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Burgas Airport

Burgas Airport
Летище Бургас

ICAO: LBBG

BOJ is located in Bulgaria
BOJ
Location of airport in Bulgaria
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner Fraport
Operator Fraport Twin Star Airport Management
Serves Burgas
Location Burgas, Bulgaria
Hub for
Elevation AMSL 41 m / 135 ft
Coordinates
Website
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
04/22 3,200 10,500 Concrete
Statistics (2014)
Passengers 2,522,319
Aircraft movements 18,869
Source: Belgian EUROCONTROL

Burgas Airport (ICAO: LBBG), (Bulgarian: Летище Бургас, Letishte Burgas) is an airport in southeast Bulgaria and the second largest airport in the country. The airport is located near to the north neighbourhood of Burgas, Sarafovo almost 10 kilometres from the city centre. Between the airport and the city centre is located the Lake Atanasovsko. The airport serves Burgas and seaside resorts of Bulgarian south coast. In 2014, the airport handled 2,522,319 passengers, a 2.0% increase compared to 2013.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Facilities 2
  • Airlines and destinations 3
    • Scheduled flights 3.1
    • Charter Flights 3.2
    • Cargo 3.3
  • Statistics 4
  • Ground transportation 5
    • Bus 5.1
    • Taxi 5.2
    • Parking 5.3
  • Incidents and accidents 6
  • See also 7
  • References 8
  • External links 9

History

On 27 June 1937 the French company CIDNA (now part of Air France), chose the area of Burgas Airport to build a radio station and signed a contract with the Bulgarian government for its use. The contract expressly stated that the staff of Burgas Airport would be Bulgarian.

On 29 June 1947, Balkan Bulgarian Airlines began domestic flights between Burgas, Plovdiv and Sofia, using Junkers Ju 52/3m aircraft. In the 1950s and 1960s the airport was expanded and modernized by building a concrete runway. In 1970, the airport became an international airport serving 45 destinations.[1]

Burgas airport has been subject to heavy traffic following the growing tourism industry in Bulgaria and was in need of major investments to expand and handle projected passenger traffic. In June 2006, the Bulgarian Government awarded Fraport AG Frankfurt Airport Services Worldwide a 35-year-long concession on both Varna and Burgas airports in return for investments exceeding €500 million.

Fraport entered into partnership with Varna-based company BM Star. The concessionaire has vowed to inject 403 million Euro in the two airports during the lifespan of the arrangement. Fraport will pay 60% of an investment of EUR 403 million over the 35-year concession. The investments will be made in new terminal facilities, vehicles and equipment and expanding apron areas at the airports over the life of the concession

On 18 July 2012 a bomb exploded on a passenger bus transporting Israeli tourists at the Burgas Airport. The explosion killed seven people and injured thirty-two (see 2012 Burgas bus bombing).

Facilities

In December 2011 construction work began on the new Terminal 2. The new terminal was planned to have a capacity of 2,700,000 passengers and 31 check-in desks and covers an area of 20,000 square metres (220,000 sq ft). The new terminal building was designed so that it can be easily upgraded to further increase capacity, if necessary. Construction of new terminal was completed in 2013 and has been in service since December 2013.[2]

Only Terminal 2 is handling passenger traffic at Burgas Airport. Terminal 1, which was built in the 1950s and expanded in the early 1990s, had become functionally obsolete and ceased operations in late 2013 following the opening of the new state-of-the-art Terminal 2, which now handles the entire airport passengers traffic. The terminal is equipped with 31 check-in counters, three boarding-card checkpoints, nine security lanes and eight departure gates. The arrivals area (divided into Schengen and non-Schengen zones) has 12 immigration stations and four baggage carousels (one 120 metres (390 ft) long and three 70 metres (230 ft) long carousels). Passenger amenities include 800 square metres (8,600 sq ft) of space dedicated to shopping and 1,220 square metres (13,100 sq ft) for food and beverage (F&B) services. There is also a 550 square metres (5,900 sq ft) outdoor courtyard.

Burgas Airport has the fourth runway length on the Balkans (3,200 metres (10,500 ft)) after Athens Airport, Sofia Airport and Belgrade Airport.

Airlines and destinations

There are domestic and international flights to about 109 destinations in 31 countries, by more than 57 Bulgarian and foreign airlines (season 2015). The busiest season for the airport is from the end of April to the beginning of October.

