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Ben Eaves

For the British basketball player, see Ben Eaves (basketball).
Ben Eaves
Born (1982-03-27) March 27, 1982 (age 32)
Minneapolis, MN, USA
Height 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Weight 179 lb (81 kg; 12 st 11 lb)
Position Center
Played for Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins
Espoo Blues
Milwaukee Admirals
Jokerit
NHL Draft 131st overall, 2001
Pittsburgh Penguins
Playing career 2004–2013

Benjamin Coel Eaves (born March 27, 1982) is an American retired professional ice hockey Center. He is the son of retired NHL player Mike Eaves, and brother of Patrick Eaves of the Detroit Red Wings.

Playing career

Eaves went to high school at Shattuck-St. Mary's school in Faribault, Minnesota. Eaves was drafted 131st overall by the Pittsburgh Penguins in the 2001 NHL Entry Draft. He spent four seasons at Boston College before turning pro in 2004. He signed an entry-level contract with the Penguins, but with the 2004–05 NHL season locked out and eventually cancelled, he split the season with the AHL's Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins and the ECHL's Wheeling Nailers. He missed majority of 2005–06 season and entire 2006–07 season recovering from knee injuries.

In November 2007 he signed for the Espoo Blues in SM-liiga where he played rest of the season, although missing majority of it due to several injuries. He continued in the team for the following season. On 13 December 2008 he took a break due to injury, he made his comeback on 28 January 2009.

During the SM-liiga playoffs 2009 Ben Eaves broke the record of Kari Jalonen (season 1980/81) and Hannes Hyvönen (2007/08) for the most points scored during the playoffs (21 points). Eaves managed to score 24 points (4 goals and 20 assists) in 13 games with the Espoo Blues.

On July 21, 2009, Eaves signed a one-year, two-way contract with the Nashville Predators.[1] On November 2, 2009 Eaves left the Predators' AHL affiliate Milwaukee Admirals and announced his retirement from hockey due to a lingering knee injury.[2]

In the following season, however, he came out of retirement and joined Jokerit of Finnish SM-liiga in August 2010. In his return to Finland, Eaves successfully established himself amongst Jokerit's scoring forwards. He was selected as the MVP of the European trophy tournament of the 2011–12 season. In his third season with Jokerit, Eaves was again plagued by injury, suffering a concussion before briefly returning for the playoffs.

In preparation for the 2013–14 season with Jokerit, Eaves suffered a relapse of concussion symptoms and on August 16, 2013, announced his retirement from professional hockey for a second time.[3]

Career statistics

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2000–01 Boston College HE 41 13 26 39 12
2001–02 Boston College HE 23 13 26 39 12
2002–03 Boston College HE 36 18 39 57 18
2003–04 Boston College HE 26 9 25 34 4
2004–05 Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins AHL 43 4 6 10 12 7 0 0 0 0
2004–05 Wheeling Nailers ECHL 2 1 0 1 0
2005–06 Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins AHL 5 1 2 3 0
2007–08 Espoo Blues SM-l 10 3 4 7 4 13 7 5 12 8
2008–09 Espoo Blues SM-l 22 3 15 18 18 14 4 20 24 6
2009–10 Milwaukee Admirals AHL 7 1 2 3 4
2010–11 Jokerit SM-l 44 9 17 26 30 7 1 5 6 10
2011–12 Jokerit SM-l 44 13 21 34 22 7 0 3 3 2
2012–13 Jokerit SM-l 9 2 1 3 4 1 1 0 1 2
AHL totals 55 6 10 16 16 7 0 0 0 0
SM-liiga totals 130 30 58 88 78 42 13 33 46 28

Awards and honors

Award Year
All-Hockey East Rookie Team 2000–01
All-Hockey East Second Team 2001–02
All-Hockey East First Team 2002–03

References

External links

  • The Internet Hockey Database
  • Elite Prospects
Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Darren Haydar
Hockey East Player of the Year
(Shared With Mike Ayers)

2002–03
Succeeded by
Steve Saviano
Preceded by
Colin Hemingway
Hockey East Three-Stars Award
(Shared With Joe Exter)

2002–03
Succeeded by
Keni Gibson
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