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Connell, Washington

 

Connell, Washington

Connell, Washington
City
Location of Connell, Washington
Location of Connell, Washington
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Washington
County Franklin
Area[1]
 • Total 7.87 sq mi (20.38 km2)
 • Land 7.87 sq mi (20.38 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 846 ft (258 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 4,209
 • Estimate (2014)[3] 5,388
 • Density 534.8/sq mi (206.5/km2)
Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 99326
Area code 509
FIPS code 53-14485
GNIS feature ID 1504104[4]
Website cityofconnell.com

Connell is a city in Franklin County, Washington, United States. The population was 4,209 at the 2010 census. The Washington State Office of Financial Management's 2013 estimate placed the population at 5,350.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Today 1.1
  • Geography 2
    • Climate 2.1
  • Demographics 3
    • 2010 census 3.1
    • 2000 census 3.2
  • References 4
  • External links 5

History

Prior to 1883 the area now known as Connell was used by ranchers as open range for cattle and horses. The community was established in 1883 as a junction between the Northern Pacific Railroad and the Oregon Railroad and Navigation Company. The new town was called Palouse Junction by Jacob Cornelius Connell, a railroad official and resident. Palouse Junction was unique on the Ainsworth to Spokane run, in that it was not on a river. It was also the gateway to the Palouse via the OR&N's line to Washtucna. Water for trains and for the town was from public wells dug by the railroad. At some time between 1886 and 1900, the town was renamed to Connell.[5]

The Northern Pacific Railroad ceased service to the station in 1890,[6] but the Union Pacific Railroad took over the station in 1901, and the town began to grow again. A school district was formed sometime between 1900 and 1904. In 1902 the Franklin County Bank was Incorporated in Connell, and the Connell Land and Improvement Company was established. Also in that year, the county allowed a franchisee to begin piping in water for the town (Although this was never very successful, and the following year a good well hit water at 268 feet).[7] In 1903, lots on the west side of the tracks were sold, and a new commercial district began to grow, and a number of existing buildings were even moved to these new lots.

By this time the town rivaled Pasco in importance in Franklin County. Unfortunately, much of the business district was destroyed by fire in July, 1905. The destroyed sections were quickly rebuilt using brick.[8] Connell was officially incorporated on November 28, 1910. Dryland wheat farming was the lifeblood of Connell through most of the twentieth century.

Today

The primary industrial base is food processing, agricultural chemicals and a minimum and medium-security correctional facility that is capable of holding 2600 offenders. The community is also home to the North Franklin School District where there is a high school, junior high, grade school and administration offices. Both the state and county have transportation facilities in the community. The community has many well maintained parks. The city also has a pool which was recently remodeled. City athletic fields range from general purpose open space, to soccer and baseball fields. The city has purchased additional water rights and has water for future growth in residential, commercial and industrial activities. A new wastewater treatment facility was completed. New waterlines were installed to replace aging pipes.

During the last ten years, the city has rebuilt Columbia Avenue, the main thoroughfare, and reconstructed its industrial streets, and received a grant award to reconstruct a portion of Clark Street. This roadway connects the downtown to Highway 260 on the west side of town, and serves the junior and senior high schools and administration buildings for the school district. The medium-security facility Coyote Ridge Corrections Center, was built near the city.

Connell continues to struggle to find its "niche". Local businesses struggle to compete against the major business of the Tri-Cities and Othello. Several businesses have left (Akins Food, B&H clothing, Tru-Value Hardware and Les Schwab Tire) and very few new businesses have been established.

Former Spokane Valley, Washington City Councilman Steve Taylor was selected as Connell's new city Administrator.[9] Connell has a strong-mayor form of city government with the Administrator reporting to the mayor.

Coyote Ridge Corrections Facility is actively hiring hundreds of employees, Oasis Custom Homes purchased land across from the High School and is building many new homes in a master-planned community called the Oasis Village Connell, and the school district has constructed a new elementary school on Clark Street, next to the Oasis Village. Even commercial lots near Hwy 395 are being purchased and developed. A Subway franchise opened in Connell in June 2012.

