Climate of miami

Miami
Climate chart (explanation)
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
2
 
75
59
 
 
2.1
 
77
60
 
 
2.4
 
79
64
 
 
2.9
 
82
68
 
 
6.2
 
85
72
 
 
9.3
 
88
75
 
 
5.7
 
89
76
 
 
7.6
 
89
77
 
 
7.6
 
88
76
 
 
5.6
 
85
72
 
 
2.7
 
80
67
 
 
1.8
 
77
62
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: WMO

Miami is classified as having a tropical monsoon climate (Köppen climate classification Am). Its sea-level elevation, coastal location, position just above the Tropic of Cancer, and proximity to the Gulf Stream shape its climate. With January averaging 67.2 °F (19.6 °C), winter features mild to warm temperatures; cool air usually settles after the passage of a cold front, which produces much of the little amount of below 50 °F (10 °C), but very rarely below 35 °F (2 °C). Highs generally range between 70–77 °F (21–25 °C). The wet season begins some time in May, ending in mid-October. During this period, temperatures are in the mid 80s to low 90s (29–35 °C), accompanied by high humidity, though the heat is often relieved by afternoon thunderstorms or a sea breeze that develops off the Atlantic Ocean, which then allow lower temperatures, but conditions still remain very muggy. Much of the year's 55.9 inches (1,420 mm) of rainfall occurs during this period.

A typical midsummer day does not have temperatures below 75 °F (24 °C). Temperatures in the high 80s to low 90s (30-35 °C) accompanied by high humidity are often relieved by afternoon thunderstorms or a sea breeze that develops off the Atlantic Ocean, which then allow lower temperatures, although conditions still remain very muggy. During winter, humidity is significantly lower, allowing for cooler weather to develop. Average minimum temperatures during that time are around 60 °F (15 °C), rarely dipping below 35 °F (2 °C), and the equivalent maxima usually range between 70 and 77 °F (19-24 °C).

Miami has recorded a triple-digit temperature only once; the highest temperature recorded was 100 °F (38 °C), on July 21, 1942.[1] The coldest temperature ever recorded in the city of Miami was 27 °F (-3 °C) on February 3, 1917. Miami has never recorded an accumulation of snow, and only once recorded flurries, on January 19, 1977. Weather conditions for the area around Miami were recorded sporadically from 1839 until 1900, with many years-long gaps. A cooperative temperature and rainfall recording site was established in what is now Downtown in December, 1900. An official Weather Bureau Office was opened in Miami in June, 1911.[2]

Miami receives abundant rainfall, one of the highest among major U.S. cities. Most of this rainfall occurs from mid-May through early October. It receives annual rainfall of 58.6 inches (1488 mm),[3] whereas nearby Fort Lauderdale and Miami Beach receive 63.8 in (1621 mm) and 48.3 in (1227 mm), respectively, which demonstrates the high local variability in rainfall rates.

Miami reports more Thunderstorms than most U S cities, with about eighty days per year having thunder reported. These storms are often strong, with frequent lightning and very heavy rain. Occasionally, they can be severe with damaging straight line winds and large hail. Tornadoes and Waterspouts sometimes occur, although violent tornadoes of the type seen in other parts of the U S are rare in Florida.

Hurricanes

The Atlantic Hurricane season officially runs from June 1 through November 30, although hurricanes can develop beyond those dates. The most likely time for Miami to be hit is during the peak of the Cape Verde season which is mid-August through the end of September.[4] Due to its location between two major bodies of water known for tropical activity, Miami is also statistically the most likely major city in the world to be struck by a hurricane, trailed closely by Nassau, Bahamas, and Havana, Cuba. Despite this, the city has been fortunate in not having a direct hit by a hurricane since Hurricane Cleo in 1964.[5] However, many other hurricanes have affected the city, namely the Great Miami Hurricane in 1926, Betsy in 1965, Andrew in 1992, Irene in 1999, and Hurricanes Katrina and Wilma in 2005. At least 35 direct and 26 indirect deaths in Florida were attributed to Wilma.

