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Cayman Islands–United States relations

Cayman Islands – United States relations
Map indicating locations of Cayman Islands and USA

Cayman Islands

United States

Cayman Islands – United States relations are bilateral relations between the Cayman Islands and the United States.

Overview

Although the United Kingdom is responsible for the Cayman Islands' defense and external affairs, important bilateral issues are often resolved by negotiations between the Cayman Government and foreign governments, including the United States. Despite close historic and political links to the U.K. and Jamaica, geography and the rise of tourism and international finance in the Cayman Islands' economy has made the United States its most important foreign economic partner. Following a decline in tourists from the United States after the September 11, 2001 attacks, over 200,000 U.S. citizens traveled by air to the Cayman Islands in 2004; 4,761 Americans were resident there as of 2005.

For U.S. and other foreign investors and businesses, the Cayman Islands' main appeal as a financial center is the absence of all major direct taxes, free capital movement, minimal government regulations, and a well-developed financial infrastructure.

With the rise in international money laundering. The country's swift response in enacting laws limiting banking secrecy, introducing requirements for customer identification and record keeping, and for banks to cooperate with foreign investigators led to its removal from the list of non-cooperative territories in June 2001.

U.S. representation

The United States does not maintain diplomatic offices in the Cayman Islands. Diplomatic relations are conducted through the U.S. Embassy in London and the British Embassy in Washington, D.C.

The Cayman Islands are, however, part of the Grand Cayman to assist in providing services for American citizens.

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Department of State (Background Notes).[1]

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