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Compact Macintosh

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Title: Compact Macintosh  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Timeline of Apple Inc. products, Macintosh SE, Macintosh Plus, Apple Paladin, Apple Interactive Television Box
Collection: 68K MacIntosh Computers, Compact MacIntosh, MacIntosh Case Designs
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Compact Macintosh

The Macintosh 128K introduced the Compact Macintosh case style. The bevelled edges were also used on Apple's other products of the time like the Apple II series and the Apple III

"Compact Macintosh" or "Classic Macintosh" are informal terms that refer to the direct descendants of the original Macintosh personal computer case design by Apple Computer, Inc. All of them are all-in-one desktop computer designs with the display integrated in the computer case, but not the keyboard. These terms are only used for the models using the case style of the original Macintosh sold between 1984 and the mid-90s — later, larger all-in-one models like the Macintosh LC 500 series, the Macintosh Performa 5xxx series or the iMac are not usually called "Compact" and definitely not "Classic". The Apple Lisa-derived Macintosh XL is a borderline case, and is included by Apple in their "Classic" spec page, but not counted among the Compact range by others.

Apple divides these models into five form factors: The Macintosh 128K, Macintosh SE, and Macintosh Classic (all with a 9 in (23 cm) black and white screen), the modernized Macintosh Color Classic with a 10 in (25 cm) color screen, and the very different Macintosh XL.

Contents

  • Models 1
  • Timeline of compact Macintosh models 2
  • See also 3
  • Notes 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Models

The SE, designed along Snow White guidelines.
The Classic II, using Apple's early 1990s design style.
The Color Classic with its modernized "neoclassical" case.
Model Model Number Form factor CPU
Macintosh 128K M0001* Macintosh 128K Motorola 68000
Macintosh 512K M0001W* Macintosh 128K Motorola 68000
Macintosh XL A6S0300 Lisa Motorola 68000
Macintosh Plus M0001A* Macintosh 128K Motorola 68000
Macintosh 512K/800 M0001D Macintosh 128K Motorola 68000
Macintosh 512Ke M0001E Macintosh 128K Motorola 68000
Macintosh ED M0001ED Macintosh 128K Motorola 68000
Macintosh Plus ED / European Version* M0001AP Macintosh 128K Motorola 68000
Macintosh SE M5010 Macintosh SE Motorola 68000
Macintosh SE 1/20 M5011 Macintosh SE Motorola 68000
Macintosh SE 1/40 M5011 Macintosh SE Motorola 68000
Macintosh SE FDHD M5011 Macintosh SE Motorola 68000
Macintosh SE SuperDrive M5011 Macintosh SE Motorola 68000
Macintosh SE/30 M5119 Macintosh SE Motorola 68030
Macintosh Classic M1420 Macintosh Classic Motorola 68000
Macintosh Classic II M4150 Macintosh Classic Motorola 68030
Macintosh Performa 200 M4150 Macintosh Classic Motorola 68030
Macintosh Color Classic M1600 Macintosh Color Classic Motorola 68030
Macintosh Performa 250 M1600 Macintosh Color Classic Motorola 68030
Macintosh Color Classic II M1600 Macintosh Color Classic Motorola 68030
Macintosh Performa 275 M1600 Macintosh Color Classic Motorola 68030

*220V international models are appended with the letter "P" (e.g. M0001P)

Timeline of compact Macintosh models

See also

Notes

  • ^ The name "Classic Macintosh" is widespread, but somewhat confusing because some (but not all) specific models in the series were called "Macintosh Classic", and also because of the "Classic" software environment in Mac OS X.

References

  • Compact Macs Index and Compact Macs Guide at lowendmac.com
  • AppleSpec database for "Classic" models at apple.com
  • Macintosh "Classic" Series at everymac.com (also includes the Macintosh TV, which is more closely related to the LC 5xx family)

External links

  • The Vintage Mac Museum: Compact Mac -9inch/mono Display 68000-
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