Scheduled flights

Airlines Destinations
Aer Lingus Seasonal: Dublin
Aeroflot
operated by Rossiya
Seasonal: Saint Petersburg
airBaltic Seasonal: Riga[3]
BH Air Seasonal: Aberdeen, Astana, Belfast-International, Billund, Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Copenhagen, Doncaster/Sheffield, Edinburgh, Glasgow-International, Humberside, Leeds/Bradford, London-Gatwick, London-Stansted, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne, Norwich, Nottingham/East Midlands, Zürich
Bulgaria Air Sofia, Varna
Seasonal: Moscow-Sheremetyevo, Saint Petersburg, Tel Aviv-Ben Gurion[4]
Dniproavia Seasonal: Dnipropetrovsk
Germania Seasonal: Bremen[5]
Germanwings Seasonal: Düsseldorf, Stuttgart
Jetairfly[6] Seasonal: Brussels, Ostend/Bruges (begins 2016)
Luxair Seasonal: Luxembourg
Norwegian Air Shuttle Seasonal: Copenhagen, Helsinki, Oslo-Gardermoen, Stockholm-Arlanda
S7 Airlines Moscow-Domodedovo
Seasonal: Novosibirsk[7]
SmartWings
operated by Travel Service[8]
Seasonal: Brno, Ostrava, Pardubice, Prague
SmartWings
operated by Travel Service Slovakia[8]
Seasonal: Bratislava, Košice
Thomas Cook Airlines Seasonal: Birmingham, Bristol, Glasgow-International, London-Gatwick, London-Stansted, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne, Cardiff (Begins May 28th)
Thomson Airways Seasonal: Belfast-International, Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Dublin, Glasgow-International, London-Gatwick, London-Luton, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne, Nottingham/East Midlands[7]
Transavia Seasonal: Amsterdam[9]
Ural Airlines Seasonal: Samara, Yekaterinburg
Wizz Air London-Luton
Seasonal: Budapest, Katowice, Warsaw-Chopin

Charter Flights

Airlines Destinations
airBaltic Seasonal: Tallinn
Air Berlin Seasonal: Munich
ASL Airlines Ireland Seasonal: Dublin
Air VIA Seasonal: Berlin-Tegel, Dresden, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt, Hannover, Leipzig/Halle, Nuremberg, Tel Aviv-Ben Gurion[7]
Azur Air Seasonal: Moscow-Domodedovo, Surgut
Belavia Seasonal Brest, Gomel,[10] Hrodna, Minsk-National,[7] Mogilev, Vitebsk
BH Air Seasonal: Ålesund, Beirut, Bergen, Harstad/Narvik, Haugesund, Naples, Tromsø, Trondheim, Zakynthos,[7] Leeds
Bulgaria Air Seasonal: Almaty, Amsterdam, Billund, Copenhagen, Gdańsk, Katowice, Kuwait, Pardubice, Poznań, Tel Aviv-Ben Gurion, Warsaw-Chopin, Wroclaw
Bulgarian Air Charter Seasonal: Basel/Mulhouse, Berlin-Schönefeld, Berlin-Tegel, Bratislava, Budapest, Cologne/Bonn, Debrecen, Dresden, Düsseldorf, Erfurt/Weimar, Frankfurt, Graz, Hamburg, Katowice, Košice, Leipzig/Halle, Munich, Paderborn/Lippstadt, Poprad, Poznań, Prague, Rzeszów, Sliač, Stuttgart, Tel Aviv-Ben Gurion, Vienna, Warsaw-Chopin, Wroclaw, Yerevan
Condor Seasonal: Frankfurt, Leipzig/Halle, Manchester[11]
Corendon Dutch Airlines Seasonal: Amsterdam[7]
Dart Aviation Seasonal: Kiev-Zhuliany
Enter Air Seasonal: Bydgoszcz, Gdańsk, Katowice, Lódź, Lublin, Poznań, Szczecin, Warsaw-Chopin, Wroclaw[12]
Europe Airpost Seasonal: Paris-Charles de Gaulle
Germania Seasonal: Düsseldorf, Munich
Ikar Air Seasonal: Moscow-Sheremetyevo
Jetairfly Seasonal: Brussels
Jet Time Seasonal: Billund, Oslo-Gardermoen
Mahan Air Seasonal: Tehran-Imam Khomeini
Malmö Aviation Gothenburg-Landvetter, Malmö
MetroJet Seasonal: Moscow-Domodedovo
Niki Vienna
Seasonal: Salzburg
Nordavia Seasonal: Moscow-Sheremetyevo[7]
NordStar Seasonal: Saint Petersburg
Nordwind Airlines Moscow-Sheremetyevo
Norwegian Air Shuttle Stavanger
Novair Seasonal: Oslo-Gardermoen
Orenair Seasonal: Moscow-Domodedovo
Scandinavian Airlines Seasonal: Gothenburg-Landvetter, Oslo-Gardermoen, Stavanger
Stockholm-Arlanda
Severstal Air Company Seasonal: Cherepovets
Small Planet Airlines Seasonal: Vilnius
Small Planet Airlines Poland Seasonal: Gdańsk, Katowice, Kraków, Poznań, Warsaw-Chopin[7]
SmartLynx Airlines Seasonal: Riga[7]
Smartlynx Airlines Estonia Seasonal: Tallinn[7]
Thomas Cook Airlines Belgium Seasonal: Brussels
Thomas Cook Airlines Scandinavia Seasonal: oHelsinki, Oslo-Gardermoen
Transavia Seasonal: Brussels, Weeze
Travel Service Seasonal: Brno, Ostrava, Pardubice, Prague
Travel Service Hungary Seasonal: Budapest[7]
Travel Service Poland Seasonal: Poznań, Warsaw-Chopin, Wroclaw
Travel Service Slovakia Seasonal: Bratislava, Košice, Poprad, Sliač
TUIfly Nordic Seasonal: Copenhagen, Helsinki, Stockholm-Arlanda
Ukraine International Airlines Kiev-Boryspil
Seasonal: Lviv
UTair Aviation Seasonal: Moscow-Vnukovo
UTair Ukraine Seasonal: Kiev-Boryspil
Windrose Airlines Seasonal: Dnipropetrovsk, Kiev-Boryspil, Lviv[7]
Yamal Airlines Seasonal: Moscow-Domodedovo

