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Chienlit

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Chienlit

La Chienlit c'est lui from the student protests in Paris during May 1968

Chienlit is a traditional French term typically translated as masquerade (French: Mascarade) or carnival/chaos. It was brought to notoriety by General Charles de Gaulle in an angry speech during the student protests in Paris during May 1968 in France, when he used the vernacular term as a scatological pun "La réforme oui, la chie-en-lit non" meaning Reform yes, but chaos - no whilst the pun was Reform - yes, shit in bed - no .

The term is now common parlance in French political commentary, used both critically and ironically referring back to de Gaulle.

Contents

  • Origins 1
  • Charles de Gaulle 2
  • Chien lit - Dog bed 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • Bibliography 6
  • External links 7

Origins

First written appearance of the word Chienlictz in Gargantua.
.

The blurred etymological origin of chie-en-lit / chienlit was the medieval carnival/masquerade[1] when peasants and artisans had one day per year to celebrate, to abandon all work and chores, to abandon contemporary mores and conventions, to shit in bed. Somebody would be chosen as king for a day, and even the lord of the manor sometimes joined in, enduring ritual humiliation, such as being led through the streets like a servant, or slave, or dog.

The first known appearance of the term is in the 16th century novel The Life of Gargantua and of Pantagruel by François Rabelais.[2] and it was used by Émile Zola in both Nana (1880),[3] and L'Assommoir (1887).[4]

Charles de Gaulle

'Chienlit' was brought to notoriety by General La chienlit, c'est lui ! - the chienlit, it is him!" and "La chienlit, c'est encore lui ! - it is still him!".[5]

The term is now common parlance in French political commentary, used both critically and ironically referring back to de Gaulle.

Chien lit - Dog bed

De Gaulle's use of obscure vernacular profanity in a major speech was initially mistranslated by The Guardian and the English press corps as chien lit - dog bed, alluding to a chaotic, dishevelled, malodorous, flea pit, as in the English expression 'a dog's breakfast'.

See also

References

  1. ^ Académie française, , page 313Dictionnaire de l'Académie française, Paris, Firmin Didot frères, 1835. OCLC 2147157
  2. ^ , P. 203Faits et dits du géant Gargantua et de son fils Pantagruel.
  3. ^ , p. 21Nana
  4. ^ , p. 398L'Assomoir.
  5. ^ La Chienlit c'est luiSlogans of Mai '68. Image of the original 'poster-graphic' of General Charles de Gaulle -

Bibliography

  • François Caradec, La Chienlit de papa, Paris, A. Michel, 1968. OCLC 10218820
  • Siné, La Chienlit : c'est moi !, Paris : Balland, 1978. OCLC 10798655
  • Dominique Venner, La chienlit : petit guide de la contestation en politique, à l'université, au théâtre, au cinéma, dans la chanson, dans l'église; etc., Paris, 1969. OCLC 69179217
  • Jean-Jaques Lebel, La chienlit Dokumente zur französischen Mai-Revolte, Darmstadt Melzer 1969. OCLC 174305937

External links

  • La Chienlit c'est luiSlogans of Mai '68. Image of the original 'poster-graphic' of General Charles de Gaulle -
  • La Chienlit c'est luiImage of the original 'poster-graphic' of General Charles de Gaulle -
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