World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Cerulean Blue

Article Id: WHEBN0009149063
Reproduction Date:

Title: Cerulean Blue  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Delta Delta Delta, List of inorganic pigments
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Cerulean Blue

For other uses, see Cerulean (disambiguation).
Cerulean
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #007BA7
sRGBB  (rgb) (0, 123, 167)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (100, 26, 0, 35)
HSV       (h, s, v) (196°, 100%, 65%)
Source Encycolorpedia,[1] Maerz and Paul[2]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Cerulean, also spelled caerulean, is a color term that may be applied to certain colors with the hue ranging roughly between blue and cyan, overlapping with both. It also largely overlaps with azure and sky blue, although cerulean is dimmer. The specific color #007BA7 is also known as "Celadon blue".[1]

The first recorded use of cerulean as a color name in English was in 1590.[3] The word is probably derived from the Latin word caeruleus, "dark blue, blue or blue-green", which in turn probably derives from caelulum, diminutive of caelum, "heaven, sky".[4]

Use in artistic painting


In classical times, cerulean was used to describe blue pigments, particularly mixtures of copper and cobaltous oxides. These early attempts to create sky blue colors were often less than satisfactory due to greenish hues and lack of permanence. When the pigment cerulean blue (shown in the color box to the right) was invented, it largely superseded all these prior pigments. See also Tekhelet.

Cerulean blue

Cerulean Blue
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #2A52BE
sRGBB  (rgb) (42, 82, 190)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (87, 74, 0, 0)
HSV       (h, s, v) (224°, 78%, 75%)
Source [5]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the color cerulean blue.

The first recorded use of cerulean blue as a color name in English was in 1859.[6]

Pigments through the ages shows a "Painted swatch of cerulean blue" that is representative of the actual cobalt stannate pigment. This color swatch matches the color shown in the color box at right.[7]

Cerulean blue pigment

Discovered in 1805 by Andreas Höpfner, the pigment originally referred to as cerulean blue (or corruleum blue) was first marketed in 1860 as "coeruleum" by George Rowney of the United Kingdom. The primary chemical constituent of the pigment is cobalt(II) stannate.[8][9][10]

It is particularly valuable for artistic painting of skies because of the purity of the blue (specifically the lack of greenish hues), its permanence (no other blue pigments retained color as well), and its opaqueness.[11]

Today, cobalt chromate is sometimes marketed under the cerulean blue name but is darker and greener (Rex Art color index PB 36) than the cobalt stannate version (color index PB 35). The chromate makes excellent turquoise colors and is identified by Rex Art and some other manufacturers as "cobalt turquoise".[12][13]

Other variations of cerulean

Pale cerulean

Cerulean (Pantone)
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #98B4D4
sRGBB  (rgb) (152, 180, 212)
HSV       (h, s, v) (212°, 28%, 83%)
Source
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Pantone, in a press release, declared the pale tone of cerulean at right, which they call cerulean, as the "color of the millennium".[15]

The source of this color is the "Pantone Textile Paper eXtended (TPX)" color list, color #15-4020 TPX—Cerulean.[16]

Bright cerulean

Cerulean (Crayola)
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #1DACD6
sRGBB  (rgb) (29, 172, 214)
HSV       (h, s, v) (209°, 94%, 49%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

This bright tone of cerulean is the color called cerulean by Crayola crayons.

Cerulean frost

Cerulean Frost
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #6D9BC3
sRGBB  (rgb) (109, 155, 195)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (44, 21, 0, 24)
HSV       (h, s, v) (208°, 44%, 77[17]%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the color cerulean frost.

Cerulean frost is one of the colors in the special set of metallic colored Crayola crayons called Silver Swirls, the colors of which were formulated by Crayola in 1990.

Dark cerulean

Dark cerulean
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #08457E
sRGBB  (rgb) (8, 69, 126)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (94, 45, 0, 51)
HSV       (h, s, v) (209°, 94%, 49%)
Source Encycolorpedia
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Cerulean in nature

Cerulean in human culture

Color
  • Cerulean was nominated by Pantone in 1999 as the "color of the millennium."[18] (See the color pale cerulean above)
Computer software
Film
  • In The Devil Wears Prada, Miranda Priesly (Meryl Streep) makes a reference to a cerulean colored sweater, and other high fashion clothes items in Cerulean.
Literature
Music
  • Cerulean is the album title for the September 10, 1991 music release by the band The Ocean Blue.
  • Cerulean is the first album by musician Baths
  • Cerulean is the sixth track on the 1992 album Hoodoo Zephyr by composer John Adams.
Science
Television
  • Repetition of the words "cerulean blue" is a method the "Pusher" villain uses at the beginning of the eponymous X-Files episode 17 season 3 in order to lull his victims to do what he wants.
Video games
  • Azul the Cerulean is the blue-haired 33 year-old final recruit of the Tsviets in Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII.
  • Cerulean City is one of the pivotal locations in the game and anime Pokémon and is home to the Water Pokémon Gym in Kanto.
  • 1986 game Milesland's Finest had a faction named the Cerulean Army.

See also

References

External links

  • A page on Cerulean Blue
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.