Brooke-class frigate


USS Brooke (FFG-1)
Class overview
Builders: Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Company, Seattle, WA
Bath Iron Works
Operators: US Navy
Preceded by: Garcia class frigate
Succeeded by: Knox class frigate and Oliver Hazard Perry class frigate
Built: 1962–1968
In commission: 1966–1989
Planned: 19
Completed: 6
Retired: 6
General characteristics
Type: Guided missile frigate
Displacement: 2,640 tons std
3,426 tons full
Length: 414 ft (126 m)
Beam: 44 ft (13 m)
Draft: 14 ft 6 in (4.42 m) (keel)
24 ft (7.3 m) (sonar)
Propulsion: 2 Foster-Wheeler boilers, 1 GE (1-3) or Westinghouse (4-6) geared turbine, 35,000 shp, 1 screw
Speed: 27.2 knots
Range: 4,000 nautical miles
Complement: 14 officers, 214 crew
Sensors and
processing systems:
AN/SPS-52 3D air search radar
AN/SPS-10 surface search radar
AN/SPG-51 missile fire control radar
AN/SQS-26 bow mounted sonar[1]
Electronic warfare
& decoys:
AN/SLQ-32
Armament: 1x5"/38 caliber gun
1x Mk 22 RIM-24 Tartar/RIM-66 Standard missile launcher (16 missiles)
1x8 cell ASROC launcher
2x3 12.75 in (324mm) Mk 32 torpedo tubes, Mk 46 torpedoes
2 x MK 37 torpedo tubes (fixed, stern, removed later)
Aircraft carried: 1 SH-2 Seasprite

The Brooke class was a United States Navy frigate class that is based on the Garcia class, but with the addition of the Tartar Guided Missile Fire Control System.

Description

Brooke class ships were nearly identical to the Garcia class, except the second 5"/38 caliber gun was replaced with a Tartar missile system and electronics. Brooke class ships also had the AN/SPS-52 3D air search radar instead of the two dimension AN/SPS-40 and added the AN/SPG-51 for target tracking and missile guidance. The Mk 22, single arm, 16 missile launcher was placed midships.

FFG-1 through FFG-3 had a Westinghouse geared steam turbine while FFG-4 through FFG-6 employed a General Electric turbine. All ships had two Foster-Wheeler boilers. FFG-4 through FFG-6 had an angled base of the bridge structure behind the ASROC launcher for automatic reloading.

The Brooke class was originally designed to carry the DASH drone, but were later equipped with LAMPS SH-2 Seasprite after the hangar was enlarged.[2]

Oliver Hazard Perry class systems were evaluated on USS Talbot (FFG-4) including the Otobreda 76 mm gun, the AN/SQS-56 sonar and other systems.[2][3]

Initially authorized as guided missile destroyer escorts (DEG), FFG-1 through FFG-3 were authorized in FY1962 while FFG-4 through FFG-6 were authorized in FY1963. Plans called for ten more ships to be authorized in FY1964 and possibly three more in later years, but those plans were dropped because of the $11 million higher cost of the DEG over an FF.

Units

Ship Name Hull No. Builder Commission–
Decommission
Fate Link
USS Brooke (FFG-1) FFG-1 Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Company, Seattle 1966–1988 Disposed of by Navy title transfer to the Maritime Administration, 28 March 1994 [1]
USS Ramsey (FFG-2) FFG-2 Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Company, Seattle 1967–1988 Disposed of in support of Fleet training exercise, 15 June 2000 [2]
USS Schofield (FFG-3) FFG-3 Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Company, Seattle 1968–1988 Disposed of in support of Fleet training exercise, 11/02/1999 [3]
USS Talbot (FFG-4) FFG-4 Bath Iron Works 1967–1988 Disposed of by Navy title transfer to the Maritime Administration, 28 March 1994 [4]
USS Richard L. Page (FFG-5) FFG-5 Bath Iron Works 1967–1988 Disposed of by Navy title transfer to the Maritime Administration, 28 March 1994 [5]
USS Julius A. Furer (FFG-6) FFG-6 Bath Iron Works 1967–1989 Disposed of by Navy title transfer to the Maritime Administration, 28 March 1994 [6]

Gallery

Notes

References

External links

  • Destroyer History Foundation
  • http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/ffg-1.htm


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.