Geography

Connell is located at (46.658300, -118.860842).[10] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.87 square miles (20.38 km2), all of it land.[1]

Climate

According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Connell has a semi-arid climate, abbreviated "BSk" on climate maps.[11]

Climate data for Connell, Washington
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 63
(17)
76
(24)
84
(29)
99
(37)
101
(38)
107
(42)
112
(44)
114
(46)
102
(39)
90
(32)
75
(24)
67
(19)
114
(46)
Average high °F (°C) 35.5
(1.9)
43.3
(6.3)
54.4
(12.4)
64.1
(17.8)
73.2
(22.9)
81.0
(27.2)
90.4
(32.4)
88.5
(31.4)
78.2
(25.7)
64.1
(17.8)
46.9
(8.3)
37.3
(2.9)
63.08
(17.25)
Average low °F (°C) 22.4
(−5.3)
27.4
(−2.6)
32.0
(0)
36.0
(2.2)
42.4
(5.8)
48.7
(9.3)
54.5
(12.5)
53.2
(11.8)
46.0
(7.8)
37.3
(2.9)
30.4
(−0.9)
25.2
(−3.8)
37.96
(3.31)
Record low °F (°C) −28
(−33)
−30
(−34)
6
(−14)
11
(−12)
21
(−6)
28
(−2)
31
(−1)
31
(−1)
19
(−7)
4
(−16)
−12
(−24)
−29
(−34)
−30
(−34)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 1.1
(28)
0.9
(23)
0.9
(23)
0.8
(20)
0.8
(20)
0.7
(18)
0.3
(8)
0.3
(8)
0.5
(13)
0.8
(20)
1.4
(36)
1.4
(36)
9.9
(253)
Source: Weatherbase[12]

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 4,209 people, 878 households, and 689 families residing in the city. The population density was 534.8 inhabitants per square mile (206.5/km2). There were 922 housing units at an average density of 117.2 per square mile (45.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 73.4% White, 6.4% African American, 1.9% Native American, 2.7% Asian, 0.4% Pacific Islander, 12.2% from other races, and 3.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 39.3% of the population.

There were 878 households of which 50.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.2% were married couples living together, 15.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 8.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 21.5% were non-families. 19.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.14 and the average family size was 3.53.

The median age in the city was 32.5 years. 23.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 37.6% were from 25 to 44; 22.8% were from 45 to 64; and 5.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 67.5% male and 32.5% female.

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 2,956 people, 766 households, and 602 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,034.8 people per square mile (399.1/km²). There were 891 housing units at an average density of 311.9 per square mile (120.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 63.19% White, 3.92% African American, 1.12% Native American, 4.36% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 21.52% from other races, and 5.85% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 41.47% of the population.

There were 766 households out of which 48.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.1% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.3% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.17 and the average family size was 3.59.

In the city the age distribution of the population shows 31.4% under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 32.4% from 25 to 44, 18.3% from 45 to 64, and 5.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 142.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 160.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $33,992, and the median income for a family was $38,309. Males had a median income of $30,129 versus $24,444 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,600. About 15.9% of families and 19.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.7% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  3. ^ a b "Population Estimates".  
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  5. ^ http://www.cityofconnell.com/history_palousejunction.html
  6. ^ http://historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=7452
  7. ^ http://www.cityofconnell.com/history_townsitewater.html
  8. ^ http://www.cityofconnell.com/history_fireandflood.html
  9. ^ http://www.tri-cityherald.com/kennewick_pasco_richland/story/619405.html
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  11. ^ Climate Summary for Connell, Washington
  12. ^ "Weatherbase: Weather for Connell, Washington, United States of America". Weatherbase. 2015.  Retrieved on August 21, 2015.
  13. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  14. ^  

External links

  • City of Connell
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