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Bayous

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Bayous

A bayou (/ˈb./ or /ˈbjuː/) is a Franco-English term for a body of water typically found in flat, low-lying area, and can refer either to an extremely slow-moving stream or river (often with a poorly defined shoreline), or to a marshy lake or wetland. The name "bayou" can also refer to a creek whose current reverses daily due to tides and which contains brackish water highly conducive to fish life and plankton. Bayous are commonly found in the Gulf Coast region of the southern United States, notably the Mississippi River region, with the state of Louisiana being famous for them. A bayou is frequently an anabranch or minor braid of a braided channel that is moving much more slowly than the mainstem, often becoming boggy and stagnant. Though vegetation varies by region, many bayous are home to crawfish, certain species of shrimp, other shellfish, catfish, frogs, toads, American alligators, American crocodiles, herons, turtles and a myriad of other species.


Etymology

The word was first used by the English in Louisiana and is thought to originate from the Choctaw word "bayuk", which means "small stream".[1] The first settlements of Acadians in southern Louisiana were near Bayou Teche and other bayous,[2] which led to a close association of the bayou with Cajun culture.

An alternative spelling — buyou — has also been used, as in "Pine Buyou", used in a description by Congress in 1833 of Arkansas Territory.

Geography

Bayou Country is most closely associated with Cajun and Creole cultural groups native to the Gulf Coast region generally stretching from Houston, Texas, to Mobile, Alabama, and picking back up in South Florida around the Everglades with its center in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Notable examples

See also

References

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