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Chief Minister of Karnataka

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Title: Chief Minister of Karnataka  
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Subject: August 12, December 26, Rajkumar (actor), Raj Bhavan (Karnataka), Neelam Sanjiva Reddy, Sudha Murthy, S. M. Krishna, N. Dharam Singh, Siddaramaiah, History of the Republic of India
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Chief Minister of Karnataka

Template:Infobox political post

The Chief Minister of Karnataka, a south Indian state, is the head of the Government of Karnataka. As per the Constitution of India, the Governor of Karnataka is the state's de jure head, but de facto executive authority rests with the chief minister. Following elections to the Karnataka Legislative Assembly, the governor usually invites the party (or coalition) with a majority of seats to form the government. The governor appoints the chief minister, whose council of ministers are collectively responsible to the assembly. Given that he has the confidence of the assembly, the chief minister's term is for five years and is subject to no term limits.[1]

Since 1947, twenty-two people have been Chief Minister of Mysore (as the state was known before 1 November 1973) and Karnataka. A majority of them belonged to the Indian National Congress party, including inaugural office-holder K. Chengalaraya Reddy. The longest-serving chief minister, D. Devaraj Urs, held the office for over seven years in the 1970s. As a Janata Party member, Ramakrishna Hegde served the most number of discontinuous terms (three), while the Congress's Veerendra Patil had the largest gap between two terms (over eighteen years). One chief minister, H. D. Deve Gowda, went on to become the 11th Prime Minister of India, while another, B. D. Jatti, served as the country's fifth Vice President. There have been six instances of President's rule in Karnataka, most recently in 2007–08.

The incumbent chief minister is Siddaramaiah of the Congress, who was sworn in on 13 May 2013.

Chief Ministers of Mysore and Karnataka





No Name Term[2]
(tenure length)
Assembly[3]
(election)
PartyTemplate:Efn
Chief Minister of Mysore
1 K. Chengalaraya Reddy 25 October 1947 – 30 March 1952
(4 years, 157 days)
Elected un oppositely being a terrific freedom fighter without assembly election from[1947-1952] Indian National Congress
2 K. Hanumanthaiah 30 March 1952 – 19 August 1956
(4 years, 142 days)
First Assembly (1952–57)
(1951/52 election)
continued...
3 Kadidal Manjappa 19 August 1956 – 31 October 1956
(0 years, 73 days)
Chief Minister of Mysore (following reorganisation of states)
4 S. Nijalingappa 1 November 1956 – 16 May 1958
(1 year, 197 days)
...continued
First Assembly (1952–57)
(1951/52 election)
Indian National Congress
Second Assembly (1957–62)
(1957 election)
5 B. D. Jatti 16 May 1958 – 9 March 1962
(3 years, 297 days)
6 S. R. Kanthi 14 March 1962 – 20 June 1962
(0 years, 98 days)
Third Assembly (1962–67)
(1962 election)
(4) S. Nijalingappa 21 June 1962 – 28 May 1968
(5 years, 342 days)
Forth Assembly (1967–71)
(1967 election)
7 Veerendra Patil 29 May 1968 – 18 March 1971
(2 years, 293 days)
VacantTemplate:Efn
(President's rule)
19 March 1971 – 20 March 1972
(1 year, 1 day)
Dissolved N/A
Chief Minister of Karnataka
8 D. Devaraj Urs 20 March 1972 – 31 December 1977
(5 years, 286 days)
Fifth Assembly (1972–77)
(1972 election)
Indian National Congress
VacantTemplate:Efn
(President's rule)
31 December 1977 – 28 February 1978
(0 years, 59 days)
Dissolved N/A
(8) D. Devaraj Urs 28 February 1978 – 7 January 1980
(1 year, 313 days)
Sixth Assembly (1978–83)
(1978 election)
Indian National Congress
9 R. Gundu Rao 12 January 1980 – 6 January 1983
(2 years, 359 days)
10 Ramakrishna Hegde 10 January 1983 – 29 December 1984Template:Efn
(1 year, 354 days)
Seventh Assembly (1983–85)
(1983 election)
Janata Party
8 March 1985 – 13 February 1986Template:Efn
(0 years, 342 days)
Eighth Assembly (1985–89)
(1985 election)
16 February 1986 – 10 August 1988
(2 years, 176 days)
11 S. R. Bommai 13 August 1988 – 21 April 1989
(0 years, 281 days)
VacantTemplate:Efn
(President's rule)
21 April 1989 – 30 November 1989
(0 years, 193 days)
Dissolved N/A
(7) Veerendra Patil 30 November 1989 – 10 October 1990
(0 years, 314 days)
Ninth Assembly (1989–94)
(1989 election)
Indian National Congress
VacantTemplate:Efn
(President's rule)
10 October 1990 – 17 October 1990
(0 years, 7 days)
N/A
12 S. Bangarappa 17 October 1990 – 19 November 1992
(2 years, 33 days)
Indian National Congress
13 M. Veerappa Moily 19 November 1992 – 11 December 1994
(2 years, 22 days)
14 H. D. Deve Gowda 11 December 1994 – 31 May 1996
(1 year, 172 days)
Tenth Assembly (1994–99)
(1994 election)
Janata Dal
15 J. H. Patel 31 May 1996 – 7 October 1999
(3 years, 129 days)
16 S. M. Krishna 11 October 1999 – 28 May 2004
(4 years, 230 days)
Eleventh Assembly (1999–2004)
(1999 election)
Indian National Congress
17 Dharam Singh 28 May 2004 – 28 January 2006
(1 year, 245 days)
Twelfth Assembly (2004–07)
(2004 election)
18 H. D. Kumaraswamy 3 February 2006 – 8 October 2007
(1 year, 253 days)
Janata Dal (Secular)
VacantTemplate:Efn
(President's rule)
9 October 2007 – 11 November 2007
(0 years, 33 days)
N/A
19 B. S. Yeddyurappa 12 November 2007 – 19 November 2007
(0 years, 7 days)
Bharatiya Janata Party
VacantTemplate:Efn
(President's rule)
20 November 2007 – 27 May 2008
(0 years, 189 days)
Dissolved N/A
(19) B. S. Yeddyurappa 30 May 2008 – 31 July 2011
(3 years, 62 days)
Thirteenth Assembly (2008–13)
(2008 election)
Bharatiya Janata Party
20 D. V. Sadananda Gowda 4 August 2011 – 12 July 2012
(0 years, 343 days)
21 Jagadish Shettar 12 July 2012 – 12 May 2013
(0 years, 304 days)
22 Siddaramaiah 13 May 2013 – present
(1 year, 39 days)
Fourteenth Assembly (2013–18)
(2013 election)
Indian National Congress

Template:Notelist

See also

References

Template:Chief Ministers of Indian States
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