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Boingo Wireless

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Boingo Wireless

Boingo Wireless, Inc.
Type Public
Traded as NASDAQ: WIFI
Industry Computer software, IT services
Founded Los Angeles, CA (2001)
Founders Sky Dayton
Headquarters 10960 Wilshire Blvd.
Suite 800
Los Angeles, CA
Key people Sky Dayton,
Founder;
David Hagan,
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board;
Nick Hulse,
President
Products Software technology and roaming services for wireless networks
Revenue Increase US$ 106.7 million (2013)[1]
Website Boingo.com

Boingo Wireless is an American company that provides global wireless services.[2] The company is headquartered in Los Angeles, California.

History

Boingo was founded in 2001 by Earthlink co-founder Sky Dayton to address the then fragmented state of Wi-Fi networks.[3] He saw how Wi-Fi "could help make the Internet as ubiquitous as the air we breathe."[4]

In March 2007, Boingo acquired Concourse Communications Group,[5] which extended Boingo's services into Wi-Fi and cellular DAS networks at airports.[5][6] On November 10, 2008, Boingo acquired Opti-Fi Networks’ Wi-Fi holdings, adding another 25 airport Wi-Fi networks to its portfolio of managed locations and bringing its total of airport Wi-Fi networks to 55.[7]

On May 4, 2011, Boingo Wireless went public, giving the company a market cap of approximately $439 million. The stock price dropped soon afterward, and Boingo's IPO was initially viewed as "less than auspicious",[8] but the stock recovered a year later to its IPO price.[9]

The company acquired Cloud Nine Media on August 8, 2012, adding ad services for sponsored Wi-Fi.[10]

On February 21, 2013, the company acquired Endeka Group, a provider of Wi-Fi and IPTV services to military bases and federal law enforcement training facilities.[11] In November 2013, Boingo announced contracts with the US Army, US Marines Corps and Air Force to install IPTV and broadband access networks on their posts.[12]

In September 2013, Boingo announced the acquisition of its largest competitor, Advanced Wireless Group (AWG).[13] At the time of the announcement, AWG operated networks at 17 US airports, including Los Angeles International (LAX), Miami International Airport, Detroit Metropolitan Airport and Logan Airport in Boston. Boingo announced that the combined entity will operate in 60 percent of North America’s top 50 airports and more than 40 percent of the world’s top 50 airports, reaching more than 1.4 billion passengers annually.[14]

As of January 2014, Boingo's market cap stood at $225.55 million.[15]

Products and services

Boingo's business model is to offer services in three areas: wholesale, retail and advertising.[1]

  • Wholesale - Boingo has an integrated hardware and software platform used to provide a range of Wi-Fi related services to telecom operators, network operators, device manufacturers, technology companies, enterprise software and services companies, and venue operators.
    • Distributed antenna system (DAS) - Boingo sells telecommunications companies access to a network of distributed Wi-Fi antennas at managed hotspot locations. The system is deployed within airports and other locations that require additional signal strength to improve the quality of cellular services.[16]
    • Roaming services - Boingo sells roaming services across a network of over 800,000 hotspot locations to business partners, who use this service to provide mobile Internet services to their customers. The company is integrating Hotspot 2.0 technology, allowing users to automatically connect when within range of free Wi-Fi service.[17]
    • Platform services - Boingo licenses their proprietary software and provides software integration and development services to customers, allowing them to sell their own Wi-Fi services.
    • Turn-key solutions - Boingo sells turn-key Wi-Fi solutions to venue operators, including installation, management and operation.
  • Retail - Boingo sells Wi-Fi access to end users at a network of managed and operated hotspots and third party locations around the world. Payment plans include a selection of month-to-month subscription and single-use access plans. The subscription model and multiple pricing options has led to some confusion when customers didn't realize they had signed up for recurring service.[18] The company also provides residential broadband and IPTV services for troops stationed on U.S. military bases. To support its retail model, the company produces a database of available Wi-Fi locations for customers, available on the website and as a downloadable app called Wi-Finder for PCs, Macs, and Android and iOS devices.
  • Advertising - Boingo sells advertising on its Wi-Fi platform, through landing page access and display advertising. Advertisers sponsor free Wi-Fi access in exchange for consumers viewing advertising such as offers and video placements.[19]

