Cobrador Island

Romblon
Municipality

Romblon town and Romblon Bay

Map of Romblon with Romblon highlighted
Romblon
Romblon
Location within the Philippines

Coordinates: 12°34′N 122°16′E / 12.567°N 122.267°E / 12.567; 122.267Coordinates: 12°34′N 122°16′E / 12.567°N 122.267°E / 12.567; 122.267

Country Philippines
Region MIMAROPA (Region IV-B)
Province Romblon
District Lone district
Founded 1571 (as encomienda)
  1631 (as pueblo)
Barangays 31
Government[1]
 • Mayor Gerard S. Montojo
 • Vice Mayor Mariano M. Mateo
Area[2]
 • Total 86.87 km2 (33.54 sq mi)
Highest elevation[3] 444 m (1,457 ft)
Population (2010)[4]
 • Total 37,995
 • Density 440/km2 (1,100/sq mi)
Time zone PST (UTC+8)
Zip Code 5500
Dialing code 42

Romblon is a third class municipality in the province of Romblon, Philippines. It is the capital of Romblon province. At the 2010 census, it had a population of 37,995 persons.[4][5]

Romblomanon or Ini is the native language of its inhabitants.

Geography

The municipality consists primarily of Romblon Island, as well as the smaller Alad, Cobrador, and Logbon Islands. The municipality is situated along the coast of Romblon Bay, a natural harbor and safe haven for ships passing in the area during inclement weather. The highest peak is Mount Lagting in barangay Sablayan with a height of 444 metres (1,457 ft).[3]

Barangays

Romblon is politically subdivided into 31 barangays.[5]

  • Agbaluto
  • Agpanabat
  • Agbudia
  • Agnaga
  • Agnay
  • Agnipa
  • Agtongo
  • Alad
  • Bagacay
  • Cajimos
  • Calabogo
  • Capaclan
  • Ginablan
  • Guimpingan
  • Ilauran
  • Lamao
  • Li-o
  • Logbon
  • Lunas
  • Lonos
  • Macalas
  • Mapula
  • Cobrador (Naguso)
  • Palje
  • Barangay I (Pob.)
  • Barangay II (Pob.)
  • Barangay III (Pob.)
  • Barangay IV (Pob.)
  • Sablayan
  • Sawang
  • Tambac

History

Romblon Island, seat of the municipality of Romblon is one of the three major islands of Romblon province. The islands were first visited by Spanish conquistador Martin de Goiti in late 1569, and were thereafter organized by the Spanish into encomiendas. The encomienda of Donblon (Romblon), established on April 24, 1571, was granted to Don Gonzalo Riquel. In the first census done by Spanish navigator Don Miguel Lopez de Loarca in 1582, Romblon Island was shown to have 240 residents engaged in wax gathering.[6]

In 1631 during the term of Spanish Governor-General Juan Niño de Tabora, Pueblo de Romblon was established as a pueblo, making it one of the two oldest settlements or pueblos in the province, the other being Banton located in the north of the province.[6] It received its first Spanish missionaries in the 17th century. During the 17th and 18th centuries, it was often ravaged by Moros.

It was organized into a Comandancia (a province or district under military control[7]) by the Spanish in 1853. Civil government was established in the province in 1901.[8]

History of barangays

The first recorded census available so far under the Spanish administration showing breakdown of its barrios was in 1894 reporting a total of 23 existing barrios. There were two local political units identified as barrio on this census, these were barrios Alfonso XIII (now a sitio of Li-o) and Maria Cristina (renamed Sawang). Two additional barrios were added to its long list beginning 1868 when the former pueblo of Guinpuc-an (Carmen) in Tablas island was abolished and ceded two of its barrios of Majabangbaybay and Sogod to this town. Another two numbers had unspecific barrio category, these were Aglomiom and Agnaga, while the pueblo referred to in 1894 census was barrio Poblacion, the rest, 16 in numbers, were barrio haciendas with a combined population of 6,731 in 1894. In 1896, its population was not reported unlike the rest of other municipalities or pueblos/parishes in the province. Of the original 23 barrios reported in 1894, only a very slight change could be noted if compared to Romblon's present population done in year 2000, and also if compared to number of barangays created.


