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Choux pastry

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Title: Choux pastry  
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Subject: List of pastries, Croquembouche, Chouquette, Gougère, Pommes dauphine
Collection: Doughs, French Pastries, Pastries
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Choux pastry

Choux Pastry
Choux pastry swans
Alternative names Pâte à choux
Type Pastry
Place of origin France
Creator Panterelli
Main ingredients butter, flour, eggs, water
Cookbook: Choux Pastry 

Choux pastry, or pâte à choux (pronounced: ), is a light pastry dough used to make profiteroles, croquembouches, éclairs, French crullers, beignets, St. Honoré cake, quenelles, Parisian gnocchi, dumplings and gougères. It contains only butter, water, flour, and eggs. Instead of a raising agent, it employs high moisture content to create steam during cooking to puff the pastry. The pastry is used in many European and European-derived cuisines.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Essential ingredients and manner of rising 2
  • Foods made with choux pastry 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

History

According to some cookbooks,[1] a chef by the name of Pantarelli or Pantanelli invented the dough in 1540, seven years after he left Florence with Catherine de' Medici and her court. He used the dough to make a gâteau and named it pâte à Pantanelli. Over time, the recipe of the dough evolved, and the name changed to pâte à popelin, which was used to make popelins, small cakes made in the shape of a woman's breasts. Then, Avice, a pâtissier in the eighteenth century, created what were then called choux buns. The name of the dough changed to pâte à choux, as Avice's buns resembled cabbages—choux in French.

From there, Antoine Carême made modifications to the recipe, resulting in the recipe most commonly used now for profiteroles.[2]

Essential ingredients and manner of rising

The ingredients for choux pastry are butter, water, flour, and eggs. Like Yorkshire Pudding or David Eyre's pancake, instead of a raising agent, it employs high moisture content to create steam during cooking to puff the pastry.

Foods made with choux pastry

This pastry is used to used to make profiteroles, croquembouches, éclairs, French crullers, beignets, St. Honoré cake, quenelles, Parisian gnocchi, dumplings,[3] and gougères.

Choux pastry is usually baked but for beignets it is fried. In Spain and Latin America, churros are made of fried choux pastry, sugared and dipped in a thin chocolate blancmange for breakfast. In Austrian cuisine, it is also boiled to make Marillenknödel, a sweet apricot dumpling; in that case it does not puff, but remains relatively dense. They are sometimes filled with cream and used to make cream puffs or éclairs.[4]


See also

References

  1. ^ the chefs of Le Cordon Bleu (2011). Le Cordon Bleu patisserie foundations. Clifton Park, N.Y.: Delmar.  
  2. ^ Juillet, Claude (1998). Classic Patisserie: An A–Z Handbook. Butterworth-Heinemann.  
  3. ^ Henri-Paul Pellaprat, Jeremiah Tower, The Great Book of French Cuisine, 2012
  4. ^ "Basics: Choux pastry". Just Hungry. 2004-04-06. Retrieved 2010-09-08. 

External links

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