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Cxcl11

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Title: Cxcl11  
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Cxcl11

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 11

PDB rendering based on 1rjt.
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe, RCSB
Identifiers
Symbols  ; H174; I-TAC; IP-9; IP9; SCYB11; SCYB9B; b-R1
External IDs GeneCards:
RNA expression pattern
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl n/a
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)
RefSeq (protein)
Location (UCSC) n/a
PubMed search

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 11 (CXCL11)[1] is a small cytokine belonging to the CXC chemokine family that is also called Interferon-inducible T-cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC) and Interferon-gamma-inducible protein 9 (IP-9). It is highly expressed in peripheral blood leukocytes, pancreas and liver, with moderate levels in thymus, spleen and lung and low expression levels were in small intestine, placenta and prostate.[2] Gene expression of CXCL11 is strongly induced by IFN-γ and IFN-β, and weakly induced by IFN-α.[3] This chemokine elicits its effects on its target cells by interacting with the cell surface chemokine receptor CXCR3, with a higher affinity than do the other ligands for this receptor, CXCL9 and CXCL10.[2][4] CXCL11 is chemotactic for activated T cells. Its gene is located on human chromosome 4 along with many other members of the CXC chemokine family.[5][6]

References

  1. ^ "Entrez Gene: CXCL11 chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 11". 
  2. ^ a b Cole KE, Strick CA, Paradis TJ, Ogborne KT, Loetscher M, Gladue RP, Lin W, Boyd JG, Moser B, Wood DE, Sahagan BG, Neote K (1998). "Interferon–inducible T Cell Alpha Chemoattractant (I-TAC): A Novel Non-ELR CXC Chemokine with Potent Activity on Activated T Cells through Selective High Affinity Binding to CXCR3". J. Exp. Med. 187 (12): 2009–21.  
  3. ^ Rani MR, Foster GR, Leung S, Leaman D, Stark GR, Ransohoff RM (1996). "Characterization of beta-R1, a gene that is selectively induced by interferon beta (IFN-beta) compared with IFN-alpha". J. Biol. Chem. 271 (37): 22878–84.  
  4. ^ Tensen CP, Flier J, Van Der Raaij-Helmer EM, Sampat-Sardjoepersad S, Van Der Schors RC, Leurs R, Scheper RJ, Boorsma DM, Willemze R (1999). "Human IP-9: A keratinocyte-derived high affinity CXC-chemokine ligand for the IP-10/Mig receptor (CXCR3)". J. Invest. Dermatol. 112 (5): 716–22.  
  5. ^ Erdel M, Laich A, Utermann G, Werner ER, Werner-Felmayer G (1998). "The human gene encoding SCYB9B, a putative novel CXC chemokine, maps to human chromosome 4q21 like the closely related genes for MIG (SCYB9) and INP10 (SCYB10)". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 81 (3–4): 271–2.  
  6. ^ O'Donovan N, Galvin M, Morgan JG (1999). "Physical mapping of the CXC chemokine locus on human chromosome 4". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 84 (1–2): 39–42.  

