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Boldenone

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Boldenone

Boldenone
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(8R,9S,10R,13S,14S,17S)-17-Hydroxy-10,13-dimethyl-6,7,8,9,10,11, 12,13,14,15,16,17-dodecahydro-3H-cyclopenta[a]phenanthren-3-one
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com
Pregnancy
category
Legal status
Routes of
administration
Intramuscular
Pharmacokinetic data
Biological half-life 14 days
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number  YesY
ATC code None
PubChem CID:
DrugBank  YesY
ChemSpider  YesY
UNII  YesY
ChEBI  YesY
ChEMBL  N
Chemical data
Formula C19H26O2
Molecular mass
Documentation

Physical data
Melting point 165 °C (329 °F)
 N   

Boldenone (1,4-androstadiene-3-one-17β-ol, also known under the trade names Equipoise, Ganabol, Equigan and Ultragan) is an anabolic steroid. It is often formulated as the undecylenate ester.

Effects and side-effects

The activity of boldenone is mainly anabolic, with a low androgenic potency. Boldenone will increase nitrogen retention, protein synthesis, increases appetite and stimulates the release of erythropoietin in the kidneys. Boldenone was synthesized in an attempt to create a long-acting injectable methandrostenolone (Dianabol), for androgen deficiency disorders. Boldenone acts similar to methandrostenolone with less adverse androgenic effects. Although commonly compared to nandrolone, boldenone lacks progesterone receptor interaction and all the associated progestogenic side effects.

Use in sports

Baseball

Boldenone is among the substances banned by Major League Baseball, as well as most other major athletic organizations.

Los Angeles Angels minor league outfielder Reynaldo Ruiz in September 2010[1] and Philadelphia Phillies minor league pitcher San Lazaro Solano in January 2011[2] each received a 50-game suspension for the 2011 season as a result of testing positive for a metabolite of boldenone.

Martial arts

Stephan Bonnar and Josh Barnett, mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters from the UFC and PRIDE Fighting Championships, have also tested positive for the banned substance.[3] After the World Extreme Cagefighting show on January 20, 2006 Muay Thai turned MMA fighter Kit Cope also tested positive for Boldenone.[4] Following the Strikeforce card on June 22, 2007 former PRIDE and UFC fighter Phil Baroni tested positive for Boldenone, as well as Stanozolol.[5] Most recently, at a K-1 WGP event in Las Vegas on August 17, 2007 two fighters, Rickard Nordstrand and Zabit Samedov, both tested positive for Boldenone.[6] Alexandre Franca Nogueira has tested positive for boldenone in July 2008.[7]

Australian Football League

Justin Charles, a former minor league baseball player with the Florida Marlins, of Richmond FC tested positive for the substance in 1997 and was suspended for 16 matches.[8]

Major League Soccer

Jon Conway (goal keeper) and Jeff Parke (defender) of the New York Red Bulls both tested positive for the substance in 2008 and were suspended 10 games and fined 10% of their annual income. They are also the first to abuse MLS drug policy.[9]

Horse racing

Leading horse trainer Gai Waterhouse has been fined $10,000 after being found guilty on the 15th of May 2008 of presenting a horse to the races with a prohibited substance in its system. Her horse Perfectly Poised was found to have traces of the banned substance boldenone in its system after finishing second at Canterbury in April 2007.[10]

See also

References

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  7. ^ http://www.sherdog.com/news/news.asp?n_id=13588
  8. ^ http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/afl/justin-charles-claims-afl-cover-up-in-drug-scandal/story-e6frf9jf-1226082374363
  9. ^ http://soccernet.espn.go.com/news/story?id=582565&sec=mls&cc=5901
  10. ^
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