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Bangladesh Ansar

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Bangladesh Ansar

Bangladesh Ansar
বাংলাদেশ আনসার
Active 1948–present
Country

Pakistan (1948–1971)

Bangladesh (1971–present)
Allegiance Bangladesh
Type Internal Security, Law Enforcement
Size approx.5,840,000
Garrison/HQ Gazipur, Bangladesh
Nickname BA
Anniversaries 26 March
Engagements Bangladesh Liberation War
Decorations 1. Bir Sreshtho
2. Bir Uttom
3. Bir Bikrom
4. Bir Protik
Commanders
Director General Major General Md Nizam Uddin

The Bangladesh Ansar (also known as the Ansar Bahini) is a disciplined force for the preservation of internal security and law enforcement in Bangladesh. It is administered by the Ministry of Home Affairs of the Government of Bangladesh.[1][2] The name originates from the Arabic word of "Ansar", which denotes a "person who helps" and specifically refers to the companions of Muhammad, the prophet of Islam, during his exile from Mecca.[1][2]

History

The Ansar were formed out of the remnants of the Indian Home Guard who were from East Bengal, which had become a part of Pakistan after the partition of India in 1947.[2] The force was formed as the "East Pakistan Ansars" by the East Pakistan Ansars Act of 1948, and officially launched on February 12, 1948.[2] The first director of the Ansar was James Buchanan, a British official appointed by the government of then-Chief Minister of East Bengal Khawaja Nazimuddin.[2] The force was placed under the administration of the home ministry of the province of East Bengal (later known as East Pakistan). During the Indo-Pakistani War of 1965, the Ansar were deployed to the border areas along with the East Pakistan Rifles to support the Pakistani army.[2]

Post-independence

During the Bangladesh Liberation War of 1971, most of the Ansar joined the Awami League-led Mukti Bahini guerrillas to fight against the Pakistani army.[2] After the independence of Bangladesh, the force was reconstituted as the Bangladesh Ansar. The Ansar were given fresh importance by the government of President Ziaur Rahman, which designated the Ansar as the "people's defence force" and formed Ansar battalions.[1] A Gazette listing the name of freedom fighters, who fought against the Pakistani army during liberation war 1971, was published by the Government of the Peoples Republic of Bangladesh in 2003. Honorable Prime Minister of Government of the Peoples Republic Of Bangladesh awarded the respected family member of Martyrs of Ansar & VDP organization on 22 October 1997. With the remembrance respectfully about the proud contribution of the respected family members of Martyrs of this organization in the Great Liberation war, Ansar & VDP invited them in the Award giving ceremony of Ansar & VDP Academy, Shafipur, Gazipur, Dhaka.

Government of the Peoples Republic of Bangladesh

Bangladesh Gazette (additional) Saturday, September 6, 2003:

Government has published the list of Freedom fighters, by the recommendation of the national committee empowered by the Government of the peoples Republic of Bangladesh (Schedule of Rules of Business) or power given by 43 (6) of allocation of Business for publishing the correct list of the Brave Freedom Fighters and Martyr Freedom Fighters publishing in the Gazette through the finalization rightly: -

2. This list will be being published regularly through recommendation of the National Committee.

3. The list published in the Gazette will be considered as “final list” of the Freedom fighters.

4. If any name of non-Freedom fighter is published and proved as that through proper investigation, the name will be removed from the list and also the temporary certificate (if given already) also will be cancelled and lawful action will be taken against him.

5. Freedom fighters will receive their certificates on the basis of this list published in this Gazette with the signature of the Honorable Minister/State Minister of Ministry of Freedom affairs, which will be countersigned by the Chief Advisor of the Muktijoddha Sangsad, the Honorable Prime Minister of the Peoples Republic of Bangladesh.