Cargo

Airlines Destinations
Kalitta Air
National Airlines
Silk Way Airlines

Statistics

Terminal 2
Control tower

Ground transportation

Bus

Line No 15 (Bus-stop: located at the entrance of the airport area).Initial and final bus stops in Burgas – Burgas bus station "South".[15]

Taxi

The Taxi Piazza is located in front of the Arrivals Terminal at Burgas Airport. A taxi ride from Burgas Airport to the city takes approx 15 minutes, depending on the traffic intensity.[16]

Parking

Passengers and guests arriving at Burgas Airport with their personal car can use the commercially available parking lot, located in the immediate vicinity of the main terminal building. The parking lot has 199 car spaces available and is accessible 24 hours a day.[17]

Incidents and accidents

  • On 18 July 2012, an attack at Burgas Airport occurred. A suicide bomber boarded a bus which was transporting Israeli citizens to the Bulgarian resort of Sunny Beach located in Burgas, the perpetrator detonated the bomb killing 6 civilians (+ 1 suicide bomber) as well as injuring 32 people. The attack resulted in the closure of Burgas Airport for over 30 hours, resulting in the majority of flights diverting to Varna Airport.[18][19]

See also

References

  1. ^ (Bulgarian) http://cholakovv.com/bg/projects/followme
  2. ^ http://www.airport-world.com/home/general-news/item/3413-new-terminal-at-burgas-airport-opens/
  3. ^ J, L (13 March 2014). "airBaltic Adds Bourgas / Varna Seasonal Service in Summer 2014". Airline Route. Retrieved 13 March 2014. 
  4. ^ https://book.air.bg/plnext/bulgarianNew/Override.action#/FDCS
  5. ^ "Germania Summer Flight Schedule / 30.04.2015 - 31.10.2015" (PDF). Germania. 
  6. ^ "Jetairfly Flight Plan". Jetairfly. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Bourgas Airport Schedule". Information and Services. Bourgas Airport. Retrieved 4 March 2013. 
  8. ^ a b "SmartWings Flight schedule". smartwings.com. 
  9. ^ Transavia.com destinations map
  10. ^ Belavia begin new charter service to Gomel from summer 2014
  11. ^ Condor begin new service from Manchester to Burgas from May 2015
  12. ^ Enter Air route map and destinations
  13. ^ http://www.fraport.com/content/fraport-ag/en/investor_relations/traffic_data0/fraport_group.html
  14. ^ http://www.fraport.de/content/fraport/de/misc/binaer/investor-relations/verkehrszahlen/2015/verkehrszahlen-sept-2015/jcr:content.file/verkehrszahlen-september-2015.pdf
  15. ^ http://www.bourgas-airport.com/Portals/0/How%20to%20get%20there%20by%20bus%20BOJ_ENG.pdf
  16. ^ http://www.bourgas-airport.com/Portals/0/How%20to%20get%20there%20by%20taxi%20BOJ_ENG.pdf
  17. ^ http://www.bourgas-airport.com/PassengerServices/Parking/tabid/179/language/en-US/Default.aspx
  18. ^ http://www.timesofisrael.com/explosion-rocks-israeli-tour-bus-in-bulgaria Attack Ref 1
  19. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/20/world/europe/explosion-on-bulgaria-tour-bus-kills-at-least-five-israelis.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all Attack Ref 2

External links

  • Official website
  • FOLLOW ME film about Burgas Airport
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