World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Coming Back to Life

Article Id: WHEBN0004123303
Reproduction Date:

Title: Coming Back to Life  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Pulse (1995 film), Cluster One, Wearing the Inside Out, What Do You Want from Me (Pink Floyd song), Take It Back
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Coming Back to Life

"Coming Back to Life" is a song from Pink Floyd's 1994 album The Division Bell, and is credited solely to David Gilmour.

Composition

Gilmour has said (as can be heard on the David Gilmour in Concert DVD) that the song was written about his wife, Polly Samson.

The song is played in C major. It opens with a synth droning a C major chord, leading to a slow guitar solo played with a clean sound. The first verse is then sung slowly over synth chords, before the main rhythm of the song appears, and the rest of the band join the arrangement. Another verse is sung, and followed by a guitar solo. After this guitar solo, the last few lines of the verse are sung again, and then a guitar solo is played until the end of the song.

Personnel

with:

Live performances

The song has been a staple in Gilmour's performances from 1994-2006. It was featured at every show during the 1994 Division Bell Tour, at every one of Gilmour's semi-acoustic shows in 2001 and 2002, at Gilmour's performance at the Fender Stratocaster 50th anniversary concert in London in 2004, and was played at most shows during his solo 2006 On an Island Tour. It has currently been played at a handful of shows only during the current 2015-16 [[Rattle

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.