In addition, a tropical depression in October 2001 passed over the city, causing record rainfall and flooding. Locally, the storm is credited as the No Name Storm of 2000, though the depression went on to become Tropical Storm Leslie upon entering the Atlantic Ocean.

Hurricane, known as the "Great Miami Hurricane of 1926," caused catastrophic damage to the heavily developed Miami and Miami Beach area. Hurricane Betsy passed over Key Largo, south of the city, but did cause hurricane force winds and very heavy rainfall there. Hurricane Andrew in 1992 also struck south of city and caused extensive damage and flooding in the Homestead area suburbs. Hurricane Wilma in 2005 caused severe damage to many high-rise buildings in the downtown area as it broke many windows out, which in turn caused bad water damage on the insides of the buildings. It also caused at least 35 direct and 26 indirect fatalities in Florida.

Miami has been identified as one of three cities in the United States most vulnerable to hurricanes, mainly due to its location and it being surrounded by ocean and low-lying coastal plains, the other two cities being New Orleans and New York City.[6]


Climate data for Miami (MIA), 1981−2010 normals
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 88
(31)
89
(32)
93
(34)
96
(36)
96
(36)
98
(37)
100
(38)
98
(37)
97
(36)
95
(35)
91
(33)
89
(32)
100
(38)
Average high °F (°C) 76.1
(24.5)
77.9
(25.5)
80.1
(26.7)
83.1
(28.4)
86.7
(30.4)
89.2
(31.8)
90.6
(32.6)
90.7
(32.6)
89.0
(31.7)
85.9
(29.9)
81.5
(27.5)
77.7
(25.4)
84.0
(28.9)
Daily mean °F (°C) 67.9
(19.9)
70.0
(21.1)
72.4
(22.4)
75.6
(24.2)
79.7
(26.5)
82.5
(28.1)
83.9
(28.8)
84.0
(28.9)
82.7
(28.2)
79.6
(26.4)
74.7
(23.7)
70.3
(21.3)
76.9
(24.9)
Average low °F (°C) 59.8
(15.4)
62.1
(16.7)
64.7
(18.2)
68.1
(20.1)
72.6
(22.6)
75.8
(24.3)
77.1
(25.1)
77.2
(25.1)
76.3
(24.6)
73.3
(22.9)
67.9
(19.9)
62.8
(17.1)
69.8
(21)
Record low °F (°C) 28
(−2)
27
(−3)
32
(0)
39
(4)
50
(10)
60
(16)
66
(19)
67
(19)
62
(17)
51
(11)
36
(2)
30
(−1)
27
(−3)
Rainfall inches (mm) 1.61
(40.9)
2.25
(57.2)
3.00
(76.2)
3.14
(79.8)
5.38
(136.7)
9.66
(245.4)
6.50
(165.1)
8.88
(225.6)
9.86
(250.4)
6.33
(160.8)
3.26
(82.8)
2.04
(51.8)
61.91
(1,572.7)
Avg. rainy days (≥ 0.01 in) 6.9 6.5 7.0 6.4 10.0 16.4 16.9 18.9 17.9 12.7 8.4 7.2 135.2
Mean monthly sunshine hours 219.8 216.9 277.2 293.8 301.3 288.7 308.7 288.3 262.2 260.2 220.8 216.1 3,154
Source #1: NOAA (sun only, 1961–1990)[1][7]
Source #2: The Weather Channel (records) [8]


This chart shows the average coastal ocean water temperature by month in degrees Fahrenheit for Miami Beach based on historical measurements.[9]

January February March April 1-15 April 16-30 May 1-15 May 16-31 June 1-15 June 16-30 July 1-15 July 16-31 August 1-15 August 16-31 September 1-15 September 16-30 October 1-15 October 16-31 November December
71 73 75 78 78 80 81 84 85 86 86 86 84 84 83 83 79 76 73

References

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