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Barron's (newspaper)

Barron's
October 11, 2010 cover of Barron's
Categories Business
Frequency Weekly
Total circulation
(2013)
305,513[1]
Founder Clarence W. Barron
First issue  1921 (1921-month)
Company Dow Jones & Company
Country United States
Based in New York City
Website .com.barronswww
ISSN 1077-8039

Barron's is an American weekly newspaper founded in 1921 by Clarence Barron. It covers U.S. financial information, market developments, and relevant statistics. Each issue provides a wrap-up of the previous week's market activity, news reports, and an informative outlook on the week to come.

Contents

  • Sections 1
  • Popular features 2
  • History 3
  • Statistics 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Sections

Barron's has two sections:[2]

  • "Market Week" – coverage of the previous week's market activity
  • "The Wrap" – analysis and outlook columns

Popular features

  • Barron's Special Report Best Online Brokers (annual) Features a | ranking of the top online trading brokerage firms. Criteria included Trading Experience and Technology, Usability, Mobile, Range of Offerings, Research Amenities, Portfolio Analysis & Report, Customer Service & Education, and Costs.[4]

History

The paper has been published by Dow Jones & Company since 1921. The magazine is named after Clarence W. Barron, one of the most influential figures in the history of Dow Jones, and considered the founder of modern financial journalism. Dow Jones also publishes The Wall Street Journal.

  • Color was introduced in May 1990, and full color in January 1996.
  • Barron's introduced a two-section version of the paper 7 March 1994.
  • Barrons.com launched as part of WSJ.com in 1996 and relaunched as a standalone product in January 2006.
  • Barron’s held its first Financial Advisor conference in 2005.[5]
  • Barron’s acquired the Winner’s Circle Organization in September 2008.[6]
  • Barron’s launched a new section, PENTA, in September 2009. The section targets “pentamillionaires,” individuals with at least $5 million in assets, with financial advice. [7]

Statistics

  • The current editor is Edwin A. Finn Jr., and the newspaper has over 40 news department personnel.
  • Average Magazine circulation for 2012[8] was 305,157.
  • Its readership is 90.8% male, average age of 54, 43.8% of whom attended college, 94% of whom are employed in top management, and have:
    • Average Personal Income: $282,000
    • Average Household Net Worth: $2,960,000
    • Average value of Household securities: $2,736,000
    • Average # securities transactions: 45
    • Average number of years reading Barron’s: 8

(Reader data source: Barron’s 2010 Print Subscriber Survey.[9])

References

  1. ^ "Alliance for Audited Media Snapshot Report - 6/30/2013".  
  2. ^ http://www.dowjones.com/djcom/FactSheets/BarronsFactSheet.pdf
  3. ^ "Barron's Roundtable - 10 Investment Experts Make Stock Picks And Predictions - Barrons.com". Retrieved 28 May 2015. 
  4. ^ Carey, Theresa. "Cut the Cord". Barron’s 2012 Best Online Brokers. Dow Jones & Company, Inc. 
  5. ^ Meet at Barron's Winner's Circle Conference for Financial Advisors; Barron's First-Ever Event Yields Insights into Industry Best Practices"Best of Best". 6 December 2005. Retrieved 28 May 2015. 
  6. ^ "Barron's acquires Winner's Circle". Retrieved 28 May 2015. 
  7. ^ Dow Jones & Company. "Barron's Magazine to Launch New Section Providing Trusted Advice for Pentamillionaires". GlobeNewswire News Room. Retrieved 28 May 2015. 
  8. ^ "Circulation by region, state and printing plant" (PDF). Barron's Magazine. Retrieved 2013-06-07. 
  9. ^ "Reader Profile | Print | Advertising | Barron's Magazine". Barronsmag.com. Retrieved 2013-06-07. 

External links

  • Barrons.com
  • Barron's Subscription
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