In 1901, nine new barrios were created under the American administration, but it also abolished three of its existing barrios. Abolished barrios were barrio Aglomiom which was merged to Sablayan due to its small population, the coastal barrio of Alfonso XIII which was annexed to upstream barrio of Li-o and the inland barrio of Cogon which was reorganized and split into five barrios of Tambac, Ilauran, Macalas, Lamao, and Agbaluto (referred to collectively as "TIMLA" barrios, from the initial letters). These were created from territory of former barrio Cogon. While the two barrios located in Tablas island of Majabangbaybay and Sogod were returned to Badajoz, abolished as independent barrios and attached as sitios of barrio Guinpuc-an (Carmen) in 1901. Agtongo was created into a separate barrio in 1916 taken from Cajimos, while in 1918, those engaged in maritime industry were counted separetly as a distinct barrio known as Embarcacion. However, in 1939 its population was annexed to barrio Poblacion or El Pueblo.

A monument located near the beach in Sawang displays a marble plaque commemorating the World War II landing of American liberation forces on March 11, 1945 and the subsequent liberation of Romblon on March 18.

The nine additional barrios of Romblon, beginning in 1901, were 1. Bagacay, taken from Lonos, 2. Mapula from territory of former barrio Maria Cristina, renamed Sawang also in 1901, 3. Calabogo, taken from Agnaga, and the five new "TIMLA" barrios. The last barrio to be created, 9. Agbudia was taken from Guimpingan in 1939.

The island barrio of Nagoso was renamed into Cobrador in 1960. In 1975, the urban barangay of Romblon Poblacion was split into four separate barangays, named simply Barangy 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Demographics

Barrio/Barangay
Name
Land Area
(Hectares)
1894 1896 1903 1918 1939 1948 1960 1970 1975 1980 1990 1995 2000 2007 [9] 2010 [4]
Poblacion (U)
(Pueblo)
800 2,353 3,382 3,466 3,680 3,342 4,120
Barangay 1 (U)
(Poblacion)
5.53 735 733 477 483 566 563 623
Barangay 2 (U)
(Poblacion)
35.58 1,209 1,246 1,288 1,548 1,577 1,540 1,243
Barangay 3 (U)
(Poblacion)
6.49 1,108 1,082 1,305 1,485 1,493 1,544 1,465
Barangay 4 (U)
(Poblacion)
11.40 977 1,126 1,308 1,373 1,205 1,173 1,273
Agbaluto 414.40 253 325 266 165 233 378 343 359 431 613 533 577 566
Agbudia 161.33 207 231 284 364 522 636 808 834 621 616 587
Aglomiom 89
Agnaga 416.95 140 261 253 494 430 538 630 547 661 764 712 945 872 863
Agnay 350.70 213 185 237 500 262 368 411 456 481 560 627 744 752 708
Agnipa 298.50 270 353 329 450 474 544 611 606 664 735 891 1,050 1,126 1,226
Agpanabat 257.30 220 361 313 465 452 551 643 724 707 856 904 861 870 898
Agtongo 613.80 171 305 279 346 524 550 673 850 1,088 1,429 1,495 1,427
Alad 328.76 291 332 343 481 535 715 1,063 1,157 1,368 1,818 1,938 2,179 2,224 1,692
Alfonso XIII [c] 248
Bagacay 278.30 261 160 554 266 476 1,032 987 1,125 1,464 2,014 2,080 2,136 2,410
Cajimos (U) 153.73 200 490 232 446 493 643 910 1,100 1,195 1,517 2,093 2,347 2,530 2,630
Calabogo (U) 912.17 322 297 402 324 490 561 575 598 687 749 871 864 939
Capaclan (U) 374.40 200 349 186 427 380 1,181 1,843 1,595 2,033 2,979 3,384 3,855 4,136 4,296
Cobrador (Naguso) 329.59 200 233 294 400 435 460 588 738 756 866 906 894 888 856
Cogon 643
Embarcacion 115
Ginablan 475.81 246 341 279 318 322 380 502 516 531 617 571 676 676 698
Guimpingan 423.20 280 309 300 273 211 366 506 514 588 587 882 875 763 684
Ilauran 1,086.60 491 395 472 393 581 697 810 802 1,143 1,463 1,450 1,576 1,607
Lamao 482.54 219 220 424 190 379 427 512 534 724 833 775 785 952
Li-o 815.60 310 292 381 501 442 607 733 835 844 1,253 1,187 1,451 1,451 1,275
Logbon 120.30 188 183 133 322 358 355 441 466 517 699 807 818 761 787
Lonos 398.50 697 281 275 402 378 561 824 820 912 1,267 1,487 1,618 1,722 1,666
Lunas 233.47 200 282 221 428 310 497 497 524 453 543 656 564 580 729
Macalas (U) 402.00 194 132 322 253 395 441 491 563 753 902 959 987 1,174
Majabangbaybay [a] 156
Mapula 274.30 219 173 234 221 363 414 468 442 523 529 606 624 645
Palje 458.60 167 179 138 220 182 295 322 353 374 441 607 562 568 615
Sablayan 654.72 350 735 621 740 511 849 1,071 1,096 1,102 1,397 1,349 1,532 1,506 1,481
Sawang [b] 346.50 415 370 338 475 463 567 826 771 779 900 868 946 1,064 1,357
Sogod [a] 164
Tambac 830.50 247 224 315 239 342 338 384 367 423 507 530 575 623
Total 14,516.14 6,731 [d] 10,095 10,467 14,309 12,879 16,708 21,717 22,489 24,251 29,983 34,290 36,612 37,544 37,995
Notes:
a 1 2 Barrios annexed to Romblon taken from former Pueblo Guinpuc-an (Carmen) in 1868
b 1 Formerly named Maria Cristina
c 1 Abolished in 1901 and annexed to Li-o
d 1 Population not mentioned
U Urban barangay

