World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Cobalt green

Article Id: WHEBN0005755334
Reproduction Date:

Title: Cobalt green  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Sven Rinman, Green, Cobalt, Zinc compounds, Inorganic pigments
Collection: Cobalt Compounds, Inorganic Pigments, Oxides, Zinc Compounds
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Cobalt green

Cobalt green
Properties
CoZnO2
Appearance green paste, linseed oil odor
Insoluble in water and most petroleum solvents
Hazards
Main hazards eye contact
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Cobalt green, sometimes known as Rinman's green or Zinc Green, is a translucent green pigment made by heating a mixture of cobalt(II) oxide and zinc oxide. Sven Rinman, a Swedish chemist, discovered this compound in 1780. Although it is stable and can be safely mixed with other pigments, it is rarely used because it is a weak pigment for its cost.

Some Cobalt Greens are derived from doping Co(II) into Mg(II) and Zn(II) sites of Mg2TiO4 and Zn2TiO4, respectively.[1]

Contents

  • Background 1
  • Research 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Background

  • Pigments through the Ages

External links

  1. ^ Völz, Hans G. et al. "Pigments, Inorganic" in Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry, 2006 Wiley-VCH, Weinheim. doi:10.1002/14356007.a20_243.pub2.
  2. ^ The Effect of cobalt oxide on zinc oxide in a new anticorrosive green pigment. Ahmed, Nivin, Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Vol. 0003-5599, Issue 0003-5599, pg. 0003.
  3. ^ Spectroscopic analysis of blue cobalt smalt pigment Jonynaite, D. Vibrational spectroscopy, Vol. 52, Issue 2, pg. 158, 2010
  4. ^ The Effect of cobalt oxide on zinc oxide in a new anticorrosive green pigment. Ahmed, Nivin, Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Vol. 0003-5599, Issue 0003-5599, pg. 0003.
  5. ^ http://www.webexhibits.org/pigments/indiv/overview/cogreen.html
  6. ^ Formation and the colour development in cobalt spinel pigments. Fernandez, Ana L. Journal of Pigment and resin technology, Vol. 31, Issue 6, pg. 350, 2002
  7. ^ Spectroscopic analysis of blue cobalt smalt pigment Jonynaite, D. Vibrational spectroscopy, Vol. 52, Issue 2, pg. 158, 2010
  8. ^ Effect of adding zinc on the properties of cobalt-containing ceramic pigments prepared from layered double hydroxides. Perez-Bernal, ME. Journal of Solid State Chemistry; Vol. 182, Issue 9, pg. 3566; 2009
  9. ^ Spectroscopic analysis of blue cobalt smalt pigment Jonynaite, D. Vibrational spectroscopy, Vol. 52, Issue 2, pg. 158, 2010
  10. ^ Investigation of Historical Analogues and Sol-Gel preparation of novel Inorganic cobalt-based pigments. Barkauskas, Jurgis, Lithuanian Academic Libraries Network (LABT) Vilnius University 2011-02-22
  11. ^ Green Pigment Spins Chip Promise. August 2006, news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/4776479.stm

References

See also

Cobalt Green has been tested for use in “spintronic” devices. Cobalt green is attractive in this application because it is magnetic at room temperature.[11]

Research

Color is an important characteristic of many ceramic products.[6] Pigments with cobalt-based ceramics are generally used for colored glazes in the ceramic industries for floor or wall whitewares.[7] Ceramic pigments are considered to be inorganic crystalline structures that develop a stable color.[8] They have a high resistance with respect to light, environment, and high temperature chemicals. The broad horizon of their colors is quite large: green, blue, violet, yellow, black and brown.[9] Synthetic approaches such as sol-gel technology, solution combustion method, polymeric precursor method, and so on are using cobalt-based pigments more recently.[10]

[5] Unfortunately, the pigment was never an artist’s favorite, as it has poor tinting and covering strength. However it has excellent lightfastness (due to its high zinc content) and its transparency makes it ideal for glazing.[4]

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.