths were built, until in the late 19th century Askern had earned the title of Spa, and had 5 bathhouses; and the water could also be taken at the Spa Hydropathic Establishment.

Askern came to be the place to stay, and the railway was built to enable people from across the Pennines to come and partake of the healing waters. Many people were now coming to Askern by road and rail. Hotels were being built and guesthouses lined Station Road and Moss Road.

Coal mining

Then in the early years of the 20th century the quest for coal identified a good seam of coal near Askern. It was decided to access the coal from a mine built above the village, and with the mine came the people to build it. As the mine opened the new village was built to house the workers and their families. This new population was at odds with the well-to-do visitors. As the First World War started, the death knell was sounded for Askern Spa and the spa visitors declined to no more than a few regulars.

Once again Askern changed direction and became a thriving pit village, which welcomed people from all over the country to work and live in the area, giving the town a mixed background. The mine's coal was regarded as highest quality, and the opening of the Coalite works confirmed Askern as a place of high employment and a pleasant environment to live in. This however changed as the Coalite plant pushed more smoke and fumes into the atmosphere.

Railway

Askern is on the former Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway line between Doncaster and Wakefield Kirkgate, though Askern railway station closed in 1947 and little remains of it. The line is used mainly by goods services, including coal to Ferrybridge, Eggbrough and Drax power stations, as well as the infrequent Grand Central passenger services from Bradford Interchange to London King's Cross.

See also

References

  1. ^ Retrieved 2009-08-26Census 2001 : Parish Headcounts : DoncasterOffice for National Statistics :
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