Local government

The following are the elected local government officials of Romblon, Romblon, for the term 2010-2013:

  • Mayor: Gerard S. Montojo
  • Vice-Mayor: Mariano M. Mateo
  • Councilors:
  • Mavourneen Giovanni Avon M. Romero
  • Mart Arthur L. Silverio
  • Orlando M. Magano
  • Maria Rhosarean S. Lim
  • Edler M. Robis
  • Francis R. Riano
  • Jerry M. Mallorca
  • Melben M. Mesana

Tourism

The capital town of Romblon is oozing with rich political and religious history as well as natural beauty. Some of the places worth visiting in the municipality include:

  • St. Joseph's Cathedral and Belfry: A campanile constructed between 1640 and 1726 and still contains the old copper bell. The oldest Roman Catholic Church is located in Poblacion, Romblon. A product of every talented artisans that was built by Recollect Fathers out of coral blocks and bricks in the 15th century, it is a structure embellished with rich architectural details.
  • Bishop's Palace or Villa del Mar: Found in Barangay Lonos and serves as the official residence of the Bishop of Romblon. It was constructed out of clay bricks by the first Bishop of Romblon. Msgr. Nocolas Mondejar
  • Talipasak Beach Resort: It is located at Barangay Ginablan 13 kilometers from town and offers a quite and restful place for tourists. Activities include swimming, snorkeling, beach combing and island hopping.
  • Tiamban Beach: Located at Barangay Lonos and about five kilometers from the town proper the beach stretches to about 50 meters, its shoreline is covered with fine white sand.
  • Forts San Andres and Santiago: Twin Spanish forts constructed out of coral blocks and bricks between 1644 and 1573, which overlook the whole town and harbor at 156 ft. above sea level. These served as a bastion to protect the people against Moro raiders and Dutch pirates.
  • Marble Beach Resort: It is located in Barangay Ginablan and is a perfect spot for nature lovers.
  • Bonbon Beach: Located at Barangay Lonos. five kilometers away from town proper of Romblon, this shoreline is covered with fine white sand and features a gradually sloping ocean floor free of sea grass and sharp stones.
  • Nagoso Cave: Located in Brgy. Cobrador, it is the largest natural cave in the islands and believed to be an ancient burial ground as manifested by the present of pottery and ancient works of arts.
  • Cobrador Beach: Barangay Cobrador's treasure are its beaches. This is located in the eastern side of the islet and has fine white sand and crushed corrals.
  • Romblon Harbor: It offers a perfect shelter for sea vessels since Spanish times. Lying off the bay is a sunken galleon and the wreck of a Japanese battleship.
  • Marble Quarries and Factories: Anyone who is interested in how Romblon Marble is processed can take a tricycle in town and this will bring him/her to the marble quarries and factories. Romblon's marble can be compared to Italy's Carara because marble comes in a spectrum of shades ranging from white to black with a gamut of in-between tints like mottled white, tiger white, onyx and jade.

References

External links

  • Philippine Standard Geographic Code
  • Philippine Census Information
  • Local Governance Performance Management System
  • Tourist Attractions - Romblon, Romblon Provincial Government of Romblon website. Retrieved on 1 April 2013


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