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Batavia, Ohio

Batavia, Ohio
Village
Looking east along Main Street
Looking east along Main Street
Motto: Historic past – Bright future
Location of Batavia, Ohio
Location of Batavia, Ohio
Location of Batavia in Clermont County
Location of Batavia in Clermont County
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Ohio
County Clermont
Township Batavia
Settled Fall 1797[1]
Platted October 24, 1814[1]
Incorporated February 10, 1842[1]
Government
 • Mayor John Q. Thebout[2][3]
Area[4]
 • Total 1.62 sq mi (4.20 km2)
 • Land 1.59 sq mi (4.12 km2)
 • Water 0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
Elevation[5] 594 ft (181 m)
Population (2010)[6]
 • Total 1,509
 • Estimate (2012[7]) 1,630
 • Density 949.1/sq mi (366.4/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 45103
Area code(s) 513
FIPS code 39-04150[8]
GNIS feature ID 1037672[5]
Website .orgbataviavillage

Batavia ([9] ) is a village in and the county seat of Clermont County, Ohio, United States.[10] The population was 1,509 at the 2010 census. Batavia is located at (39.077332, -84.179160).[11]

Contents

  • Geography 1
  • Transportation 2
  • History 3
  • Demographics 4
    • 2010 census 4.1
    • 2000 census 4.2
  • Economy 5
  • Education 6
  • Media and attractions 7
  • Notable people 8
  • References 9
  • External links 10

Geography

Batavia corporation limit sign

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.62 square miles (4.20 km2), of which 1.59 square miles (4.12 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water.[4] It is surrounded by Batavia Township.

Transportation

Batavia is located along Ohio State Route 32, also known as the Appalachian Highway, a major east-west highway that connects Interstate 275 and the Cincinnati area to the rural counties of Southern Ohio. State Routes Ohio State Route 132 and 222 also pass through the village's downtown area.

The Clermont Transportation Connection provides daily bus service to downtown Cincinnati.

History

Batavia was surveyed on May 28, 1788, by Captain Francis Minnis, John O'Bannon, Nicholas Keller, Archelus Price, and John Ormsley. Virginian Ezekiel Dimmitt became the area's first settler in the fall of 1797. George Ely purchased the Minnis survey in 1807 and platted the town on October 24, 1814, possibly naming it after Batavia, New York. The Clermont County seat moved from New Richmond to Batavia on February 24, 1824. Batavia finally incorporated as a village on February 10, 1842.[1]

The interurban railroad, also ran through town from 1903 to 1934. Norfolk Southern can sometimes roll through Batavia about 3 times a day. [1]

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[6] of 2010, there were 1,509 people, 629 households, and 411 families residing in the village. The population density was 949.1 inhabitants per square mile (366.4/km2). There were 713 housing units at an average density of 448.4 per square mile (173.1/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 93.6% White, 3.4% African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.9% of the population.

There were 629 households of which 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.7% were married couples living together, 16.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.7% were non-families. 30.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.91.

The median age in the village was 37.7 years. 24.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.5% were from 25 to 44; 27.3% were from 45 to 64; and 13.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 47.1% male and 52.9% female.

2000 census

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 1,617 people, 651 households, and 453 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,105.4 people per square mile (427.6/km²). There were 696 housing units at an average density of 475.8 per square mile (184.1/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 94.50% White, 3.28% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.25% from other races, and 1.55% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.37% of the population.

There were 651 households out of which 34.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.2% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.3% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the village the population was spread out with 25.9% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 23.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 97.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.5 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $40,804, and the median income for a family was $50,238. Males had a median income of $36,190 versus $25,583 for females. The per capita income for the village was $20,171. About 6.4% of families and 6.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.4% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Batavia was home to Ford Motor Company's Batavia Transmission plant until it closed in 2009 under a corporate plan called "The Way Forward". Batavia anchored an industrial area that also includes rollercoaster manufacturer Clermont Steel Fabricators.

Education

UC East at the former Batavia Transmission plant

University of Cincinnati Clermont College, a regional campus of the University of Cincinnati, is located in Batavia. UC Clermont's satellite campus, UC East, operates out of the administrative offices of the former Ford plant.

Batavia and the surrounding township belongs to the Batavia Local School District. The village annexed its only high school, Batavia High School, in 2012.[14]

Media and attractions

WOBO-FM broadcasts from Batavia at 88.7 MHz. The Clermont Sun has published weekly from Batavia since 1828.[1] The Tri-State Warbird Museum is located at the Clermont County Airport in Batavia.[15]

Notable people

The following notable people have lived in Batavia:

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Crawford, Richard. "History of Batavia Township". Retrieved September 16, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Administration". Village of Batavia. July 18, 2013. Retrieved September 16, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Thebout elected president of Clermont County Mayor’s Association".  
  4. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  5. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  6. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  7. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  8. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  9. ^ "scrippsjschool.org/pronunciation/". 
  10. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  12. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  13. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  14. ^ Bednarski, Kristin (September 14, 2012). "Commissioners approve Batavia annexation". The Clermont Sun (Batavia, Ohio). Retrieved September 16, 2013. 
  15. ^ Tri-state War Bird Museum

External links

  • Village website
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