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Chicago Maroons

Chicago Maroons
Logo
University University of Chicago
Conference University Athletic Association
Southern Athletic Association
NCAA Division III
Athletic director Tom Weingartner
Location Chicago, IL
Football stadium Stagg Field
Basketball arena Ratner Athletics Center
Other arenas Henry Crown Field House
Mascot Phoenix
Nickname Maroons
Fight song Wave the Flag
Colors
     Maroon[1]       White
Website .edu.uchicagoathletics

The Maroons are the intercollegiate sports teams of the University of Chicago. They are named after the color maroon. They compete in the NCAA's Division III. They are primarily members of the University Athletic Association and were co-founders of the Big Ten Conference in 1895 and members until 1946. The school was part of the Midwest Collegiate Athletic Conference from 1976 to 1987. The team colors are maroon and white, and the Phoenix is their mascot. Stagg Field is the home stadium for the football team.

Contents

  • Men's athletics 1
  • Women's athletics 2
  • Big Ten Conference 3
  • Championships 4
    • National and NCAA championships 4.1
    • University Athletic Association championships 4.2
    • Midwest Collegiate Athletic Conference championships 4.3
    • Big Ten Conference championships 4.4
  • Fight song 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Men's athletics

Women's athletics

Big Ten Conference

The Maroons helped establish the Big Ten Conference (then known as the Intercollegiate Conference of Faculty Representatives, and commonly called the Western Conference) at a follow-up meeting on February 8, 1896.[2] The league initially consisted of Chicago, Purdue, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, and Northwestern. After several mostly-losing seasons, the football team was dropped following the 1939 season.[3]

On March 7, 1946 the University of Chicago withdrew from the Big Ten Conference.[4] On May 31, 1946 the resignation was formally accepted by the Big Ten Conference.[5]

Championships

National and NCAA championships

  • Kris Alden: 1989 Men's Swimming Individual Champion
  • Rhaina Echols: 1999 Women's Cross Country Individual Champion, 2000 Women's Indoor (3,000-meter run and 5,000-meter run) and 2000 Women's Outdoor Individual Track Champion (5,000-meter run)
  • Tom Haxton: 2004 Men's Outdoor Track & Field Individual Champion (10,000-meter run)
  • Adeoye Mabogunje: 2004 Men's Outdoor Track & Field Individual Champion (Triple Jump)
  • Peter Wang: 1991 & 1992 Wrestling Individual Champion

University Athletic Association championships

  • Men's Basketball: 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2007, 2008
  • Women's Basketball: 1989, 2008, 2011
  • Men's Cross Country: 2002, 2004
  • Women's Cross Country: 1993, 2012, 2013
  • Football: 1998, 2000, 2005, 2010
  • Men's Soccer: 2001, 2009
  • Women's Soccer: 1994, 1996, 1999, 2010
  • Softball: 1996
  • Men's Track & Field (Indoor): 2002, 2008
  • Women's Track & Field (Indoor): 2008, 2010, 2014
  • Wrestling: 1989, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011
  • Women's Tennis: 2010, 2012

Midwest Collegiate Athletic Conference championships

  • Men's Soccer: 1978
  • Men's Tennis: 1984
  • Women's Tennis: 1983
  • Men's Track & Field (Indoor): 1980
  • Women's Track & Field (Outdoor): 1983, 1984

Big Ten Conference championships

  • Baseball: 1896, 1897, 1898, 1899, 1913
  • Men's Basketball: 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1920, 1924
  • Men's Fencing: 1927-28, 1933–34, 1935–36, 1936–37, 1937–38, 1938–39, 1939–40, 1940–41
  • Football: 1899, 1905, 1907, 1908, 1913, 1922, 1924
  • Men's Golf: 1922, 1924, 1926
  • Men's Gymnastics: 1909, 1914, 1917, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1924, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1930, 1931, 1932,1933, 1934
  • Men's Swimming: 1916, 1919, 1921
  • Men's Tennis: 1910, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1918, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1938, 1939
  • Men's Track & Field (Indoor): 1911, 1915, 1917
  • Men's Track & Field (Outdoor): 1905, 1908, 1917
Source
[6]

Fight song

Wave the Flag (For Old Chicago) is the fight song for the Maroons.[7] Gordon Erickson wrote the lyrics in 1929. The tune was adapted from Miami University's "Marching Song" written in 1908 by Raymond H. Burke, a University of Chicago graduate who joined Miami's faculty in 1906.

The song is traditionally sung by the players at midfield after all home victories.[8]

Wave the flag of old Chicago,
Maroon the color grand.
Ever shall her team be victors
Known throughout the land.
With the grand old man to lead them,
Without a peer they'll stand.
Wave again the dear old banner,
For they're heroes ev'ry man.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Color Palette | University Communications". Communications.uchicago.edu. Retrieved 2015-09-24. 
  2. ^ Canham, Don (1996). From The Inside: A Half Century of Michigan Athletics. Olympia Sports Press. p. 281.  
  3. ^ "Chicago gives up football as major sport". Gettysburg Times. December 22, 1939. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  4. ^ "Chicago Withdraws From Big Ten Because of Weak Athletic Teams". New York Times. March 8, 1946. Retrieved 22 April 2012. 
  5. ^ "No changes voted by Big Ten group". Champaign, Illinois: New York Times. June 1, 1946. Retrieved 22 April 2012. 
  6. ^ http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/big10/genrel/auto_pdf/2012-13/misc_non_event/b1gupdatedrecordsbookfront.pdf
  7. ^ [2]
  8. ^ "Chicago Traditions" at University of Chicago official website (accessed 2012-12-29).

External links

  • Official website
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