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Barbara Jordan (tennis)

Barbara Jordan
Country (sports)  United States
Born (1957-04-02) April 2, 1957
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Height 5 ft 5 in (1.65 m)
Plays Right-handed
Singles
Highest ranking No. 37 (December,1980)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open W (1979)
French Open 2R (1981)
Wimbledon 3R (1978, 1980, 1983)
US Open 3R (1979)
Doubles
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open QF (1979)
French Open SF (1984)
Wimbledon 3R (1983)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
French Open W (1983)

Barbara Jordan (born April 2, 1957, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.) is a former professional female tennis player from the United States who won the 1979 Australian Open singles title; $50,000 dollar first prize.

Jordan also won the mixed doubles title at the 1983 French Open with Eliot Teltscher. Jordan was a three-time All-American at Stanford University where she obtained her degree in economics in three years. She won the 1978 AIAW College National doubles with sister, Kathy, in 1978. Jordan made her first appearance on Hewlett-Packard/WITA (WTA) computer in August 1977 at No. 95. Was a five-time member of WITA (WTA) board of directors. Served as chairman of the Tournament Committee in 1980. Jordan also won the USTA under 21-National Championship in 1978 in singles and doubles. [1]She went on to earn her Juris Doctorate from UCLA. She is the sister of tennis player Kathy Jordan.

Contents

  • Grand Slam finals 1
    • Singles 1.1
    • Mixed doubles 1.2
  • References 2
  • External links 3

Grand Slam finals

Singles

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1979 Australian Open Grass Sharon Walsh 6–3, 6–3

Mixed doubles

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score in the final
Winner 1983 French Open Clay Eliot Teltscher Leslie Allen
Charles Strode
6–2, 6–3

HALL OF FAME - Barbara has been inducted in the ITA Women's Hall of Fame, the USTA Hall of Fame, the Stanfor Hall of Fame and others

References

  1. ^ Gossett, Peggy; Teitelbaum, Mike; Bloch Shallouf, Renee; Riach, Ros; Hinkley, Suzanne; Hanlon, Maureen. 1987 WITA Media Guide. p. 139. 

External links



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