Awards and recognition

Global Traveler's Award - 2013 - Best Wi-Fi Service [20]

About.com Readers Award - 2012 - Best iPhone/iPad Travel App: Boingo Wi-Finder[21]

References

  1. ^ a b "Boingo Wireless Inc Form 10-K". United States Securities and Exchange Commission. 
  2. ^ "BOINGO WIRELESS INC (WIFI:NASDAQ GS): Stock Quote & Company Profile - Businessweek". investing.businessweek.com. Retrieved 14 June 2012. 
  3. ^ "Day 2 at 802.11 Planet Conference - Wi-Fi Networking News". Wifinetnews.com. 2002-12-04. Retrieved 2014-02-18. 
  4. ^ "Sky Dayton, founder of Boingo Wireless - Where are they now?". FierceWireless.om. 2013-06-18. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  5. ^ a b Ron (2006-05-22). "Boingo Wireless Acquires Airport Cellular, Wi-Fi Operator Concourse Communications - Wi-Fi Networking News". Wifinetnews.com. Retrieved 2014-02-18. 
  6. ^ Fri, 03/02/2007 - 6:19pm. "Boingo Completes Concourse Buy". Wirelessweek.com. Retrieved 2014-02-18. 
  7. ^ "Boingo Acquires Opti-Fi To Boost Airport Wi-Fi". InformationWeek. Retrieved 2014-02-18. 
  8. ^ "Boingo Wireless IPO Finds Lukewarm Reception On Day One". Forbes. 2011-04-05. Retrieved 2014-02-18. 
  9. ^ "Gogo Files For $165 Million IPO". Benzinga.com. 2013-06-10. Retrieved 2014-04-25. 
  10. ^ "MediaPost Publications Boingo Buys Wi-Fi Startup Cloud Nine Media 08/08/2012". Mediapost.com. Retrieved 2014-02-18. 
  11. ^ "Boingo Wireless (WIFI) to Acquire Endeka". Streetinsider.com. 2013-02-21. Retrieved 2014-02-18. 
  12. ^ "Boingo supports the troops with IPTV, winning contracts to connect U.S. military bases". gigaom.com. 2013-11-08. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  13. ^ "Boingo Wireless Acquires Advanced Wireless Group". CommercialObserver.com. 2013-10-13. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  14. ^ "Boingo Acquires AWG, Combining Airport Industry’s 2 Largest Wi-Fi Providers". AirportRevenueNews.com. 2013-09-26. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  15. ^ Boingo at Yahoo! Finance
  16. ^ "Stadium Tech Report: Boingo, AT&T answer call for more DAS bandwidth at Chicago’s Soldier Field". MobileSportsReport.com. 2013-12-26. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  17. ^ "Wi-Fi roaming starts to take flight with Hotspot 2.0". PCWorld.com. 2014-02-24. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  18. ^ "Boingo Wireless user reviews". Retrieved 22 March 2013. 
  19. ^ "Boingo's Cloud Nine deal shows how public Wi-Fi is changing". FierceWireless.com. 2012-08-08. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  20. ^ "Global Traveler announces the cream of the crop of 2013". GlobalTravelerUSA.com. 2013-12-01. Retrieved 2014-05-01. 
  21. ^ "Readers Choice Awards - 2012". About.com. 2012-12-31. Retrieved 2014-05-01. 

External links

  • Company homepage
  • CSEC allegedly spying on Canadian Wi-Fi users [1]
  • BBC reports on CBC report of CSEC spying allegations [2]
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