List of Freedom Fighters of Ansars & Village Defence Force in Liberation war 1971

Serial No. Name

  • 1. M.Shariful Haq Late Lutful Haq Gosbag, Kobirhat, Noakhali
  • 2. Syed Habibul Bari, East Adalatpara, Tangail
  • 3. M.Tabibur Rahman, Abutara Villa, Gohail Road, Sutrapur, Bogra
  • 4. AKM Samsur Rahman, 98 Mokarbar Road, Narayanganj
  • 5. M Akram Hossain, Buchiar gram, Boalkhali, Faridpur
  • 6. Shamsul Haq, 688/C Khilgaon Chowdhury para, Dhaka
  • 7. M Hasem Ali Khan, Kasari Para, Keramatbag, Meherpur
  • 8. ATM Mozammel Haq , Singair, Manikganj
  • 9. M Shahabuddin Molla, Chandukathi, Kalisori, Potualkhai
  • 10. M Samsul Haq, Vandigram, Devidar, Comilla
  • 11. ASM Habibullah, Khilgaon, Dhaka
  • 12. M. Abul Hossain, Sastitola Para, Jessore
  • 13. K. A. Barkat, Sastitola Para, Jessore
  • 14. M Fazlul Karim, Khondokbaria Mirpur, Kustia
  • 15. M Khalek Sharif , 2/1 Block D Lalmatia, Dhaka
  • 16. Syed Anwar Hossain, Noor Manjil, Kutpara, Kustia
  • 17. M Ali Akbar, ChorJangalia, Prangonj, Bhola
  • 18. M Asaduzzaman, CharNurNagar, BasudevPur, ChapiNababganj
  • 19. M Khondakar Golam Kader, Chaklokman, Bogra
  • 20. Md Jashim Uddin Talukder, Mohonganj, Netrakona

List of Martyr Freedom Fighters, Ansar & VDP, Bangladesh in Liberation War 1971

  • 1. Abul Hossain, son of Abdul Hamid, Ex-District Adjutant Ansars, Jessore. Address: Sastitola Para, Jessore
  • 2. Fakir Abdul Mazed, Son of Minajuddin Fakir, Ex-District Adjutant, Bakal, Agailjhara, Barisal.
  • 3. K. A. Barkat, son of Najibuddin, Ex-District Adjutant Ansars, Dhaka. Address: Sastitola Para, Jessore
  • 4. Idris Ali, Ex-Typist, Ansars & VDP, Dhaka

Martyred intellectuals' graveyard at Mirpur

The Bir Freedom Fighters and Martyr Freedom Fighters of Ansar & VDP received their certificates on the basis of this list published in this Gazette with the signature of the Honorable Minister/State Minister of Ministry of Freedom affairs, which will be countersigned by the Chief Advisor of the Muktijoddha Sangsad, the Honorable Prime Minister of the Peoples Republic of Bangladesh. They received their certificates From the Honorable Prime Minister of Government of the Peoples Republic Of Bangladesh on 13 February 2013 in the Certificate giving ceremony of Ansar & VDP Academy, Shafipur, Gazipur, Dhaka.

Raising of Ansar battalions

In 1976, 20 Battalions of Ansar were raised in line with the Armed Police Battalions to augment the strength of the security forces. At present, there are 36 Male and two Female Ansar Battalions deployed all over the country. Battalion Ansars are mainly deployed in [2]

Mission and organisation

There are Three Stated Missions of Ansar: 1) To assist Police in maintaining Law and Order in Peace Time, 2) To Assist Bangladesh Armed Forces in National Defence in Wartime and 3) To take part in Nation Building Affairs.[1][2][3] The Ansar are headed by a director-general, a post currently held by Major General Md Nizam Uddin, .[3] The director-general also heads the Village Defence Party (VDPs). The headquarters of the Ansar is located in Dhaka and the Ansar Academy is located at Shafipur Gazipur, north of the national capital, Dhaka.[1] The Ansar often operate alongside the Bangladesh Army and the Bangladesh Police.[1] There are 3 Types of Ansars: Regular Ansars, Embodied Ansars (Armed and Attached to Industrial units, Key Point Installations etc.), and Un-embodied Ansars (Trained but Unarmed Volunteers). The total strength of the Regular Ansar is 20,000, Embodied Ansars 120,000, Un-embodied Ansars strength is close to 5,700,000.[1]

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Library of Congress Country Studies.

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Taru Bahl, M.H. Syed (2003). Encyclopaedia of the Muslim World. Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd. pp. 184–85.  
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "About Bangladesh Ansar & VDP". Bangladesh Ansar & VDP – Government of Bangladesh. Archived from the original on 18 September 2010. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
  3. ^ a b "Bangladesh Ansar & VDP". Bangladesh Ansar & VDP – Government of Bangladesh. Archived from the original on 19 September 2010. Retrieved 2010-09-27. 
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