References

Further reading

  • Rani MR, Foster GR, Leung S, et al. (1996). "Characterization of beta-R1, a gene that is selectively induced by interferon beta (IFN-beta) compared with IFN-alpha". J. Biol. Chem. 271 (37): 22878–84.  
  • Jacobs KA, Collins-Racie LA, Colbert M, et al. (1997). "A genetic selection for isolating cDNAs encoding secreted proteins". Gene 198 (1–2): 289–96.  
  • Cole KE, Strick CA, Paradis TJ, et al. (1998). "Interferon–inducible T Cell Alpha Chemoattractant (I-TAC): A Novel Non-ELR CXC Chemokine with Potent Activity on Activated T Cells through Selective High Affinity Binding to CXCR3". J. Exp. Med. 187 (12): 2009–21.  
  • Erdel M, Laich A, Utermann G, et al. (1998). "The human gene encoding SCYB9B, a putative novel CXC chemokine, maps to human chromosome 4q21 like the closely related genes for MIG (SCYB9) and INP10 (SCYB10)". Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 81 (3–4): 271–2.  
  • Luo Y, Kim R, Gabuzda D, et al. (1999). "The CXC-chemokine, H174: expression in the central nervous system". J. Neurovirol. 4 (6): 575–85.  
  • Tensen CP, Flier J, Van Der Raaij-Helmer EM, et al. (1999). "Human IP-9: A keratinocyte-derived high affinity CXC-chemokine ligand for the IP-10/Mig receptor (CXCR3)". J. Invest. Dermatol. 112 (5): 716–22.  
  • Laich A, Meyer M, Werner ER, Werner-Felmayer G (1999). "Structure and expression of the human small cytokine B subfamily member 11 (SCYB11/formerly SCYB9B, alias I-TAC) gene cloned from IFN-gamma-treated human monocytes (THP-1)". J. Interferon Cytokine Res. 19 (5): 505–13.  
  • Tensen CP, Flier J, Rampersad SS, et al. (1999). "Genomic organization, sequence and transcriptional regulation of the human CXCL 11(1) gene". Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1446 (1–2): 167–72.  
  • Loetscher P, Pellegrino A, Gong JH, et al. (2001). "The ligands of CXC chemokine receptor 3, I-TAC, Mig, and IP10, are natural antagonists for CCR3". J. Biol. Chem. 276 (5): 2986–91.  
  • Lambeir AM, Proost P, Durinx C, et al. (2001). "Kinetic investigation of chemokine truncation by CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase IV reveals a striking selectivity within the chemokine family". J. Biol. Chem. 276 (32): 29839–45.  
  • Hensbergen PJ, van der Raaij-Helmer EM, Dijkman R, et al. (2001). "Processing of natural and recombinant CXCR3-targeting chemokines and implications for biological activity". Eur. J. Biochem. 268 (18): 4992–9.  
  • Mohan K, Ding Z, Hanly J, Issekutz TB (2002). "IFN-gamma-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant is a potent stimulator of normal human blood T lymphocyte transendothelial migration: differential regulation by IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha". J. Immunol. 168 (12): 6420–8.  
  • Basu S, Schaefer TM, Ghosh M, et al. (2003). "Molecular cloning and sequencing of 25 different rhesus macaque chemokine cDNAs reveals evolutionary conservation among C, CC, CXC, AND CX3C families of chemokines". Cytokine 18 (3): 140–8.  
  • Salmaggi A, Gelati M, Dufour A, et al. (2003). "Expression and modulation of IFN-gamma-inducible chemokines (IP-10, Mig, and I-TAC) in human brain endothelium and astrocytes: possible relevance for the immune invasion of the central nervous system and the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis". J. Interferon Cytokine Res. 22 (6): 631–40.  
  • Rani MR, Hibbert L, Sizemore N, et al. (2002). "Requirement of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Akt for interferon-beta-mediated induction of the beta-R1 (SCYB11) gene". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (41): 38456–61.  
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903.  
  • Kao J, Kobashigawa J, Fishbein MC, et al. (2003). "Elevated serum levels of the CXCR3 chemokine ITAC are associated with the development of transplant coronary artery disease". Circulation 107 (15): 1958–61.  
  • Satish L, Yager D, Wells A (2003). "Glu-Leu-Arg-negative CXC chemokine interferon gamma inducible protein-9 as a mediator of epidermal-dermal communication during wound repair". J. Invest. Dermatol. 120 (6): 1110–7.  
  • Klunker S, Trautmann A, Akdis M, et al. (2003). "A second step of chemotaxis after transendothelial migration: keratinocytes undergoing apoptosis release IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10, monokine induced by IFN-gamma, and IFN-gamma-inducible alpha-chemoattractant for T cell chemotaxis toward epidermis in atopic dermatitis". J. Immunol. 171 (2): 1078–84.  
  • Xanthou G, Duchesnes CE, Williams TJ, Pease JE (2003). "CCR3 functional responses are regulated by both CXCR3 and its ligands CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11". Eur. J. Immunol. 33 (8): 2241–50.  


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