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Bad Pyrmont

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Bad Pyrmont

Bad Pyrmont
Train station
Train station
Coat of arms of Bad Pyrmont
Coat of arms
Bad Pyrmont   is located in Germany
Bad Pyrmont
Bad Pyrmont
Coordinates:
Country Germany
State Lower Saxony
District Hameln-Pyrmont
Government
 • Mayor Klaus Blome (Ind.)
Area
 • Total 61.96 km2 (23.92 sq mi)
Population (2013-12-31)[1]
 • Total 18,909
 • Density 310/km2 (790/sq mi)
Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes 31812
Dialling codes 05281
Vehicle registration HM
Website www.stadt-badpyrmont.de
County (Principality) of Pyrmont
Grafschaft (Fürstentum) Pyrmont
State of the Holy Roman Empire,
State of the Confederation of the Rhine,
State of the German Confederation,
State of the North German Confederation,
State of the German Empire

1194–1918
Capital Pyrmont, Lügde
Government Principality
Historical era Middle Ages
 •  Partitioned from
    Schwalenberg

1194
 •  Comital line extinct;
    to Spiegelberg,
    Lippe, Gleichen


1494, 1557, 1583 1194
 •  To Waldeck 1625
 •  Regained independ. 1805–12
 •  Prussian admin. from 1868
 •  German Revolution 1918
 •  Joined Prussian
    province of Hanover

1921

Bad Pyrmont (German pronunciation: ) is a town in the district of Hamelin-Pyrmont, in Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany, with a population close to 19,000. It is located on the River Emmer, about 10 km west of the Weser. Bad Pyrmont is a popular spa resort that gained its reputation as a fashionable place for princely vacations in the 17th and 18th centuries. The town is also the center of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in Germany.

History

Formerly called Pyrmont, it was the seat of a small county during much of the Middle Ages. The county gained its independence from the County of Schwalenberg in 1194. Independence was maintained until the extinction of the comital line in 1494, when the county was inherited by the County of Spiegelberg. In 1557, the county was inherited by Lippe, then by the County of Gleichen in 1583.

In 1625, the county became part of the much larger County of Waldeck through inheritance. In 1668, the Reichskammergericht ruled against the Bishopric of Paderborn's claims that Pyrmont had been collateral in a loan, confirming the Count of Waldeck's rights over Pyrmont, who ceded the Amt of Lügde — previously the county's capital — to the bishopric in compensation. In January 1712, the Count of Waldeck and Pyrmont was elevated to hereditary prince by Emperor Charles VI, the count having combined the two titles the previous year.

For a brief period, from 1805 to 1812, Pyrmont was again a separate principality as a result of inheritance and partition after the death of the previous prince, but the two parts were united again in 1812. The principality of Waldeck-Pyrmont retained its status after the Congress of Vienna of 1815 and became a member of the German Confederation. In 1813, the inhabitants of Pyrmont began to protest at their lack of autonomy within Waldeck–Pyrmont and the separate constitutional nature of the two territories was confirmed the following year, until a formal union was established in 1849.

From 1868 onward, the principality was administered by Prussia, but retained its legislative sovereignty. Prussian administration served to reduce administrative costs for the small state and was based on a ten-year contract that was repeatedly renewed. In 1871 it became a constituent state of the new German Empire. At the end of World War I, during the German Revolution the prince abdicated and Waldeck–Pyrmont became a free state within the Weimar Republic. On 30 November 1921, following a local plebiscite, the town and district of Pyrmont were detached and incorporated into the Prussian Province of Hanover, with Waldeck following into the Prussian province of Hesse-Nassau in 1929.

Economy

As a spa town, Bad Pyrmont's economy is heavily geared towards tourism.

Bad Pyrmonter mineral water is bottled in Bad Pyrmont.

Attractions

Bad Pyrmont features a large Kurpark, with a sizeable outdoor [[palm

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