Beth Israel Medical Center

Beth Israel Medical Center
Mount Sinai Health System
Geography
Location First Avenue at 16th Street, New York, NY, United States
Coordinates

Coordinates: 40°44′01″N 73°58′57″W / 40.7335°N 73.9826°W / 40.7335; -73.9826

Organization
Care system Template:Infobox hospital/care system
Funding Non-profit hospital
Hospital type Teaching
Affiliated university Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Services
Emergency department Level II trauma center
Beds 1,368
History
Founded 1890
Links
Website
Lists Template:Infobox hospital/lists


Beth Israel Medical Center is a 1,368-bed, full-service tertiary teaching hospital in New York City. Originally dedicated to serving immigrant Jews living in the tenement slums of the Lower East Side, it was founded at the turn of the 20th century. The main hospital building is known as the Petrie Division, located at First Avenue and 16th Street facing Stuyvesant Square. Other campuses included Beth Israel-Kings Highway Division in Brooklyn and Phillips Ambulatory Care Center at Union Square.

It is an academic affiliate of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Beth Israel Medical Center is a member of the Mount Sinai Health System, a nonprofit health system formed by the merger of Continuum Health Partners and The Mount Sinai Medical Center in September 2013.

Name

Beth Israel is Hebrew for "House of Israel".

History

Beth Israel was incorporated in 1890 by a group of 40 Orthodox Jews on the Lower East Side each of whom paid 25 cents to set up a hospital serving New York's Jewish immigrants, particularly newcomers. At the time New York's hospitals would not treat patients who had been in the city less than a year. It initially opened a dispensary on the Lower East Side. In 1891 it opened a 20-bed hospital and in 1892 expanded again and moved into a 115-bed hospital in 1902.[1]

In 1929 it moved into a 13-story, 500-bed building at its current location at the corner of Stuyvesant Square. It purchased its neighbor the Manhattan General Hospital in 1964 and renamed the complex Beth Israel Medical Center, located at First Avenue and 16th Street in Manhattan. [1]

By the 1980s it had long extended beyond its Jewish base. In 1988 it had the largest network of heroin-treatment clinics in the United States with 7,500 patients and 23 facilities.[1]

It acquired Doctors Hospital on the Upper East Side in the 1990s, renaming it Beth Israel Medical Center-Singer Division, and Kings Highway Hospital Center in 1995, renaming it Beth Israel Medical Center-Kings Highway Division.

In 2004, Beth Israel Medical Center closed the Singer Division and consolidated its Manhattan inpatient operations at the main hospital campus, called the Petrie Division, on First Avenue at 16th Street in Manhattan.

As of 2010 Beth Israel Medical Center has residency training programs in nearly every major field of medicine including: Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Surgery, ENT, Oral Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Radiology, Family Medicine, Dermatology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Neurology, Ophthalmology, Pathology, Psychiatry, Podiatry, and Urology. Continuum Health Partners which owns Beth Israel provides resident trainees with subsidized housing and a competitive salary. In 2011 Huguette Clark died at the hospital at age 104. She left one million dollars to the hospital upon her death.

References

External links

  • Official website
  • Nursing school

Template:Continuum Health Partners Template:Hospitals in New York City

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.